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Old 07-30-2011, 04:39 PM   #11
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I bet that Crisco is worse for you than lard.

Trans fats seem to be worse for you than saturated fats, no matter what the label says it is still mostly transfats (hydrogenated oil). There seems to be no safe amount of trans fats, but most can tolerate a moderate amount of saturated fats.

This is my opinion and take it for what you will, but our bodies know what to do with plant based and animal based saturated fats, but hydrogenated fats like Crisco are "engineered" products no longer in their natural state and our bodies were never meant to eat them, potentially causing us problems.

I'm not a doctor or a scientist, but for me the closer you can eat foods to their natural state, the better, the less "engineered" the better.
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Old 03-16-2013, 06:34 AM   #12
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I have bumped this because I caught a cooking show that was all about pie crust. I always add 1 tsp of vinegar to my crust and use 1/2 lard, 1/2 Crisco or butter (and often 1 tsp vodka, but not always). My grandma and great aunt always used lard and Crisco (cold), ice water, and vinegar. What I did not know was that the vinegar inhibits the formation of gluten so you end up with a crust that is tender. I have to say, I have been making pie crust since I was knee-high to a grasshopper and have never had a tough pie crust. It is one of the things that I make very well--always flaky. I have to thank my gran and great aunt for that. I've made whole wheat flour crusts using my grandma's recipe and it has been as tender and flaky as those I have made with AP flour.
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Old 03-16-2013, 11:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
You are right, lard has been villified. I figure that since I only make pies at the most once a month (if that often) and no one ever has more than two slices from each pie we are not getting enough lard to cause a problem. We probably get way more meat fat from the bacon and sausage that we eat. Frankly, that lovely flaky lard pie crust is worth the risk to me.
Aside from the "Gasp! FAT!! Oh, my!!" squad having the vapors over lard, there is the somewhat more rational note that commercial lard, meaning all you will find in grocery stores, likely uses some fat from less desirable cuts, and is subject to all sorts of bleaching and other chemical processes and preservatives. It may not be your worst fear, if you don't east much lard, but if you do, perhaps being picky about your daily biscuits, it's worth locating a source of good, leaf lard, plain open kettle rendered from fat around kidneys and loins. I can get it locally, but that's unusual. If you search LEAF LARD, Google will find you a couple of online sources. Expect to pay $8 to $15 a pound, plus shipping.
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Old 03-17-2013, 07:51 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by GLC View Post
Aside from the "Gasp! FAT!! Oh, my!!" squad having the vapors over lard, there is the somewhat more rational note that commercial lard, meaning all you will find in grocery stores, likely uses some fat from less desirable cuts, and is subject to all sorts of bleaching and other chemical processes and preservatives. It may not be your worst fear, if you don't east much lard, but if you do, perhaps being picky about your daily biscuits, it's worth locating a source of good, leaf lard, plain open kettle rendered from fat around kidneys and loins. I can get it locally, but that's unusual. If you search LEAF LARD, Google will find you a couple of online sources. Expect to pay $8 to $15 a pound, plus shipping.
Excellent points and wonderful/hilarious photo.
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