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Old 08-14-2006, 03:01 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Gretchen
I don't think there would be because it is not in with the charcoal. But I don't think it is at all necessary either. I have had to stick another wadded up newspaper underneath from time to time.
I'd rather use another wad of paper than buy fatwood. Another thing for newbie chimney users: 2 pieces of newspaper is plenty. I thought more would be better but I was wrong.

Some of you guys go to great lengths (Goodweed!) to light charcoal.

When I use charcoal, its Kingsford, chimney with newspaper. I would like to try the lump and natural wood fuels though.
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Old 08-15-2006, 12:23 AM   #42
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virginny-griller, there really is a difference with lump hardwood over briquette. almost as great a differential as charcoal is to propane grills.

unfortunately, it's more expensive as well. it costs more per weight unit, and burns hotter and faster than briquettes, so you use more. but if you only grill once in a while, it's the way to go. you get really great woody-smokey flavors on your food, without a trace of anything chemical in any way.
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Old 08-15-2006, 10:37 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by buckytom
virginny-griller, there really is a difference with lump hardwood over briquette. almost as great a differential as charcoal is to propane grills.

unfortunately, it's more expensive as well. it costs more per weight unit, and burns hotter and faster than briquettes, so you use more. but if you only grill once in a while, it's the way to go. you get really great woody-smokey flavors on your food, without a trace of anything chemical in any way.
Although Bucky considers me a dark side propane purist, I do in fact have a charcaol grill, and I'll also cast my vote for plain charcoal (no match light type stuff).

Although, If I could, I'd like to get some of the charcoal they filter Jack Daniels through. I bet that wouldn't need any lighter fluid at all , and the additional flavors imparted probably would be welcomed by most people running a charcoal grill.

(I believe they actually DO sell some of the barrel staves as smoker wood, as do the folks from tabasco)

John
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Old 05-20-2007, 11:01 AM   #44
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i stopped using lighter fluid a few years back .. once you use a chimney
you will never go back ...
a really easy way to light it is to put over a burner on a gas grill ...
thats about all i use mine for nowadays ..
as far as charcoal .. kingsford is ok is a pinch ..
i really like royal oak .. the taste and smell is fantastic ...
for lump .. cowboy is pretty good ...
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Old 05-20-2007, 07:59 PM   #45
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I think, if you go back a ways, you'll find that I use a mix of briquette and lump hardwood. I've used Royal Oak before, but it's been years, and I can't remember how it stacks up to Cowboy. I like Cowboy, as it's fairly uniform in size (scrap lumber). If I remember right, I've gotten some really HUGE lumps of charcoal out of a bag, possible Royal Oak. One time, using Meijer store brand (up in Michigan), I actually got a good-sized ROCK in a bag of charcoal.
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Old 05-21-2007, 01:38 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by love2"Q"
i stopped using lighter fluid a few years back .. once you use a chimney
you will never go back ...
a really easy way to light it is to put over a burner on a gas grill ...
thats about all i use mine for nowadays ..
as far as charcoal .. kingsford is ok is a pinch ..
i really like royal oak .. the taste and smell is fantastic ...
for lump .. cowboy is pretty good ...
LOL - that's exactly what I use my gas grill for - to start my chimmeys! When I cook I usally need about 4 chimneys going because of the surface space. Then I get them going again - LOL

Allen - You gave me some very useful info about the briquettes and their staying power - that will come in handy on Wednesday when I smoke my turkey.
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Old 05-21-2007, 09:25 AM   #47
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KE, yes, briquettes have "staying power", but I'm not crazy about the flavor of the smoke they produce, or the amount of ash they produce. Burning lump hardwood charcoal, or better yet, wood, gives a much cleaner tasting smoke, and less ash.

Now that I've got some wood, I only use charcoal to get the fire going.

Four chimneys of charcoal? Wow! How much food are you cooking?

If you remember my grill, it's huge. I've recently learned that to produce really great-tasting, juicy-tender meats like bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts, or pork tenderloins, "less is better" for charcoal. I've always loaded up two chimneys full of charcoal, got that going, and then seared/murdered my meat on the grill. Now, I load up just one chimney, get that going, spread the coals out evenly (they aren't really touching, but do give out an even heat), and drop the fire grate down to it's lowest position. Once I get the meat on the grill, I shut the lid and "fire-roast" the meat, usually turning it once every 5 minutes. After 20 minutes, I'll temp it with my probe thermometer to see if it's done.

Usually, the bone-in, skin-on breasts are given to me by my g'mother, and it actually takes 35 - 40 minutes to cook them. I also brine the breasts, as well as pork tenders, for an hour or so before I grill them.
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Old 05-22-2007, 02:24 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
virginny-griller, there really is a difference with lump hardwood over briquette. almost as great a differential as charcoal is to propane grills.

unfortunately, it's more expensive as well. it costs more per weight unit, and burns hotter and faster than briquettes, so you use more. but if you only grill once in a while, it's the way to go. you get really great woody-smokey flavors on your food, without a trace of anything chemical in any way.
My experience is lump burns hotter and longer than briquettes so you dont use nearly as much as briquettes. Also the ash created by lump is minimal compared to briquettes.
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:13 PM   #49
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I dont see the advantage of a chimney starter. You pile up the coals vertically to conduct heat, you vent at bottom and top ( I do this too with regular charcoal). What type of charcoal is used in the chimney starter? Thanks GB for the pic that helped alot to visualize! Matts, charcoal made from wood? How does it ignite when you light the fire? I dont understand charcoal made from wood actually.
Amber - The Charcoal starter is a requirement at my house, and I do not own a gas grill. I like that the starter gets the charcoal going to a cook temp quickly, and does not require any fluids. Just a few pieces of news paper.

Once the starter is well lit (flames coming out the top), I know it's ready for use once the charcoal is white, or the flames have stoped coming out the top.

That is for grilling. If I am smoking something indirectly, I normally use hard wood "lump" for smoking (BBQ low and slow). I also have an electronic temp gage (three piece) so I can test the temp of the cook surface, and test the cook temp of two items (like a brisket and a pork roast).

Anywho, take what you want from my post. I like to both grill, and the BBQ. I just don't have the experience to call myself a BBQ expert.

Regards,

Casper
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:15 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
I dont see the advantage of a chimney starter. You pile up the coals vertically to conduct heat, you vent at bottom and top ( I do this too with regular charcoal). What type of charcoal is used in the chimney starter? Thanks GB for the pic that helped alot to visualize! Matts, charcoal made from wood? How does it ignite when you light the fire? I dont understand charcoal made from wood actually.
Amber - The Charcoal starter is a requirement at my house, and I do not own a gas grill. I like that the starter gets the charcoal going to a cook temp quickly, and does not require any fluids. Just a few pieces of news paper.

Once the starter is well lit (flames coming out the top), I know it's ready for use once the charcoal is white, or the flames have stoped coming out the top.

That is for grilling. If I am smoking something indirectly, I normally use hard wood "lump" for smoking (BBQ low and slow). I also have an electronic temp gage (three piece) so I can test the temp of the cook surface, and test the cook temp of two items (like a brisket and a pork roast) remotely, and after hours. Ribs can take 6 hours, and Brisket can take 15 hours if large. It's nice to have a way to monitor without being physicaly there.

Anywho, take what you want from my post. I like to both grill, and the BBQ. I just don't have the experience to call myself a BBQ expert.

Regards,

Casper
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