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Old 05-31-2014, 11:37 PM   #11
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For me, custard pie is the easiest one I make. I make two to three of them a week. My recipe does seem to be different than those posted. A man on Road Food made my recipe and really liked it. Hope it works for you as easily as it works for me.

Mix together with a whip:
6 eggs
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla
2 cups milk
Sprinkle with nutmeg
Bake in an unbaked pie shell about 45 minutes at 350

I don't blind bake the crust or anything.
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Old 06-01-2014, 02:30 AM   #12
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Remember, "Baking Is A Science". You have to stick to the rules unless you are a very experienced baker. If the recipe says to 'scald' the milk, then you have to scald the milk. If the recipe calls for milk, it most likely means whole milk. If the person who wrote the recipe meant 1%, the recipe would have said 1%. All recipes means 'large' eggs. If they want you to use extra large, the recipe will state so.

I would also suggest that you try to watch some baking shows on TV. Every time they do a step, the hostess will give you the rule and reason for the it. And if it sounds like you may want to try the recipe, they will tell you where to get it on line.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:53 PM   #13
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Well, I do a cheater's custard. Works perfectly and it's easy and, nearly fool proof.

2 C whole milk - cold
4 Egg yolks
1/2 C. sugar
2 Tbs butter - no need to soften.
1 tsp vanilla (use this for any flavor you are making)
1.5 tsp any flavor you like (more vanilla if you want vanilla custard) OR 4 TBS cocoa powder for chocolate custard.

Put everything in a saucepan and whisk to combine well then, put it over medium to medium low heat and keep whisking until it comes to a boil for about 2-3 minutes. That takes 15 to 20 min total to make custard.

It fills a 9 inch pie (blind bake the crust first) or can be served warm or cold as custard.

For a quick pie, do chocolate or vanilla custard in a Oreo crust, top with the alternate (chocolate or vanilla) whipped cream. No baking at all but, you get custard pie. :)
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:36 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Also, there is a difference between a tart and a pie. The OP stated that the problem was with a custard pie recipe.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Custard "tart" and custard "pie" are interchangeable names for the same thing. ("Tart" being a more modern usage for an open "pie" - modern in the sense of 17th/18th century usage). Unless you are telling me that you have two different dishes over there? It was clear from the OP's post that s/he was dealing with an open pastry case with an egg custard filling.

S/he asked for help. As a custard tart/pie maker of some experience I gave it and then tried to clear up some confusion that may have arisen in the OP's mind by some of the other answers.
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:53 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Custard "tart" and custard "pie" are interchangeable names for the same thing. ("Tart" being a more modern usage for an open "pie" - modern in the sense of 17th/18th century usage). Unless you are telling me that you have two different dishes over there? It was clear from the OP's post that s/he was dealing with an open pastry case with an egg custard filling.

S/he asked for help. As a custard tart/pie maker of some experience I gave it and then tried to clear up some confusion that may have arisen in the OP's mind by some of the other answers.
Pies and tarts are not the same thing here. Here's a good explanation of the differences, with pictures of the pans used for each: http://www.thekitchn.com/pie-vs-tart...differen-68710
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:40 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Pies and tarts are not the same thing here. Here's a good explanation of the differences, with pictures of the pans used for each: Pie vs. Tart: What's the Difference? | The Kitchn

I would argue that tarts are a type of pie. The definition of pie given in the link is way too specific and appears tailored to create differences vs. the tart.

The differences described are typical in describing pies vs. tarts.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:48 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I would argue that tarts are a type of pie. The definition of pie given in the link is way too specific and appears tailored to create differences vs. the tart.

The differences described are typical in describing pies vs. tarts.
There are other pages that describe the same thing, if you don't like this one ;-) I would agree that tarts are a type of pie, but they're still different things. Pies have sloped sides and are deeper; tarts have straight sides, only one crust, and are often made in a pan with removable sides to preserve the integrity of the crust.
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Old 06-03-2014, 10:58 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
There are other pages that describe the same thing, if you don't like this one ;-) I would agree that tarts are a type of pie, but they're still different things. Pies have sloped sides and are deeper; tarts have straight sides, only one crust, and are often made in a pan with removable sides to preserve the integrity of the crust.
I agree there are differences and that the factors you listed are often true. I make a cheesecake with a graham cracker crust in a pan with removable sides. It has only one crust and is not a tart. It's a pie.

Then again, the gallette has no pan at all and is a pie.
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Old 06-03-2014, 11:22 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I agree there are differences and that the factors you listed are often true. I make a cheesecake with a graham cracker crust in a pan with removable sides. It has only one crust and is not a tart. It's a pie.

Then again, the gallette has no pan at all and is a pie.
As with so many things, it's not 100% cut and dried. Remember the roasted vs. braised discussion? ;-)
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Old 06-03-2014, 11:31 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
As with so many things, it's not 100% cut and dried. Remember the roasted vs. braised discussion? ;-)
The reason for my dispute is that the linked definition was too specific to be a good definition.

If you want to define "pie" you have to write an all inclusive definition. The business about pans with slanted sides or flaky crusts is too specific for a definition of pie.
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