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Old 10-18-2007, 12:18 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
Something else called a Dutch Oven is a camp oven ... again made from thick cast iron - no legs and has a domed lid with cone-shaped spikes on the bottom of the lid ... these collect condensation and help redistribute the moisture evenly across the pot. These can be used on the stovetop or in the oven.
Michael, I've always seen and heard the term camp Dutch oven used in reference to the oven with three supporting legs and a flanged lid, as opposed to the one with no legs and a domed lid. If I'm not mistaken, John G. Ragsdale, author of Dutch Ovens Chronicled: Their Use In The United States and considered by many to be an expert on the subject, describes a camp oven in that manner. As you state in another post, even Lodge refers to them that way. So I'm intrigued. I would really like to get my terminolgy correct. Do you have any resources you can direct me to so that I do some further reading?
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:59 AM   #12
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Sounds like you are familiar with cast iron cooking. If not do not let seasoning scare you off. Just remember not to use soap or a scrubbing pad on cast iron. It removes the seasoning. My cast iron is well seasoned and only requires hot water to clean it. We have DO's, frying pans, camp ovens, and a wok. Last a lifetime and inexpensive compared to other types on the market. Seasoning does not happen overnight. You do the initial seasoning then it builds as you use it. I find the traditional cast iron creates a smoother finish over time than the pre-seasoned type you can now purchase.
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Old 10-18-2007, 07:46 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by David Cottrell
Thanks everyone - I think I have it! Use will be indoors stove top or oven. Modest prices sound like cast iron as I don't mind seasoning and special care in cleaning - like a cast iron skillet is hard to beat.
Good choice David. Check out Lodge Brand's 5 quart "Kitchen" models. They are 10 1/4" by 4" deep which is a good size for the kitchen. They have, I think, three 5 quart models. 2 with wire bails, and 1 with loop handles. If you plan on going in and out of the stove you may find the one with loop handls a little easier to use.

Enjoy!
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:36 AM   #14
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Thanks again to all, including Katie E - I learned a bunch from you also, for a later purchase. Meanwhile it does seem that Lodge Brand Dutch Oven is well recommended in a five quart size with appropriate handles. This place can't be beat - for anyone just looking go ahead and join up! You will be glad you did.
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Old 10-18-2007, 05:22 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Dutchess
Michael, I've always seen and heard the term camp Dutch oven used in reference to the oven with three supporting legs and a flanged lid, as opposed to the one with no legs and a domed lid. If I'm not mistaken, John G. Ragsdale, author of Dutch Ovens Chronicled: Their Use In The United States and considered by many to be an expert on the subject, describes a camp oven in that manner. As you state in another post, even Lodge refers to them that way. So I'm intrigued. I would really like to get my terminolgy correct. Do you have any resources you can direct me to so that I do some further reading?
Well, Dutchess - you have certainly done more reading about this than I have ... but, I don't think I ever implied I was an authority on the subject:

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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
LOL - I learned about these things and how to use them from my grandparents, aunts and uncles that actually traveled to TX in wagons from GA, MS, AL - and used them on the trail. ...
And since none of them ever graduated hi-school I doubt I was getting a scholarly education - just edumacated by what they knew to call these things.

Now, if a camp oven or a camp dutch oven is a flat-topped pot with 3 legs and a dutch oven has a flat bottom and a domed lid - I can live with that, and change how I refer to them!
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Old 10-18-2007, 05:47 PM   #16
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I'm in the market for a DO, thanks for all the great info!!!
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:18 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
LOL - I learned about these things and how to use them from my grandparents, aunts and uncles that actually traveled to TX in wagons from GA, MS, AL - and used them on the trail. It's a shame that even Lodge has vacillated in what they call a dutch oven and a camp oven ... a year or so ago they called a DO a camp oven, but in the Boy Scout cookware they got the names right! Go figure ...

Logic test: when would you want to use a round vs an oval french oven, and why to cook the following:

1) Pork/beef tenderloin
2) Beef pot roast
3) Roasting a whole chicken
4) Pork roast
I’ve been studying this a bit, and for the life of me, all I can come up with is oval for the loin (and add veggies!) and round for the last three items (assuming the pork roast is not a full shoulder). I would do so based on the shape of the meat, and how I’m going to place the coals and get heat circulating.

So, what is the reasoning and logic here for doing it right?
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Old 10-18-2007, 09:24 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
Now, if a camp oven or a camp dutch oven is a flat-topped pot with 3 legs and a dutch oven has a flat bottom and a domed lid - I can live with that, and change how I refer to them!
Oh, and by-the-way (BTW), I had an epiphany about your user-name tonight. Call me slow! But I always read it as:

Michael in FTW = Michael in For The Win (FTW is net slang for “For The Win”).

I paid a little more attention tonight and noticed that you more than likely meant Forth Worth (FtW) Texas. Yeah, feeling real smart about now!!

But still….my way had a nice ring and rhyme to it…..Michael in….For The Win!!! Which you usually do!
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Old 10-18-2007, 10:01 PM   #19
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I actually don't have an answer, keltin - just wanted to see what others thought about it and what they would have as justification for their choice.

If I had a round and an oval french oven ... I would probably select one based on the overall shape of the food - tenderloins and chickens are oval - roasts are generally round ... depending on the roast.

What made me think of it was actually a TV cook/chef that called for using an oval dutch oven to make a stew.

Yeah - FtW stands for Fort Worth, TX. Hey - I'm a Rangers (baseball) fan - win isn't in my vocabulary!
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Old 10-18-2007, 10:23 PM   #20
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Please excuse me for joining in because I have a question instead of an answer but since I'm just learning myself, wouldn't an oval French oven work good for a shoulder or ham since it seems like their shapes would be sort of form fitting?
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