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Old 10-19-2007, 01:39 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Personally………..I’d suggest an outdoor camp DO, but I’m partial to that!

For a good DO for inside cooking, go with cast iron, flat bottom. domed lid, and go with Lodge. You can’t beat them. Cast iron is slow to heat, but holds heat fantastically. It can be used on stove-top or oven. A fantastic piece!

And dang if these great pieces aren’t also very affordable!!!

If you want a DO for outdoor, then go with one with this design. You need a flat lid and legs to keep it off the ground.

A 10" is great to start with and perfect for 2 people. A 12" is bigger and can handle most anything.
While attempting to answer my own question I found that design for $10 less at Bass Pro Shops. Might be worth a trip if you have one close.
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Old 10-19-2007, 07:01 PM   #32
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Callisto in NC says, "While attempting to answer my own question I found that design for $10 less at Bass Pro Shops. Might be worth a trip if you have one close."

Thanks, don't have one close here in Ohio - but on line they do have a nice line-up of Lodge cast iron don't they.
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Old 10-19-2007, 07:34 PM   #33
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Dutch Oven History

I just received a reply about DO history from Lynne Olver, Editor, of www.foodtimeline.com She kindly hand copied some reference material on the history for me - it's kinda long but adds interesting info to the discussion - should I copy it into this thread? Be glad to - it's ready to go. Would one of the managers let me know? Thanks?
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Old 10-19-2007, 08:43 PM   #34
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Andy M.: The Curious Cook is a bit different from On Food and Cooking - it's out of print and can be hard to find, especially at a reasonable price. This is the only thing I'ver bought off eBay ... and it was about $50 cheaper than off Amazon! There is one HB copy on eBay now - with a BuyItNow price of only $10 + $3.75 shipping! That, my friend, is a steal!!! If you saw Alton Brown's "myth smashers" episode ... you'll quickly figure out where he got the idea for the show. I would venture to guess that not many people would really enjoy it - but knowing you I think you would.

Callisto: Yep, it pays to shop around! Bass Pro, Cabellas, WalMart, some Army-Navy stores, even Ace Hardware are good sources for some CI cookware for less than the MSRP list prices Lodge sells their stuff for on their website. Of course - Good Will and Salvation Army thrift stores can be a treasure trove some times.

David Cottrell: Hey - post it! We're all here to share thoughts and ideas ... I know I'm not to old or stubborn to learn something new.
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:18 PM   #35
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Exclamation DO History from Food Time Line

From Foodtimeline
Date 2007/10/19 Fri PM 05:38:45 CDT
To david cottrell
Subject Re: Dutch Ovens

Mr. Cottrell,

The Oxford English Dictionary traces the print genesis of "Dutch Oven" to 1922. American food historians beg to differ. On a practical note? This versatile, portable cooking receptacle married the cauldron with the spider.

"The term "Dutch oven" as used here, refers to an American pot of European ancestry, a small, portable, cast-iron oven that as evolved to accommodate changing fuel sources since the eighteenth century. This is to distinguish it from the English use of the same term, which refers to what Americans call tin-reflecting ovens or side-wall fireplace brick ovens.

The derivation of the term is similarly unclear, perhaps referring to legendary
Dutch frugality (far less fuel required) or perhaps early Dutch expertise in casting iron, but it is probably an American designation. In any case, the American Dutch oven has been valued for its combination of steaming and baking, stewing, and braising.

Eighteenth-century American Dutch ovens were designed for the hearth, where they were heated with glowing embers. The high rims of their heavy lids held the flowing fuel on the top. Additional heat was provided by piles of coals underneath, and the oven's three legs held it a good height above the heat source.

Dutch ovens hung over the heat from swinging bail handles or were maneuvered by C-shaped handles on their sides. They were made in different sizes--the smallest was simultaneously pot and oven, while the larger ones could also contain pans of food. American Dutch vens can be traced to seventeenth-century Europe in such still-life paintings as Harmen Van Steenwyrk's Skillet and Game (1646)...

An English version called the "bake kettle" varied, in that it was sometimes a round-bottomed, straight-sided kettle that hung covered over the heat and at other times was a flat-bottomed hanging kettle...These kettles were often found in remote European areas with little access to commercial bakeries or enough wood to fuel home brick ovens.

American Dutch ovens were manufactured in the colonies in the eighteenth century--the Pine Grove Furnace (Pennsylvania) produced three sizes...By the mid- to late nineteenth century, early American manufacturers of cast-iron implements were producing variations of hearth Dutch ovens called "spiders" (frying pans) and ovens that retained their legs and high-rimmed heavy lids."


---Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, Andrew F. Smith editor [Oxford University Press:New
York] 2004, Volume 1 (p. 416-7)

"Why "Dutch"? One reasonable explanation for the name is given by Louise Peet and Lenore Sater in Household Equipment, NY John Wiley, 1934, 1940. They wrote: "Dutch ovens were brought to America by the Pilgrims. As it is well known the Pilgrims spent some time in Holland before coming to America. The Mayflower was a tiny vessel and baggage limited.

The dutch oven could be used for such a variety of cookery that it took the place of several other pots and pans and was, therefore, a favorite utensil of the early settlers."...The word "Dutch" is sometimes used to indicate that something is a substitute for something else...a Dutch oven is a substitute for a built-in bake oven."

---300 Years of Kitchen Collectibles, Linda Campbell Franlin, [Krause Publications:IolaWI] 5th edition, 2003 (p.
573)

If you need more information please let us know.
-----------------------------------
Lynne Olver (IACP), editor
The Food Timeline
Food Timeline: food history information & historic recipes
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:21 PM   #36
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Sorry it's so long, but I see where the "oven" came from - the large pots were big enough to hold several pans and hence served as ovens hanging over the open fire or hot coals.
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:52 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
Callisto: Yep, it pays to shop around! Bass Pro, Cabellas, WalMart, some Army-Navy stores, even Ace Hardware are good sources for some CI cookware for less than the MSRP list prices Lodge sells their stuff for on their website. Of course - Good Will and Salvation Army thrift stores can be a treasure trove some times.
Hey, Michael, comment and two questions. Comment ~ our Wal-Mart sucks for CI. I can't even buy a stovetop grill there that's worth anything. They carry some {assumed} POS for $12 that's supposedly pre-cured but it doesn't look like it and the rest is no name carp. I look every time I'm there. The good news is I work by Bass Pro so next payday I think I'll make a stop.

Now to the questions. What is Cabellas? And my "dutch oven" says on the lid it's a dutch oven. The lid is nested by slightly domed and it has no feet. I love it for frying and it so well cured because of that frying. So is it really a dutch oven since it doesn't have feet and the lid is slightly domed? It's about 50 years old, if not older. My dad is 70 and he and my mom got it as a wedding gift and I think my parents married at about 23. The lid says it's a Grisworld No. 9 Tight-Top Dutch Oven. Ever heard of it?
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Old 10-19-2007, 10:56 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC
... our Wal-Mart sucks for CI. I can't even buy a stovetop grill there that's worth anything. ...
Not all stores carry the same inventory ... I know that even around here it differs from store to store ... they stock what sells the most at each store (according to a WalMart department maganer). I know that the Ace Hardware store in one part of town has very little CI - and another one on the other side of town with a large Mexican population has a lot - and better prices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC
What is Cabellas?
Sorry - my fingers stuttered on the "L" .... it's Cabela's ... they are to Bass Pro what Target is to K-Mart is to WalMart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC
And my "dutch oven" says on the lid it's a dutch oven. The lid is nested by slightly domed and it has no feet. I love it for frying and it so well cured because of that frying. So is it really a dutch oven since it doesn't have feet and the lid is slightly domed? It's about 50 years old, if not older. My dad is 70 and he and my mom got it as a wedding gift and I think my parents married at about 23.
LOL - that is kind of what we're debating - or rather, trying to figure out! Was "Dutch Oven" a term applied to two different pots used in two different but similar ways???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC
The lid says it's a Grisworld No. 9 Tight-Top Dutch Oven. Ever heard of it?
Griswold is excellent cast iron .... produced from about 1865 through the late 1950's in Erie, PA. It is now "collectable" due to its age and since it is no longer made. Your pot is probably also labeled "9 Erie 2552" somewhere under/around the logo - and probably measures 11" in diameter and 4 1/2" deep. My aunt has one that was my grandmothers - and she uses it a lot.
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Old 10-19-2007, 11:55 PM   #39
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Michael, you are just scary smart. YES, it has the 2552 stamp and says patent 1920 on the inside of the lid. My daddy was raised in Franklin/Oil City area PA so this is original location purchase. I guess I'll hold on to it like it's gold. I love the pot. I fry in it, I boil potatoes in it, and I cook roasts in it. It's indestructible.

Thank you so much for your wealth of knowledge. I'm really happy about that info and it makes me feel connected to my family. I feel like I need to ask my dad if it might have been my grandma's before he married my mom because it's definitely older than their marriage.
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Old 10-20-2007, 01:30 PM   #40
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Around these parts (that would be world-wide) we like to think of Michael as a resource. I've yet to see a subject he doesn't know something about. In fact, I'm going to open up a non-food thread just to see if we can't throw something at him that he doesn't know, heh, heh.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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