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Old 07-29-2015, 09:43 PM   #1
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Saturated fat content

When ground beef lists saturated fat content, I assume that content means before cooking, right? Suppose the saturated fat content in 4 ounces of ground beef is 4 grams. When that 4 ounces of beef is cooked on a grill, how much saturated fat is left? In other words, after grilling, how much saturated fat is one actually consuming?

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Old 07-29-2015, 10:08 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by gogreen1 View Post
When ground beef lists saturated fat content, I assume that content means before cooking, right? Suppose the saturated fat content in 4 ounces of ground beef is 4 grams. When that 4 ounces of beef is cooked on a grill, how much saturated fat is left? In other words, after grilling, how much saturated fat is one actually consuming?
That would depend on how done you cook it. Rare would render a lot less fat out than well done. As far as numbers, I haven't a clue. If I was truly worried about it, I wouldn't be eating ground beef in the first place.

Despite loving ground beef, out of just these concerns I don't eat it nearly as often as I once did. I've decided that what I get is what I get, and as long as my health is good, I'm happy with it. I'm 68, a bit overweight, but otherwise healthy as a horse. I believe that sometimes people can get so caught up in the numbers that they forget to enjoy eating.
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Old 07-29-2015, 10:22 PM   #3
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Welcome to DC.

Click on the link http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search to go to the US Dept. of Agriculture's nutrition database. There you can enter a food product and see the nutritional make up. For your ground beef, first look up the ground beef raw then compare the values to the same ground beef cooked to see the change.
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Old 07-29-2015, 10:38 PM   #4
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I usually pick chicken, turkey, or ground beef that's no more than 4 grams of saturated fat per 4-ounce service. And I usually grill these things well-done. I wonder if I'm actually consuming about half of the listed content then.
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Old 07-29-2015, 10:39 PM   #5
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Thanks, Andy. I'll check out the website.
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Old 07-29-2015, 11:23 PM   #6
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That would depend on how done you cook it. Rare would render a lot less fat out than well done. As far as numbers, I haven't a clue. If I was truly worried about it, I wouldn't be eating ground beef in the first place.

Despite loving ground beef, out of just these concerns I don't eat it nearly as often as I once did. I've decided that what I get is what I get, and as long as my health is good, I'm happy with it. I'm 68, a bit overweight, but otherwise healthy as a horse. I believe that sometimes people can get so caught up in the numbers that they forget to enjoy eating.
Welcome to DC, gogreen!

Just my opinion, but I'm with RP here. You don't really know exactly what's in ground beef from the supermarkets, and how you cook it makes a difference. I don't buy ground beef from the grocery store very often, but every now and then I want to grill a burger and I enjoy it. I agree that it would be mighty hard to tell the exact fat content once it's on your plate.
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Old 07-30-2015, 08:42 AM   #7
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You don't really know exactly what's in ground beef from the supermarkets
Do you mean saturated fat content, or other things? I usually cook all meats, fish, and poultry well done.
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Old 07-30-2015, 11:12 AM   #8
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Do you mean saturated fat content, or other things? I usually cook all meats, fish, and poultry well done.
Really? I can't imagine eating everything cooked to death (sorry for the superlative, but that's how I see it).

Poultry must be cooked through, but not to point of being dried out.

Most beef I prefer medium rare, or medium when cooked in some dishes. The exception is something like pot roast or braised short ribs or the like, which are slow cooked long enough to be well done. Ground beef I do about medium in hamburger sized patties, but it will be more well done when crumbled and browned for a casserole, or roasted as in a meat loaf. Beef cooked too far done becomes tough and dry.

Lamb is usually medium rare.

Fish is usually just cooked until it flakes, often only 2 or 3 minutes depending on the type of fish and the size of the cut. Some, like tuna steak, is cooked rare (and not my favorite fish by a long way).

Pork is no longer required to be well done as it was in the past either. I usually cook it medium unless I'm smoking it.

Any way you look at it, by cooking everything well done, you are missing out on many of the flavors and textures that define good, properly prepared foods.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:32 PM   #9
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Welcome to DC! I grind my own meat if I want a burger. When I buy from the farm gate and pick up at the abattoire, I know the meat hasn't gone through one of those tenderizer machines. And, I control the percentage of fat.
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Old 07-30-2015, 05:52 PM   #10
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if the label says
"ground beef" the USDA has a whole lotta' one idea of what "can be in the meat" - beef, that's it, that's all. no additives, no binders, no flavors, no enhancement of any kind or type.

and for the conspiracy that they add lots of ice to increase the weight, USDA also sets a maximum free water content. so if the local meat cutters are bragging to you about how they add a lot of ice to increase profits, you might want to make a couple phone calls.

I suppose it could be 'mechanically tenderized' - but why make that effort for something that is going to be ground up in to fine itty-bitty pieces comma anyway....

stuff labeled hamburger / beef patty / Bubba's Sliders / etc and kazillions of other creative "names" is not subject to the same regulation.

and in every market I've seen in the last few billions years, including my local butcher, the fat content is clearly shown. 93/7 - 80/20 - 70/30 etc.
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