"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > Campfire & Dutch Oven Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-13-2008, 12:32 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Mentor, OH
Posts: 1,037
NYT Bread in a DO while camping?

I'm going for a weeklong fishing/camping trip with a large group of people (30+) in July, and wondered if anyone has ever made the NYT bread in a DO outdoors. I don't think I can get the top crust as crispy as in the oven at home, but it's more the flavor and the novelty that I'm after. I can proof the bread in the tent out of the breeeze, so that's not a problem. Any advice would be appreciated.

Joe

__________________

__________________
JoeV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 12:51 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
You are doing this over a fire ? Or on a grill?

My guess is that the bottom of the bread would burn. IMO you need to surround the cooking vessel with heat.

But that's just a guess. I've never tried it.

Uncle Bob might have, though. He has a very sweet outdoor cooking set-up.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 01:19 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
I'd suggest baking the loaves in advance, taking them along in zipper-lock bags, and then re-crisping them on the grill when it's time to eat.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 11:10 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Mentor, OH
Posts: 1,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
You are doing this over a fire ? Or on a grill?
This would be done over an open fire. I was hoping someone else already made the mistakes that I'm certain I will make. I learn real well from other people's mistakes. I don'tmind making mistakes in front of strangers because they are usually kind. But friends & relatives, well, that's quite another story.

Joe
__________________
JoeV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2008, 08:32 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
JoeV....Bread can be baked in a Dutch "Oven" with some practice, and understanding of the oven. With the trip in July, and this being Mid May, you certainly have time to practice a couple of times...A couple of Tips...When baking in a Dutch Over the majority of the heat comes from the top (lid) of the oven. Of course this means most of your coals (briquettes) will be placed on the lid....If you have a 12 in oven, and want a 350* baking temperature inside the oven, then a rule of thumb would be 17-18 coals on top, evenly spaced and 7-8 on (underneath) the bottom evenly spaced...Stated another way...about 2/3 of the coals on top...1/3 below. The coals will have to be replaced every hour or so with lit coals to maintain a constant temp. Tip: Every 20 or 30 minutes rotate the oven 1/4 turn...at the same time rotate the lid 1/4 turn in the opposite direction...this helps with even baking of the bread. This will also allow you a very, very quick peek at what's going on in the oven.
Start you practicing with bisquits, cookies, etc...they don't take alot of time.
You will learn a lot, build your confidence, and also get to eat some good bisquits and cookies along the way.

Have Fun!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2008, 05:48 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 453
Send a message via AIM to Russellkhan
Uncle Bob's plan sounds right to me - and since the entire bake takes less than an hour, changing the coals shouldn't be an issue in this case.

It strikes me that the thing that needs to be worked out with this plan is what to do about the last stage of the bake, which is usually done with the lid off of the DO inside of a regular oven. The bread needs that time dry, not moist, so that the crust can harden up. Perhaps just lifting the lid for a few seconds would let out enough moisture, but I'm not sure. Another possibility is leaving the lid cracked during the last stage.
__________________
Russellkhan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2008, 06:50 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russellkhan View Post
Uncle Bob's plan sounds right to me - and since the entire bake takes less than an hour, changing the coals shouldn't be an issue in this case.

It strikes me that the thing that needs to be worked out with this plan is what to do about the last stage of the bake, which is usually done with the lid off of the DO inside of a regular oven. The bread needs that time dry, not moist, so that the crust can harden up. Perhaps just lifting the lid for a few seconds would let out enough moisture, but I'm not sure. Another possibility is leaving the lid cracked during the last stage.
I read through most of the 11 pages of tre NYT bread thread (good reading!) and I think many people found they didnt need to bake with the lid off afterall. I haven't tried it yet myself, but I'm really going to soon!!
__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2008, 07:45 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
I"ve never cooked the recipe inside the kitchen or in a Dutch oven...However; if towards the end of the cook time the top was not as brown as the baker wanted it to be, simply turn on the "broiler"....add a lot of fresh hot coals to the top...and check on it frequently until the desired degree of browning has been accomplished. Or as Miss Suzi suggest...there may be no need to do anything....

Fun
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2008, 11:46 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Idaho
Posts: 13
Sure looks like a lot of biscuits
__________________
BaDaBing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2008, 11:53 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaDaBing View Post
Sure looks like a lot of biscuits
Those aren't biscuits, those are coals on top of a Dutch oven.
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.