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Old 03-11-2012, 12:00 AM   #81
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We get a lot of tourists from the UK. They end up at Fanuiel Hall. Your typical tourist trap. My favorite place to watch women try to manage the cobble stones in high heels. It would be an ideal place for someone to start up a stand for pasties.
Am I the only person who understands the double entendres possible with the word "pasties."

Pasty (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Considering other interpretations the description above is a bit ROTFLAMO.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:00 AM   #82
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What route did you take in the end Steve with regards to the filling?
I decided to go mostly traditional and used a mix of skirt steak, potato, swede, onion, and minced garlic.

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Old 03-11-2012, 12:02 AM   #83
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I decided to go mostly traditional and used a mix of skirt steak, potato, swede, onion, and minced garlic.

You just made that? Today?
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:04 AM   #84
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Am I the only person who understands the double entendres possible with the word "pasties."

Pasty (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Considering other interpretations the description above is a bit ROTFLAMO.
No. I had the same thought. But I think it would be safe to say that pasties originally referred to food of the Cornish miners. They were mining long before vaudville came into being.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:07 AM   #85
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You just made that? Today?
No, I made FIVE of them today. They were enormous. DW and I split one for dinner. I'll probably be eating them for lunch for the next few days.

By the way, the one on the bottom right was my first crimping attempt. Can you tell, lol??

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Old 03-11-2012, 12:28 AM   #86
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We get a lot of tourists from the UK. They end up at Fanuiel Hall. Your typical tourist trap. My favorite place to watch women try to manage the cobble stones in high heels. It would be an ideal place for someone to start up a stand for pasties. Of course they couldn't call them Cornwall Pasties. Perhaps Miner's Pasties. The problem is trying to get a spot there. There is a waiting list. In the meantime they could get a vendor's street license.

Our stupid Mayor Mummbles Mennino tried to stop all street vendors from selling at the Goverment Center Plaza. Between City Hall and the JFK Federal Office Buuilding, there are thousands of employees pouring out at lunch time that buy their lunch at these stands. His idea didn't get any support and was quicly voted down by the public and the City Council. It woud be an ideal spot for the pasties.
PF that really started me thinking! Here in Russia they are big on there pies (пирог - Pirog) with mostly sweet fillings such as cottage cheese, apple, berries and plums and also savoury like mushroom, potato, fish and meat but even though a pie they're nothing like a pasty and not as tasty. Now I'm thinking how successful a Pasty shop would be here in Moscow, not just for the locals but for the thousands of expats like myself that are here!! I could always start making a few and take them into the office and see the response?:) Actually, we have a small canteen in our office building and maybe I could make some for her to sell as this gets a steady stream of people everyday and see how they sell............thoughts thoughts thoughts.......dreams dreams dreams!
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:32 AM   #87
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I decided to go mostly traditional and used a mix of skirt steak, potato, swede, onion, and minced garlic.

They look delicious Steve, after tasting mine using the traditional ingredients it seems a shame to start messing around with ingredients because they are so tasty and a meal in themselves!

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No, I made FIVE of them today. They were enormous. DW and I split one for dinner. I'll probably be eating them for lunch for the next few days.

By the way, the one on the bottom right was my first crimping attempt. Can you tell, lol??

If they last a few days you have good willpower

You certainly picked it up fast if that was your first attempt, Respect!!!
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:41 AM   #88
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No, I made FIVE of them today. They were enormous. DW and I split one for dinner. I'll probably be eating them for lunch for the next few days.

By the way, the one on the bottom right was my first crimping attempt. Can you tell, lol??
I think you and I are a lot alike--you're probably retired too or at least have a lot of free time--except I don't have any decent kitchen. I would have been sorely tempted to try making these pasties too today, or torn between them and one of the recipes out of my recently (and temporarily) acquired Pioneer Woman cookbook. Perhaps by summer I'll be fixed up with a good kitchen and pantry, and hopefully a large enough audience that I don't have to eat all the food myself.

Yes I can tell the BR is your first attempt but you did climb up the learning curve very quickly!
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:51 AM   #89
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PF that really started me thinking! Here in Russia they are big on there pies (пирог - Pirog) with mostly sweet fillings such as cottage cheese, apple, berries and plums and also savoury like mushroom, potato, fish and meat but even though a pie they're nothing like a pasty and not as tasty. Now I'm thinking how successful a Pasty shop would be here in Moscow, not just for the locals but for the thousands of expats like myself that are here!! I could always start making a few and take them into the office and see the response?:) Actually, we have a small canteen in our office building and maybe I could make some for her to sell as this gets a steady stream of people everyday and see how they sell............thoughts thoughts thoughts.......dreams dreams dreams!
And I meant Addie, sorry Just getting a busy thread and I got confuzzled
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:59 AM   #90
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Actually, we have a small canteen in our office building and maybe I could make some for her to sell as this gets a steady stream of people everyday and see how they sell............thoughts thoughts thoughts.......dreams dreams dreams!
The big question is whether your day job pays better, or if your off job might have big growth potential. I can see it now: Jonny Jonny's Olde UK Pastie Shoppe!!! Moscow, London, New York and Tokyo... Coming soon to Los Angeles, Paris, Madrid, Rome and Buenos Aires!

Actually Jonny Jonny's wouldn't make a bad restaurant chain name.
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Cornish Pasties [B][CENTER]Cornish Pasties.[/CENTER][/B] [B]Ingredients[/B] 250g Plain flour 125g butter pinch salt Iced water Beef skirt steak Potatoes Onion Salt & pepper egg butter First make the pastry. Start by freezing the butter and putting the water in the freezer until it starts to form ice. Sieve the flower into a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Grate the frozen butter into the flour and bring it together roughly but gently with a fork, add the iced water a bit at a time until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl and starts to come together. Make it into a ball and cover in cling film and let to rest in the fridge for thirty minutes or so. Prepare the filling. Chop the onion finely, peel and cube the potato chop the beef into small pieces and dredge in seasoned flour. Remove the pastry from the fridge and divide into four, roll out on a floured surface into a round disc the size of a tea plate. Place the potato cubes in the middle and top with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the onion on top and again another sprinkle of salt and pepper, place the meat on top then cut a few fine slivers of butter and lay this on top of the meat. Brush the edges of the pastry with egg wash and bring together and crimp with your fingers. Place on a baking tray and coat the outside with generous amounts of egg wash to get a nice golden colour. Place into the oven on 180c for approx 45 minutes or until nice and golden brown, place on a wire rack and leave to cool slightly. Enjoy:chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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