"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Pies & Pastries
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-27-2012, 06:05 AM   #31
Sous Chef
 
Cindercat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: DeSoto, MO USA
Posts: 635
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady
I use it mostly for tourtière and make three tourtières at a time and freeze two. That reminds me. I should make some tourtière soon. It's that time of the year and Stirling really likes my tourtière (Madame Benoit's recipe)
Okay, for those of us country folk who don't talk French, what is a tourtiere? :grin:
Does it have ordinary ingredients I can find in an ordinary US grocery store and aren't very expensive? I also don't have alcohol in the house.
__________________

__________________
Cindercat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 08:56 AM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindercat View Post
Okay, for those of us country folk who don't talk French, what is a tourtiere? :grin:
Does it have ordinary ingredients I can find in an ordinary US grocery store and aren't very expensive? I also don't have alcohol in the house.
It's a French Canadian meat pie. Here's my recipe: Tourtiere
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 12:19 PM   #33
Sous Chef
 
Cindercat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: DeSoto, MO USA
Posts: 635
Sounds good. I'll have to try it sometime. Does it freeze well? Three pies would be way too much for just me or even shared with my parents. There isn't a butcher shop around here so I'd have to buy 1 lb. packages of meat anyway. I guess I could reduce the recipe and make a meatloaf with the extra meat.
__________________
Cindercat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 03:37 PM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindercat View Post
Sounds good. I'll have to try it sometime. Does it freeze well? Three pies would be way too much for just me or even shared with my parents. There isn't a butcher shop around here so I'd have to buy 1 lb. packages of meat anyway. I guess I could reduce the recipe and make a meatloaf with the extra meat.
It freezes great. Yes, it would be too much for you and your parents. You can make a filling meal with one piece (1/8 of a pie) of tourtière, gravy, some taters, and some pickled beets. That's the traditional way to serve it. (or with baked beans) Some plain boiled or steamed vegis with butter is not untraditional.

We cut each pie into eight pieces and wrap them individually and freeze them. We usually put the pieces back on the pie plate to freeze, so they don't break. Then when they are frozen, we take them off the pie plate.

We just nuke them to heat them up.

It's not a lot more work to make three pies at once than it is to make one.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 08:55 PM   #35
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
It's a French Canadian meat pie. Here's my recipe: Tourtiere
Depending on where you are, it can be made in a springform pan and includes wild game. Along the coast, it often is made with salmon. The name "tourtiere" comes from the Que. word for pigeon (tourte--my spelling my be off--I am too lazy tonight to dig out my Quebec French dictionary) because the "pies" were often made with pigeon or other fowl.

Tourtiere: A French-Canadian Twist On Christmas Pie : The Salt : NPR

MM #8 – Savory Cakes – Tourtière Bonne Femme | Foodfreak
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 08:57 PM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
The lard will be objectionable if you are feeding any Jewish friends who keep kosher, and if you have any Muslim friends, the lard and the vodka together would be a double whammy.
I don't have any friends for whom I would bake a pie who are either.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 09:21 PM   #37
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Depending on where you are, it can be made in a springform pan and includes wild game. Along the coast, it often is made with salmon. The name "tourtiere" comes from the Que. word for pigeon (tourte--my spelling my be off--I am too lazy tonight to dig out my Quebec French dictionary) because the "pies" were often made with pigeon or other fowl.

Tourtiere: A French-Canadian Twist On Christmas Pie : The Salt : NPR

MM #8 – Savory Cakes – Tourtière Bonne Femme | Foodfreak
It was the passenger pigeon, which is now extinct. That's why I suggest ground chicken or turkey. Here in Quebec, we often see a "tourtière mix" of ground pork, ground beef, and ground veal in one package. Personally, I don't think the difference between veal and beef is enough to justify the extra expense. Experience has taught me that almost any ground meat can be used, but don't leave out the pork. I have used moose, venison, snowshoe hare, as well as the more ordinary meats. It all works well as long as you don't leave out the pork.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 07:41 AM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
FWIW, ATK did a segment on vodka pie crust. Using alcohol for 1/2 of the liquid works for a flaky, tender pie crust because alcohol doesn't bind with the protein (gluten) in the flour, only 1/2 of the alcohol is water, so you use less water, which results in less gluten. The alcohol evaporates while cooking. The ATK site probably explains it better than I can. I couldn't find this thread fast enough to quote the guy.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
butter, pie, crust

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.