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Old 10-30-2004, 07:29 AM   #11
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pst1: thanks. A further benefit is that if you eat them standing up, they are not only calorie-free but also a healthful source of fiber.

Alix: if you get too stressed today, you can skip the frosting and just squirt Hershey's syrup over them. Still good.
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Old 10-30-2004, 09:32 PM   #12
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OK, ate the pudding as pudding cuz my "pastry" came out like rocks. What did I do wrong? I swear to you I did exactly as the recipe said. Did I stir too much? Too little? Oven temp screwy? What the heck is wrong with me? I can make the flakiest pie crust or turnover you ever did see...but a cream puff or eclair...no. I fed them to the dog...she loved them. Sigh.

mudbug...I passed on the Hersheys and went straight for the Kahlua.
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Old 10-30-2004, 09:43 PM   #13
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You teach me how to make a decent flaky pie crust, and I'll teach you how to make an eclair :)
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Old 10-30-2004, 09:45 PM   #14
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Done. Where do you live and lets book a time in one of our respective kitchens. I will bring the pastry blender and some wine.
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Old 10-30-2004, 09:57 PM   #15
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E-D-M-O-N-T-O-N? Where's that? Is that some kind of Indian village in the Yukon? If you ever come to the civilized world (Toronto) I'll be glad to help you out :)
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Old 10-30-2004, 10:41 PM   #16
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"Civilized?" Please.

Still, the offer is open whenever you want to try it out.
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Old 10-31-2004, 12:03 AM   #17
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Alix, I'm sorry they didn't turn out well for you. I' I don't think you can overbeat this pastry - ya hafta beat the eggs in one at a time, fer crissakes, so that can't be it.

Maybe they were in the oven too long? They're supposed to be kinda crispy, but not hard as granite. Sorry, luv, don't know what else to tell ya. Maybe some expert pastry person will respond.

You could have at least squirted a little Hershey's in the Kahlua.....
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Old 10-31-2004, 08:58 AM   #18
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Just a question: what is a "stick" of butter? The grocery store sells butter in either half a pound or full pound "sticks". Is it possible you used the wrong type of stick? (I hate recipes that use airy fairy terms like "stick" and "pinch"; why can't it just say the specific amount?) That's just the only thing I could think of. I would imagine that using a full pound, where only a half pound was required, (or vice versa) could seriously impair your pastry.

Anyway, here's the recipe I have always used for choux pastry; since the first time I made it, it has always worked perfectly. This recipe always goes by the book, although the one quirk is that for some reason, my paste has already seperated and reached 140 F or less after mixing in the flour, and there is never any need for the additional cooking.

1/2 Cup (125 ml) Whole Milk
1/2 Cup (125 ml) Water
6 TBSP (3 oz / 90 g) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1/4 tsp salt
1 Cup (5 oz / 155 g) unbleached ap flour
4 large eggs

In a saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the milk, water, butter, and salt, and bring to a full boil. When the butter melts, remove the pan from the heat, add the flour all at once, and stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until blended. Return the pan to the heat and continue stirring until the mixture leaves the sides of the pan and forms a ball. Remove from the heat and let cool for 3-4 minutes, or until 140 F on an instant-read thermometer.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk 1 egg. When the batter has cooled to 140 F, pour the egg into the batter, and beat with a wooden spoon until incorporated. Add the 3 remaining eggs one at a time by whisking each one first, and then stirring it into the batter. After each egg is added, the mixture seperates and appears shiny, but it returns to a smooth paste with vigorous beating. Let the paste cool for about 10 minutes before shaping.

Preheat oven to 425 F. To shape logs for eclairs, use a piping bag with a 3/4 inch tip, and pipe out logs 4 inches long and 1 inch wide. Space the logs at least 2 inches apart on the pans.

Bake the logs for 15 minutes, then reduce the heat to 375 F, and continue baking until golden brown, about 15-20 minutes longer. Remove from the oven immediately and prick the side of each log with a sharp knife. Return to the oven, leave the oven door open, and allow the pastries to dry out for 10-15 minutes. Let the pastries cool completed on the pans on wire racks before filling.

Makes 10 logs
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Old 10-31-2004, 09:02 AM   #19
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Jasonr, fair point made. Here in the states, butter is sold in quarter-pound, separately-wrapped "sticks" within each box. Tis a colloquial term. In US measurements, a stick is 1/2 cup.
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Old 10-31-2004, 09:57 AM   #20
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OK, butter is not it. I knew to use a 1/2 cup. Maybe I didn't beat well enough? I think perhaps I DID overcook them. Hmmm...maybe this is my issue. I still have some pudding in my cupboard, butterscotch though, maybe I will try this again. I am staying home to hand out candy tonight, and we don't get many munchkins so I will attempt it again. Same recipe...I will try Jason's if this one doesn't work.

WAIT A MINUTE! I used margarine instead of butter! Do you think THAT did it?
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