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Old 01-04-2020, 09:50 AM   #1
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Key Lime Pie

Key Lime Pie

1 cup plus 2 1/2 TB . graham-cracker crumbs
5 TB. unsalted butter, melted
1/3 cup sugar
3 egg yolks
1 1/2 tsp. grated lime zest
1 (14 oz.) can sweetened condensed milk
2/3 cup fresh Key Lime juice
1 cup heavy cream
3 TB. confectioners' sugar

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, combine graham crackers, butter and sugar. Press mixture into bottom and sides of a buttered 9" pie pan, forming a neat border around edge. Bake crust about 5 minutes or until set and golden.
2. Using an electric mixer with a whisk attachment and a nonreactive bowl, beat egg yolks and lime zest at high speed about 5 minutes or until very shiny. Gradually add condensed milk, and continue to beat 3 or 4 minutes or until thick. Reduce speed of mixer to low. Add lime juice and mix just until combined.
3. Pour lime mixture into crust. Bake about 10 minutes or until filling has just set. Cool to room temperature, then refrigerate.
4. To serve, place pie in freezer for 15 to 20 minutes before serving. In an electric-mixer bowl, combine cream and confectioners' sugar. Whisk until nearly stiff. Cut pie into wedges; serve very cold, each wedge topped with large dollop of whipped cream. Makes 8 servings.

Source: Recipe adapted from Joe's Stone Crab, Miami Beach - Sun Sentinal-February 1998

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Old 01-04-2020, 03:41 PM   #2
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I love key lime pie. But did you know tat you can swap out the key lime juice with other citrus juices? I even cooked fown the straied ruhvarb, and used the ruhbarb juice I lovd this with grapefruit jice as well.

The filling is the same basic custard for all of these. You could probably use macerated berries as well.

I wonder if you could make a fruity panacota in a baked graham cracker crust thzt had been sealed with egg wash. Hmm.

Oh, and you recipe looks spot on.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-04-2020, 03:49 PM   #3
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Thanks, I bet it would taste good with orange juice also, and cranberries, and str........and the list goes on. lol I was surprised how I liked it with the Key lime juice as opposed to lime juice tho.
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Old 01-04-2020, 03:50 PM   #4
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That's the recipe I've always used, and like the Chief, I've also used the juice from my Meyer lemon tree. I love citrus sweets.
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Old 01-04-2020, 05:33 PM   #5
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That's the recipe I've always used, and like the Chief, I've also used the juice from my Meyer lemon tree. I love citrus sweets.
Same here, made it with kumquats once and ruby red grapefruit.
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Old 01-11-2020, 06:17 AM   #6
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Thanks for sharing the recipe!
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Old 01-13-2020, 08:03 AM   #7
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Key Lime is one of my all time favorites too. Heck....Lemon and Orange too.

I have the old recipe collections of my beloved late family and several are actually recipe bearing post cards from Florida. It seems that back in the day
those who vacationed would send back communications from where ever they were and even send boxes or baskets of citrus fruit soon after. An interesting way of sharing the vacation those back home.

Post cards looked like these:

Orange



Key Lime



Lemon

Whenever Lemon Meringue pie is mentioned I can't help but think of this product. I grew up with it and it was one of the steps in my learning to cook.

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Old 01-13-2020, 11:48 AM   #8
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Hi RC, you are so right. Your post brings back a lot of memories for me also. Like everyone says, there are a lot of different fruits to use, but nothing beats real Key Lime Juice. I hope you have access to the FRESH real thing. It does make a big difference.
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Old 01-13-2020, 12:16 PM   #9
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Wish it didn't have so much dairy in it, we'd LOVE that !!!
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Old 01-13-2020, 02:01 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
Hi RC, you are so right. Your post brings back a lot of memories for me also. Like everyone says, there are a lot of different fruits to use, but nothing beats real Key Lime Juice. I hope you have access to the FRESH real thing. It does make a big difference.
Do you have regular access to fresh Key lime juice? From what I read, very few Key limes are produced in Florida anymore because of the limited area where the trees can grow (most groves in the Keys were destroyed by hurricanes or sold for development decades ago) and because of the citrus greening disease. Most Key limes available in the United States are imported from Mexico, which is also having problems with citrus greening. And Mexican growers grow more Persian limes because Americans prefer the larger, seedless fruit.
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:27 PM   #11
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I think most of us are used to citrus pies as flavored curd. Until a few years ago it was the only way I knew it. But a cousin was telling me about being down south of Lexington, KY at Shaker Town near Harrodsburg. In the restaurant there, which is historic with waitstaff dressed as Shakers, you can get this
Lemon pie. My ears still pop when I think of that slice I ate.

