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Old 09-29-2005, 05:39 AM   #11
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Hi Jess! Inverted sugar is a heavy syrup, Cris makes it his own. We usually use a regular white sugar, mix it with water and let it cook for some time. Using this kind of syrup is one of the technics he learned from the ice cream making book (which I mentioned in the e-mail), to maintain a correct balance of solid and water contents in the ice cream. If you are interested I will ask Cris for more detailed info and pass it on to you!! ;-)
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Old 09-29-2005, 07:31 AM   #12
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Sounds like he's making a basic simple syrup.

"Invert" sugars are those sugars that are fluid at room temperature. Honey, Corn syrup, molasses, etc.
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Old 09-29-2005, 07:36 AM   #13
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Quote:
Sounds like he's making a basic simple syrup
My thoughts too My mom always made that as a poor-man's pancake syrup. Licia, is the ratio of water to sugar different than a classic sugar syrup?
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Old 09-29-2005, 08:08 AM   #14
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We use roughly 2 sugar to 1 Water, which means, for example 2kg of sugar to 1 litre of water.... is that the same as your basic sugar syrup?
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Old 09-29-2005, 09:34 AM   #15
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Re: Frozen Accompaniments for Blueberries

For the past 12 years, nearly every batch of cooked-custard ice cream I’ve churned out, has contained skim milk powder. I always modify ice cream recipes to include the milk powder in the custard base. Why? Together with egg yolks, skim milk powder creates ice cream that is smooth, properly textured, and rich tasting. The powder’s protein aids stabilization of the emulsion without adding fat. So, you can use half cream & half skim milk to produce excellent ice creams! It really is one of the golden keys to making first-class ice creams.


Re Cinnamon-Peach I.C., would you prefer a French-style (i.e., using crème-anglaise base) or a Philadelphia-style (i.e., eggless)?

More or less typically, a peach custard i.c. would include:

3 ripe peaches
½ cup superfine sugar
1 cup purified water
1½ quarts crème-anglaise (cooked w/ cinnamon bark, then strained)



A Philadelphia-style version is well-represented by Bruce Weinstein’s formula, which includes…

1½ cups heavy cream
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large, peeled-&-pitted peaches
¼ cup peach nectar
¼ tsp vanilla extract


[Source: The Ultimate Ice Cream Book (Morrow, 1999); p. 97f.]

For a buttermilk (eggless) representation, please see the delicious recipe on Rick Rodgers’ Web site. (He remains one of my favorite contemporary food writers.) Although I have checked recently to verify, I should think it very probable that Emeril Lagasse also offers peach ice cream recipes on his expansive pages.

I have a recipe for cinnamon i.c. in a European book that looks dependably accurate.

For other excellent ice creams compatible with blueberry desserts, refer to the "Creamy Peach I.C." in Southern Living: 30 Years of our Best Recipes (p. 100); "Banana-Rum I.C. (Gourmet - April, 1991);"Pina Colada I.C." in Southern Living’s Cool It With Dessert; the cinnamon-flavored "Dulce de Leche I.C." in 125 Best Ice Cream Recipes by Marilyn Linton; and two ginger ice creams: Saveur (Jan./Feb., 1996) & Gourmet (Nov., 1998).

"French Bread w/ Peach Compote & Cinnamon I. C." is a splendid composition from Dutch chef Jonnie Boer:

http://www.globalchefs.com/recipe/dessert/web/des019frew.htm


Sorbets, too, can hit the mark served with blueberries: "Tangerine-Raspberry" in Mable & Bar Hoffman, The Ice Cream & Frozen Yogurt Cookbook (2004); "Peach-Bellini" in Frozen Desserts by C. Liddell & Robin Weir; "Sorbet aux Poires" in Le Cordon Bleu at Home (p. 237). A banana frozen yogurt would also scoop nicely with blueberries.

Here's my Blueberry-Rhubarb Sauce (that's also great on oat-bran waffles):
1 quart fresh or unthawed frozen wild blueberries (highbush blueberriess, even if they’re organically grown, are flavorless)
1 quart chopped strawberry-variety rhubarb
4 cups granulated white sugar
½ cup purified water (if needed)

In large, heavy saucepan, stir berries & rhubarb together. Place over low flame and cook, stirring often, until the liquid starts to ooze from the fruit. Add the sugar, tasting to determine if the mixture is sweet enough. Now, if the fruit is quite dry, you may have to add some water to prevent scorching. Continue to cook until the fruit has broken down somewhat, showing the consistency of a pourable sauce. Cool slightly before serving; refrigerate the remainder.

[Please note: I've edited this post several times, attempting to adjust the point size of the Arial font. I can only post to discusscooking.com in MS Internet Explorer; all my other online work is done using Firefox. Strangely, the appearance of my posts in this forum is quite different from how they appear in Firefox (Which is to say, Ff gives the superior rendition.) So, it may take several more adjustments to reach the ideal method for providing optimal readability. -- Lawrence)







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Old 09-29-2005, 09:56 AM   #16
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What a truly awesome, informative and helpful (not to mention mouth watering) post Konditor, thank-you soooo much!!!

You went to a lot of work putting together that post and I really appreciate it Of the two styles, I think that I would be hard pressed to pick,they both look like they are well worth trying.
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Old 10-02-2005, 05:58 PM   #17
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Smile Thank You AllenMI

I just wanted to say thank you for the recipe, it came out great. My grandma loves it. Thanks again.
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Old 10-02-2005, 09:27 PM   #18
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Thanks! I may be making another batch here soon, and will probably add just a touch of cinnamon to it. I'm curious as what the resulting flavor will be.
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Old 10-02-2005, 09:52 PM   #19
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I'm suddenly craving a blueberry-cinnamon-peach-vanilla dessert....!
Excellent thread, Allen, and wonderful additions, Konditor!

Allen, you've not had blueberries till you've had them with cinnamon!
There's a wonderful breakfast place I love that serves their whole blueberry sauce with cinnamon and cointreau blended in. (This is perfect over blintzes!)
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