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Old 04-14-2011, 09:02 AM   #11
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With charcoal cooking, set up the charcoal for direct heat, that is, a solid bed of charcoal. The flavor of the pork by itself, with a little maple, birch, or fruitwood thrown on the fire, with salt an pepper will give you amazing pork chops. Cook to a 145', as measured with an instant read meat thermometer.

If you want other flavors, these combinations all will work.

1. BuckyTom's dry rub

2. 1 tsp salt, 2 tbs, brown sugar, 1 tbs. chili powder, 1/2 tsp garlic powder, 1/2 tsp, onion powder, 1 tsp. Lime juice (optional)

3. Salt, Pepper, Garlic, Onion, Thyme, Sage

4. Soy Sauce, Brown Sugar, chopped onion, Minced garlic, Vinegar, five-spice powder, (this is a teryaki marinade)

5. Sriracha Pepper Sauce, Tobasco Sauce, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, a little water, Chopped-fresh cilantro

That should be enough options to get you thinking.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-14-2011, 09:50 AM   #12
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Brining is the way to go. That's about the only way we cook pork chops anymore but we only brine anywhere from 2-4 hours at most, otherwise it's just too salty. We use a brine made with molasses or dark brown sugar, salt (obviously), pepper, sometimes add thyme, and use a mixture of water/ice cubes so it can be left out of fridge.
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Old 04-14-2011, 10:28 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by stoneywoods View Post
Here's the skinny...I'm looking for advice for yumdiddly pork chops for my meal on our annual fishin trip.I was thinking of marinading them ,packed in ice for 2 days till it's my turn to cook.Or is that too long? I need a recipe and cook time for some nice 1" butcher chops on a charcoal fire. I'm thinking chilled applesauce and baked potatoe and fresh asparagus as go withs.

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Old 04-14-2011, 03:07 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Brining is the way to go. That's about the only way we cook pork chops anymore but we only brine anywhere from 2-4 hours at most, otherwise it's just too salty. We use a brine made with molasses or dark brown sugar, salt (obviously), pepper, sometimes add thyme, and use a mixture of water/ice cubes so it can be left out of fridge.
In my opinion, there is never only one way to go. Very tender, flavorful, and succulent pork chops can be made with sou vide technique, velvetized meat technique, braising, baking, broiling, grilling, frying, breading and frying or baking, on a stick, over a campfire, etc. But you have to understand how meat reacts to temperature, and other variables such as alkalinity, acidity, enzymatic action, age, fat content, and others. When you really understand how meat reacts to various techniques and environments, then doors are opened and you can expand your options, and tailor your recipes and techniques to the kind of meal you want to present.

In most things in life, including cooking, there are usually a host of ways to successfully do most anything you want to do. Don't limit yourself. Try different options. Ever wonder why so many different cooks swear theirs is the ultimate method for making something, some recipe? It's because they experienced one of many possible ways for preparing something, and it worked for them. I've had success with all of the rubs and techiques that I listed, plus with cooking pork in a pressure cooker. I have my personal favorites. But that's because I have some flavors and textures that I enjoy more than others. I've met people who swear that some recipe is the best they ever tasted, and to me, it was just terrible. And they thought the same thing about some of my favorite foods.

Cooking is a very personal thing. All we can do is to try and follow a few simple guidelines, and take care to present the best food we know how. I may like my pork chop cooked to medium rare, while another person can't stomach any pink in their pork. Does that mean my way or theirs is better. No, it just means that how we like our pork chop is different.

I you can, over time, try each and every technique given you in this thread. Then, decide which one you enjoy the most, then tweek it even further to give it your own special spin. You might marinade your shop in freshly blended pineapple, with brown sugar and ginger. The fresh pineapple will tenderize the pork, due to the natural protein disolving enzyme, bromalaine, found in raw pineapple. It's all good.

Your favorite way of preparing pork chops is up to you. Simply make sure that they are not cooked beyond about 150' F., or they will dry out and toughen, unless of course, that's how you like them.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 04-14-2011, 03:26 PM   #15
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I like simple flavors with grilled pork. I would do rosemary, black pepper and garlic for a dry rub. Or mix all of these in oil and marinate.
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Old 04-14-2011, 03:43 PM   #16
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I'd just brine them. Good grilled pork chops don't need a fancy dress to be pretty.

Brining will help them retain moisture and make them taste more savory.

But I wouldn't brine them for more than 6 hours.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:23 PM   #17
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I'm a big believer in brine for pork chops. Just brine them for four hrs, remove them from the brine, package and freeze them. The frozen chops will help to keep everything cold along with the ice in the cooler.
I used to freeze everything freezable, even milk, before a camping trip.
Your chops will be all ready to throw on the grill.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:48 PM   #18
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You could mix up the marinade and wait till the day its your turn to cook then throw your chops into it and vacume seal it. The seal makes it work faster. They sell little bags and handheld battery powered vacume pumps in the samach bag isle.
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Old 04-15-2011, 08:30 AM   #19
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You could mix up the marinade and wait till the day its your turn to cook then throw your chops into it and vacume seal it. The seal makes it work faster. They sell little bags and handheld battery powered vacume pumps in the samach bag isle.
Unless you have a rigid container that can hold a vacuum, why not just put the meat and marinade into a zipper-type plastic bag, close the zipper most of the way, and press all of the air out. You get no less pressure sucking the air out with a vacuum device as liquid is not compressible. The outside atmosphere exerts the same pressure on the bag as it does if the air is vacuumed out. So I say, why spend the extra money for vacuum?

While you're prepairing for your camp out, mix together 2 cups of flour, 6 tsp. baking powder, 4 tbs. sugar, enough powdered milk for 2 cups milk, enough powdered egg to make 2 eggs worth, and finally, 6 tbs. cooking oil. Place this well mixed mixture into zipper bags and you have outstanding pancake mix that makes much better pancakes that you get from a boxed mix. Store in zipper bags. You can multiply the ingredients by any number to make as much as you need. The above amounts will give you enough batter for pancakes to feed two people. Just add 1 1/2 cups of water to the above mix and stir until everything is wet and the batter forms.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-24-2013, 01:29 PM   #20
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sounds amazing!
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