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Old 03-11-2012, 01:07 AM   #91
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The big question is whether your day job pays better, or if your off job might have big growth potential. I can see it now: Jonny Jonny's UK Pastie Shoppe!!! Moscow, London, New York and Tokyo... Coming soon to Los Angeles and Buenos Aires!
Loving it!!! I can already see the neon signs above the shop door Maybe it's not a dream after all?? Maybe it's just meant to be??

But seriously, yes my day job pays ok or else I would not be living in a very overcrowded city, minus temperatures in the winter, smoke and smog in the summer and 8 million people going in and out of the metro in the morning going to work with no sign of a smile. No, hold on, it's not really that bad here and not just the money but I can think of better places to be if you know what I mean? I would just like to start a business that I'm passionate about and that's food and here in Moscow it's big trade and still not too late to come up with new ideas as Moscow is still changing even though it's changed dramatically over the last 15 years. I'm just a small fish in a large ocean though so it will probably just remain a dream and in a years time when I see Igor Borisov's Pasty shop I'll be gutted
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:10 AM   #92
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Actually Jonny Jonny's wouldn't make a bad restaurant chain name.
I think you need to be my business partner with ideas like that Now you have even got me saying that over and over in my head "Let's head over to Jonny Jonny's tonight and tuck into a steaming hot pasty"
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:12 AM   #93
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I have thought of purchasing a lunch truck, having it vinyl wrapped as a giant rolling Union Jack, and doing simple English workers food. Do Pasties, Pork pies, pork sandwiches with crackings, PROPER Fish 'n Chips in newspaper, PROPER Scotch Eggs, and maybe some treacle for desert. The lunch truck market is HUGE in DC(and most every other major city), and there isn't anything like it, yet you have lunch trucks getting $22 for a lobster roll and fries, all day. . .just ridiculous.


Not sure if it has been mentioned, but a proper Cornish pastie has a large pastry rim/fold, so that the workers could hold it BY the pastry rim, and eat the rest without getting it dirty from their hands.
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:15 AM   #94
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JJUK I've never been to Moscow or RU at all but I've read many novels set in Moscow and it seems like a pretty dreary place, particularly in winter (at least from the novels). Out of my list of cities I nominated for your first openings perhaps all of them are preferable to Moscow.
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:17 AM   #95
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I think you and I are a lot alike--you're probably retired too or at least have a lot of free time
I'm still a few years away from retiring (and with the hit that my 401k and investments have taken in the last few years, it may be longer now) but I do have the advantage of working from home quite a bit. So it's very easy to roll out of bed early in the day, get my work done, and then have three or four hours to futz around in the kitchen. Sometimes I'll even whip up bread or throw meals together late at night.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:02 PM   #96
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What a fun thread!

I've been taking baby steps with baking the past two months. Pasties look and sound so good, I think I've found my first attempt at a dough. I'm resigned in advance that they'll be ugly, maybe an affront to tradition. The practical purpose of crimping is to seal the pasty, right? and any technique less than a 100% seal will be an oven disaster? As long as it works, I can use a sledgehammer as my crimping tool?

Thanks for the recipe, JJ, you made it look doable for me.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:19 PM   #97
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And I meant Addie, sorry Just getting a busy thread and I got confuzzled
No apology necessary. Go for your dream. You will never know unless you try. I love that word confuzzled. Start out with trying them on your friends. Your first ones you may have to eat yourself to hide the evidence of your mistakes. But the more you make the better you will get. Have a party with the pasties as the main item for the night. Pasties make for an excellent food for those cold winter days. Just remember, flour and bread products are not to happy with being nuked. They need to be heated up in a small or conventional oven. Good Luck!
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:25 PM   #98
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What a fun thread!

I've been taking baby steps with baking the past two months. Pasties look and sound so good, I think I've found my first attempt at a dough. I'm resigned in advance that they'll be ugly, maybe an affront to tradition. The practical purpose of crimping is to seal the pasty, right? and any technique less than a 100% seal will be an oven disaster? As long as it works, I can use a sledgehammer as my crimping tool?

Thanks for the recipe, JJ, you made it look doable for me.
You can use a sledge but, if you miss you will have a big mess Egg wash the inside edges and crimp with the tines of a fork, works great! Work up to the fancy crimping.
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Old 03-11-2012, 06:13 PM   #99
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Oh yes! But then I was raised by wolves... If a food is served with top and bottom bread, it should be picked up. It that is inappropriate the restaurant should not serve it that way, it should be open face.
...
I think Emily Post would agree with that. In Denmark the sandwiches are usually open-faced and eaten with a fork and knife, even in the cafeteria. Okay, some of them are so loaded it would be hard to pick them up.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:07 PM   #100
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I think Emily Post would agree with that. In Denmark the sandwiches are usually open-faced and eaten with a fork and knife, even in the cafeteria. Okay, some of them are so loaded it would be hard to pick them up.
I think it makes sense that open faced sandwiches should be eaten with knife and fork, while sandwiches served between two pieces of bread or bun should be picked up. I think Ms. Post would agree that the most important thing in eating etiquette is to not be nor appear awkward. That's what the "rules" of etiquette are all about, not appearing awkward and not embarrassing yourself or your company by awkward behavior.
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Cornish Pasties [B][CENTER]Cornish Pasties.[/CENTER][/B] [B]Ingredients[/B] 250g Plain flour 125g butter pinch salt Iced water Beef skirt steak Potatoes Onion Salt & pepper egg butter First make the pastry. Start by freezing the butter and putting the water in the freezer until it starts to form ice. Sieve the flower into a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Grate the frozen butter into the flour and bring it together roughly but gently with a fork, add the iced water a bit at a time until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl and starts to come together. Make it into a ball and cover in cling film and let to rest in the fridge for thirty minutes or so. Prepare the filling. Chop the onion finely, peel and cube the potato chop the beef into small pieces and dredge in seasoned flour. Remove the pastry from the fridge and divide into four, roll out on a floured surface into a round disc the size of a tea plate. Place the potato cubes in the middle and top with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the onion on top and again another sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the meat on top then cut a few fine slivers of butter and lay this on top of the meat. Brush the edges of the pastry with egg wash and bring together and crimp with your fingers. Place on a baking tray and coat the outside with generous amounts of egg wash to get a nice golden colour. Place into the oven on 180c for approx 45 minutes or until nice and golden brown, place on a wire rack and leave to cool slightly. Enjoy:chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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