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Old 03-09-2012, 04:49 AM   #21
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Question. Didn'[t the original pasties have one half veggies and meat and the other half dessert? And the pie crust had a sort of thick handle on one end to protect the food from the coal dust of miners hands? Oh all right. Two questons? Do they still make them that way? Three questions. I get carried away.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:21 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Question. Didn'[t the original pasties have one half veggies and meat and the other half dessert? And the pie crust had a sort of thick handle on one end to protect the food from the coal dust of miners hands? Oh all right. Two questons? Do they still make them that way? Three questions. I get carried away.
You can ask as many questions as you like Addie:) Whether I'm correct or not who knows:) As with lots of food origins and history it's always open to discussion which is what I love about food and cooking! It has been said that years ago they filled their pasties with half sweet and half savoury so they had two meals in one but history more suggests that a pasty consisted of swede, potato and onion because in the 16th and 17th century it was considered to be the food eaten by poorer working families such as the tin miners in Cornwall and it was only at a later stage the meat was added.

Your correct about the handle - the traditional pasty is crimped and forms a crust around the pasty that served as a handle for the miners to hold and not get their dirty hands on the pasty and they would throw the crust over their shoulders for the tommyknockers (otherworld spirits that lived in the mines) it served as a gift to appease the mischevious spirits in the mine.

I know mine didn't really have this handle(crust) on them but I tried I need now to learn how to do the crimping properly so they turn out better next time but I'll still eat with clean hands:)
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:24 AM   #23
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Nice one Jonny - loving the receep and the photos. I use the cold butter from freezer trick too for my pastry. Bolas probably stole it from me when I wasnt looking.
Thanks very much GQ:) The most important thing is that we have the secret trick and it works

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JJ fantastic food porn at its best. Thankfully I the wet pat on my lap is dribble for a few moments I thought I had a senior.........................i'll get my coat.
Cheers Bolas!:) It was rather pornographic and I'll forgive you for your senior moment Taxi for Bolassssssssssssssssssssssssss!!!
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Old 03-09-2012, 06:00 AM   #24
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Thanks Johnny for the answer. I love history. Whether it be food, travel, countries, etc. One time I set out on a mission to learn the all about the English Royal family and their line of lineage. I started with William the Conqueror right to Elisabeth II. I kept the library busy getting books for me. An anyone who knows me never asks me about the histor of Boston. I could go on and on.
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Old 03-09-2012, 06:25 AM   #25
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Your more than welcome Addie:) I'm also the same, I love history of food and different countries, I've just started reading the Conde Nast and National Geographic travel magazines and packed full of interesting information, also the Saveur magazine gives some great info about food history and origins.

Last month I watched a series of tv programs by Jamie Oliver (I forgot the name of the series) He was touring around Britain and cooking up dishes famous for each area but he explained how they originated somewhere completely different but were just bought in by foreign workers in that area. I never realised that the humble hamburger started off here in Russia:)
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:13 AM   #26
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Your more than welcome Addie:) I'm also the same, I love history of food and different countries, I've just started reading the Conde Nast and National Geographic travel magazines and packed full of interesting information, also the Saveur magazine gives some great info about food history and origins.

Last month I watched a series of tv programs by Jamie Oliver (I forgot the name of the series) He was touring around Britain and cooking up dishes famous for each area but he explained how they originated somewhere completely different but were just bought in by foreign workers in that area. I never realised that the humble hamburger started off here in Russia:)
The question here is...do you eat your hamburger with knife and fork or do you pick it up and eat it like we do in the US?
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:34 AM   #27
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This is what my pasties look like. I use the ever so fancy fork crimping method. And, they are always served with ketchup. To Fiona's question, we eat ours with knife and fork, but could easily be eaten out of hand if not cut open for a pic.
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:48 AM   #28
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The question here is...do you eat your hamburger with knife and fork or do you pick it up and eat it like we do in the US?

There not big on hamburgers here in Russia PF and the hamburger originated from the Russian steak tartare so that is eaten a lot here. Of course there are now many restaurants serving hamburgers and endless amounts of McDonalds restaurants around so the locals eat them but if your talking about in the home then not many cook them.

I'm a pick it up with your hands kind of guy when it comes to burgers and ribs etc so in answer to your question as an English guy, I eat a hamburger with my hands:)
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:52 AM   #29
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This is what my pasties look like. I use the ever so fancy fork crimping method. And, they are always served with ketchup. To Fiona's question, we eat ours with knife and fork, but could easily be eaten out of hand if not cut open for a pic.
They look lovely Hammster!!! I also ate mine with some tomato ketchup but if I had some on hand I'm partial to HP Brown sauce on mine:)

I like your fork crimping style and that would of probably been easier to do rather than doing with my fingers but next time I'm going to attempt this style of crimping...........

I think PrincessFiona was relating to hamburgers when she said how do you eat them but I like to also eat pasties with my hands when served on there own but as a meal with veg etc then I'm a knife and fork guy:)
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:53 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by jonnyjonny_uk View Post
There not big on hamburgers here in Russia PF and the hamburger originated from the Russian steak tartare so that is eaten a lot here. Of course there are now many restaurants serving hamburgers and endless amounts of McDonalds restaurants around so the locals eat them but if your talking about in the home then not many cook them.

I'm a pick it up with your hands kind of guy when it comes to burgers and ribs etc so in answer to your question as an English guy, I eat a hamburger with my hands:)
I was wondering because I had heard that US tourists in England are considered uncouth for picking up their burgers and eating them. It must have been the setting they were in, they did say they were in a restaurant and not a fast food place.
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Cornish Pasties [B][CENTER]Cornish Pasties.[/CENTER][/B] [B]Ingredients[/B] 250g Plain flour 125g butter pinch salt Iced water Beef skirt steak Potatoes Onion Salt & pepper egg butter First make the pastry. Start by freezing the butter and putting the water in the freezer until it starts to form ice. Sieve the flower into a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Grate the frozen butter into the flour and bring it together roughly but gently with a fork, add the iced water a bit at a time until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl and starts to come together. Make it into a ball and cover in cling film and let to rest in the fridge for thirty minutes or so. Prepare the filling. Chop the onion finely, peel and cube the potato chop the beef into small pieces and dredge in seasoned flour. Remove the pastry from the fridge and divide into four, roll out on a floured surface into a round disc the size of a tea plate. Place the potato cubes in the middle and top with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the onion on top and again another sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the meat on top then cut a few fine slivers of butter and lay this on top of the meat. Brush the edges of the pastry with egg wash and bring together and crimp with your fingers. Place on a baking tray and coat the outside with generous amounts of egg wash to get a nice golden colour. Place into the oven on 180c for approx 45 minutes or until nice and golden brown, place on a wire rack and leave to cool slightly. Enjoy:chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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