"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > Campfire & Dutch Oven Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-21-2007, 11:08 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Meat trivet - what Uncle Bob means is something to keep the meat off the bottom of the pot. Some roasting pans have wire racks that sit on the bottom and this keeps the meat up. In this instance he is suggesting you place the veggies on the bottom to not only serve this same purpose but hey, you get to eat them after!
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 11:09 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
UB - I'd say we're pretty much on the same page
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 12:21 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
oh ok i see what a trivit is. ok with katie's recipe for chuck roast ( the link you supplied me) wont the cream of mushroom soup and onion mix hide the smoke flavor that i tried so hard to get in the first place. do you have to cook the chuck in liquid or can you slow cook it with no liquid. dry heat i guess is what im looking for. this is what im trying to do Prime Rib Roast but i dont have a kamado, so im trying to achieve the same thing but with what tools i have, which are a weber grill and a DO.

oh and does braise mean to cook in liquid..
__________________
*A substitute for human interaction* - I really need to find a girl whos name doesnt end with .JPG
http://grillofmydreams.bluedisk.org
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 12:28 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Someone correct me if I'm wrong here - a chuck roast needs some liquid. I would use a beef broth or a consommé versus cream of and the onion mix for the very reason you mentioned. If you THEN want to make some sort of gravy out of the liquid in the pan, have at it! It should be awesome. Remove roast/veggies. If there is a lot of oil in the pan remove most of that too. Make a slurry out of equal parts water and flour. Add a couple TBS of this mixture to your bubbling liquid and stir - keep stirring for about 3 minutes (you can turn down to simmer after you add the slurry). You should have gravy. If it's not thickening enough add more slurry.

Yes, braise means cook in a liquid.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 12:36 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
Man i keep hearing new words form all these cooking sites. so whats the difference between a rue and a slurry? My understanding is that a rue consists of milk/cream, butter and flour. where as a slurry is only milk and flour.

The reason i choose chuck for this, like i stated earlier, money and if i screw up im only out 7$ for the meat. i wonder if i could use a prime rib for this though.hmmm

Oh another question. can you buy thermometers for DO so i can see how hot they are? is there a general rule of thumb for "this many coals = this temp"
__________________
*A substitute for human interaction* - I really need to find a girl whos name doesnt end with .JPG
http://grillofmydreams.bluedisk.org
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 12:43 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
A "roux" is an equal mixture of fat and flour (oil flour or butter and flour) made IN the pan and it can be browned to all different color levels to ultimately affect the color of the final dish. Heat the fat first then once heated slowly add and whisk the flour. Heat over medium to low heat. Don't rush it. Let it turn the color you want. You need to cook it for at least 3 - 5 minutes to remove the flour taste. If you burn the roux throw it out - it will be very bitter!

A slurry is equal parts of water or milk and flour, mixed with a fork then drizzled into said mixture to thicken it. It needs to come to a boil to thicken then as the mixture cools it will thicken.

I would imagine you could use a prime rib and it would be FABULOUS! Someone else will have to discuss your DO temp question - I haven't a clue!
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 12:54 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
sweet. thats cool that you can change the color of it. man i wish i had more time to practice this stuff but being my age school sucks up all your time and so does dance lessons. now i know why my roux's never turned out. i never cooked them long enough and it tasted like flour. plus making and just watching the fat and flour mix together kind made me lose my appetite. i still have that awful taste of flour in my mouth from 4 years ago when i tired ot make a clam chowder for high school.. i had to throw it out.

ok i will ask around about the temp thing, but maybe this sunday i will try a prime rib or a chuck..

if i were to break off some of the branches from my apple tree and put them on the coals would it work like wood chips would.
__________________
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 01:31 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
The apple branches should work fine.

OK, now I have a question about DO's. If the DO has a lid on it how doe the smoke get into it to flavor the meat? I know, probably a dumb question but......
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 04:16 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
what the heck, my email sux. it didnt tell me you posted. ok with the DO im putting the coal on the grate of my weber grill and leaving the DO lid off and using the weber lid to keep the smoke in for about an hour or so. OR i could smoke the meat on the grill for an hour then transfer to a DO..

EDIT

so my DO is in my weber on the grate itself with the coal directly under it. so its kinda cool. its protected form wind and its off the ground.
__________________
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2007, 06:53 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
UB - I'd say we're pretty much on the same page

Is it great minds or something else?
__________________

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.