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Old 08-16-2006, 02:23 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMorin
Anyway, I agree with you on the Crisco and I suppose that we have to just do a bit of a balancing act if we want to eat well and have our desert, so to speak.
Yep, everything in moderation. I agree with Alix, that lard is the best for pastry. Butter does add some flavour, shortening (Crisco) adds nothing except less of the "bad" colesterol, but the trade off is not worth the difference in the flakiness of the crust that you get with lard.
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Old 08-27-2006, 06:27 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miandoria
Hi, I see this is an older thread, and I don't know if this is going to work or not, but if you are still interested in pie dough recipes, I have one that my family thinks is the best
Sure, I'd love to see your recipe. Thanks for offering.

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Old 08-27-2006, 07:20 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exactly150
You need to go to kingarthur.com and get their special mellow pastry blend flour. I own a dessert catering business, and that is the only flour I use for all of our pie crusts. they come wonderfully tender.

I'm in the habit of grinding my own flour. I know that I have lots of problems with recipes due to this fact, but that's life. Once I rework, just about every recipe I see with flour in it, then I have a recipe for life - this includes French croissant, I was told it couldn't be done. It has been well worth it, in my esteem there is nothing that tastes better than fresh ground flour, it just takes more time and patients, mainly because there are not recipies out there for home ground flour.

I know of King Aurthers, I have had there catalogue many years ago. They have very nice products...

Thanks
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Old 08-27-2006, 07:43 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaCook
shortening (Crisco) adds nothing except less of the "bad" colesterol, but the trade off is not worth the difference in the flakiness of the crust that you get with lard.
DaCook, you should try Butter Flavored Crisco. That's what I use, and it not only adds flavor, but also a lovely golden color to the piecrust. I think you'll like it. It also makes flakier piecrust than butter.
Michael can tell you why...he's the scientist here.

Of course lard is wonderful...pork fat rules. I just can't handle all that saturated fat.
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:45 AM   #35
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My pie dough tears when i try to lift it up. I was thinking the dough wasn't strong enough. But is there any way to fix this?

I used

2 C. All Purpose Flour
1 1/2 sticks butter
3 tbsp water (but this tends to vary)
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Old 08-28-2006, 09:36 AM   #36
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I had the same problem for years. I found that if I added 2 extra tbs. of ice-water to the dough, it held together wonderfully well without affecting the finished product. Another trick is to laye the pie-pan, inverted, onto the pie crust. Using the pan as a guide, cut a circle from the dough that is one and one/half inch larger that the pan. By removing the iregularities and working with a smooth edge, you minimize weak points that can start from the dough edge and cause a tear.

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Old 08-28-2006, 11:54 AM   #37
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ah. i'll try that.
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Old 08-28-2006, 12:49 PM   #38
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I've had consistently good results with the Flaky Pastry Dough from the 1997 edition of Joy of Cooking, page 859. I mention the edition because this particular recipe is not in the earlier editions of Joy.

The recipe includes a couple of variations, but the one I like uses 2.5 cups of flour, 1 tablespoon of powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1/2 cup of shortening, 8 ounces (1 stick) of butter, 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon ice water, plus 1 to 2 additional tablespoons of ice water if needed. The book includes very specific instructions, which any newbie -- or someone who makes pie once or twice per year -- can follow.
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Old 08-30-2006, 09:44 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Michael can tell you why...he's the scientist here.
I hope you get this Micheal. What, may I ask is the make-up of crisco? The yellow colouring intrigues me. Is it plant based, do you know? I know that in cheese they use Annatto cheese colourant which is plant based.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Of course lard is wonderful...pork fat rules. I just can't handle all that saturated fat.
Who can take the saturated fats, unless you consume enough of the good unsaturated fatty acid, I believe is the way it goes. My wife really knows that kind of thing... She's not here right now.... But doesn't it do great things for food!!!

Take care
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- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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Old 08-30-2006, 09:51 PM   #40
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Crisco is hydrogenated vegetable oil - shortening. If it's yellow, it's probably butter flavored Crisco.
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