It's so sharp you could cut your tongue on it. I'd guess it could be made as Lime or other citrus.

Here's how:

https://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=307183
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:48 PM   #12
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Do you have regular access to fresh Key lime juice? From what I read, very few Key limes are produced in Florida anymore because of the limited area where the trees can grow (most groves in the Keys were destroyed by hurricanes or sold for development decades ago) and because of the citrus greening disease. Most Key limes available in the United States are imported from Mexico, which is also having problems with citrus greening. And Mexican growers grow more Persian limes because Americans prefer the larger, seedless fruit.
Thank goodness there are still Key Limes in the store now and then. A lot of people also grow their own here.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:31 PM   #13
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Several years ago I spied a sack of key limes in the supermarket and bought them. They are a good bit smaller than Persian limes so you have to grate and squeeze a lot of limes to make a pie. The limes didn't have a lot of juice in them.

I've decided to make my pies with Persian limes and deal with the consequences.
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Old 01-13-2020, 08:57 PM   #14
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Several years ago I spied a sack of key limes in the supermarket and bought them. They are a good bit smaller than Persian limes so you have to grate and squeeze a lot of limes to make a pie. The limes didn't have a lot of juice in them.

I've decided to make my pies with Persian limes and deal with the consequences.
Sorry about that Andy. Yes, they are smaller and take more limes. But there are a lot of juicy ones out there. It might depend on the time of year. I have heard that if you stick them in the microwave for a few seconds, that will make them juicier.
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Old 01-14-2020, 02:54 AM   #15
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The Key Lime Pie recipe my Mom got when my Dad was stationed in Florida used a blind-baked pie crust. She never made it with graham cracker crust. You can sub out the sweetened condensed milk for coconut milk--put it in the fridge overnight. A garlic press works great for juicing those little limes. I have made a version of this using clementines/tangerines.
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Key Lime Pie Key Lime Pie 1 cup plus 2 1/2 TB . graham-cracker crumbs 5 TB. unsalted butter, melted 1/3 cup sugar 3 egg yolks 1 1/2 tsp. grated lime zest 1 (14 oz.) can sweetened condensed milk 2/3 cup fresh Key Lime juice 1 cup heavy cream 3 TB. confectioners' sugar 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, combine graham crackers, butter and sugar. Press mixture into bottom and sides of a buttered 9" pie pan, forming a neat border around edge. Bake crust about 5 minutes or until set and golden. 2. Using an electric mixer with a whisk attachment and a nonreactive bowl, beat egg yolks and lime zest at high speed about 5 minutes or until very shiny. Gradually add condensed milk, and continue to beat 3 or 4 minutes or until thick. Reduce speed of mixer to low. Add lime juice and mix just until combined. 3. Pour lime mixture into crust. Bake about 10 minutes or until filling has just set. Cool to room temperature, then refrigerate. 4. To serve, place pie in freezer for 15 to 20 minutes before serving. In an electric-mixer bowl, combine cream and confectioners' sugar. Whisk until nearly stiff. Cut pie into wedges; serve very cold, each wedge topped with large dollop of whipped cream. Makes 8 servings. Source: Recipe adapted from Joe's Stone Crab, Miami Beach - Sun Sentinal-February 1998 3 stars 1 reviews
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