"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Pies & Pastries
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-20-2005, 05:33 PM   #21
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I used a TNT recipe for years to make my pie crusts. The crusts came out very flaky. But like your experience, I always had to fight the pie crust as it was extremely fragile and broke easily. I followed all of the tips for resting the crust, for using cold ingredients, even for chilling the working surface and rolling pin. Nothing seemed to help.

Now you have to understand that I experiment with things all of the time. I'm kind of famous for that around here. So, as with so many ohter things, I had to find a definitive answer to the problem and began experimenting. What I found was deceptively simple and made it so that I now longer need a recipe and my crust come out perfectly, and are easy to work with. I share the results of my experimenting with everyone here.

Follow your standard recipe, the one that is hard to work with. Add ice water to the pie dough, a little at a time until it holds together better. Just be careful not to overwork the dough as it will make the crust tough. So here's the technique.

Place flour and salt in a bowl. Add shortening , butter, or cooking oil and cut it into the flour until the mixture resembles a bowl full of pea-sized granules. You can mix all you want at this stage and it won't toughen the crust. The gluten doesn't develop until the water is added.

Finally, add three tbs. of ice water to the dough and lightly press into a ball, as if you were making a snowball. If the dough has enough water in it, it will hold together without pieces falling off. If it's too dry, it will be fragile.

If you need to, break the ball into small pieces and add more ice water, two tbs. at a time. Again make into a ball.

Now, roll out the dough, and if it hasn't been worked much, it's ready to be placed into the pie pan. If you have had to add more water several times, the dough will need to rest, to allow the gluten to relax. This will depend on how much dough you've made.

Dough is flaky because the little pea-sized balls are comprised mostly of flour and fat. They don't stick well together. The water softens the flour-starch and makes the little dough wafers (that's what they become when they are rolled flat) stick together better. To much water will make things messy. Too little water will not create the cohesion required to produce a good dough texture. And unfortunately, as I no longer use a recipe, I can't give you exact measurements. I know the dough is right by how it looks, and by its texture. And using this technique, I can always make the right amount of dough for what I'm doing without having to multiply or divide recipe quantities.

Follow your existing recipe and add two tbs. more ice water. This should solve your problem. Then, learn the general ratio of flour to fat, or learn to recognize the texture after cutting the two together, before adding the water. Once you get the knack for it, it becomes second nature, intuitive. Hope this helps.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2005, 06:56 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
callie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,709
Goodweed - that's EXACTLY what my mom says...she "just knows" when it's right. She can tell by look and feel. Thanks for your post. I like learning "why"...
__________________

__________________
Practice random acts of kindness.

callie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2005, 07:34 AM   #23
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
My pleasure, Callie. Just glad to help.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2005, 05:39 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
ooooh, pie crust. my nemesis. Let's just keep trying, Dina. My mom always used Crisco, but now she swears by the Pillsbury ones.
__________________

__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.