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Old 11-21-2008, 11:14 AM   #1
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Rabbi Gil Marks' Makosh

Rabbi Marks' gives lots of substitutions in his baking book and at the end I have shared the way that I make them using his recipe. Makosh are similar to other Eastern European poppyseed rolled pastry. I warn you, this pastry is highly addictive. This is another recipe that people who claim they don't like poppyseeds tend to love. I make 3 10" x 8" rolls. These are not iced. I make the poppyseed filling the night before and refrigerate it. Then, it will be ready to use after the dough is made. These poppyseed rolls were too good and not as sickly sweet as some poppyseed rolls can be. My friends and family always request these.

Rabbi Gil Marks' Makosh (Hungarian Poppyseed Roll) Based on the recipe found in "The World of Jewish Desserts: More Than 400 Recipes from Delectable Jewish Communities" (Further, I highly recommend this book)
Yield: 2 15" x 8" or 3 10" x 8" rolls,
Dairy and Tried and True

Extra-Rich Sweet Yeast Dough:
2 (1/4-ounce) packages (4-1/2 teaspoons) active dry yeast, or 2 (0.6-ounce) cakes fresh yeast
1/2 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees for dry yeast; 80 to 85 degrees for fresh yeast), or 1/4 cup warm water and 1/4 cup warm milk, or 1/2 cup water mixed with 1/4 cup nonfat dry milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup unsalted butter or margarine, softened
4 large eggs
1-1/2 teaspoon salt or 2-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
About 4-1/4 cups high-gluten flour or unbleached all-purpose flour

Egg Wash:
1 large egg yolk, beaten slightly
1 teaspoon water

Filling:
3 cups (about 1 pound) poppy seeds (ground)
1-1/2 cups water
1-1/2 cup sugar or honey; or 1 cup honey and 1/3 cup light corn syrup
2-1/2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon juice
pinch of salt

Make Yeast dough:
Proof the yeast:
Dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup of warm water (105F-110F) and stir in one teaspoon sugar. Let stand until foamy, 5 to 10 minutes.

Add the remaining water, sugar, butter, eggs, and salt. Mix in 1-1/2 cups flour. Then, mix enough of the remaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, to make a workable dough. (The amount of flour you add can change due to humidity in the flour or the room.)

Either on a lightly floured surface or in a kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook, knead the dough for about 5 minutes, adding more flour as needed to prevent sticking, until smooth and springy. Place the dough in an oiled bowl, turning to coat. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place until nearly double in size. This will take about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Or you may cover the dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate it overnight. (To test if the dough is sufficiently risen, press two fingers 1 inch deep into the center of the dough. If the indentation remain, the dough is ready) Also, you can refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour and up to 2 days.

Punch down the dough and fold over and press the dough together several times. This step redistributes the yeast and its food. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350F and line several large baking sheets with parchment paper or grease them. I prefer to use parchement paper.

Divide the dough in half or thirds. On a lightly floured surface, roll out each piece into a very thin rectangle. The thinner the dough, the thinner the cake layers. Roll out each piece into a rectangle about 1/8" thick. If you make two rolls, half of it will be rolled out to about 15"x8" and if you divide the dough in thirds, each third will be a 10"x8" rectangle. Spread lightly with the filling, leaving a 1/2-inch border along the edges. Starting from a long edge, roll up jelly roll style making sure the ends are sealed well like you would a bread dough. Place on the prepared sheet seam side down. Baking without letting the cake rise produces thin alternating layers of pastry and filling. For slightly thicker cake layers, cover and let rise for about 40 minutes. I prefer to let the rolls rise for about 40 minutes. Brush with egg wash.

Make the Poppyseed Filling:
Grind the poppyseeds or have them ground at the grocery store. I bought a wonderful poppyseed grinder at Sur La Table. Once poppyseeds are ground they have to be used right away because they can go rancid quickly and always store them in the refrigerator. Combine all the ingredients in a small saucepan and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring
frequently, until the mixture thickens, about 12 minutes. (It should be thick and may take longer). This mixture because of the sugar can burn easily so watch it like a hawk and continue stirring. Let cool. Store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

More Assembly Instructions:
Spread the filling over the dough, leaving a 1/2" border. Starting from a long end roll up jelly roll style. Be sure that you pinch and seal the seam and also the ends. I push the ends in like a bread and pinch them sealed. Place seam side down on the prepared baking sheet.

Brush with egg wash. Bake until lightly browned, about 35 minutes. Place the baking sheet on a wire rack to cool.

More of My Notes:
For the dough, I used butter and water and nonfat milk.
For the poppyseed filling, I used sugar.
I made 3 rolls and I let the rolls rise the 40 minutes.
You can dust with powdered sugar if you like.

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Old 11-21-2008, 11:18 AM   #2
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You're starting to put weight on us, young lady! Gads, another new recipe to try...over the lips and right to the hips.
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Old 11-21-2008, 11:48 AM   #3
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I told you that I love to bake. When I need to de-stress that is what I try to do and I bake more bread in the winter than the summer. This is the time of year when I make candy for Christmas presents.

If you substitute the solo brand poppyseed filling, it will work fine, I just find it sweeter and more cloying.

My dad, may he rest in peace, loved dessert and I think that is, in part, why I gravitated towards baking as a little girl. I always helped my mom and my grandma in the kitchen and I had an Hungarian babysitter, too. I have been baking all my life. I have reached the point where I can often just look at a recipe and know if it will work but I still do not consider myself an expert. There is so much that I need to learn. I am considering getting a pastry degree at the Western Reserve School of Cooking just for fun. All my friends have been encouraging me to do that for years.
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Old 12-19-2008, 11:29 PM   #4
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Susan, that recipe is very similar to the potica my grandmother and I used to make for years. I haven't made it since she went into the assisted living 2 years ago and since she passed I just don't have the "gumption" to make it this year. We also used to make nut roll which was the same basic recipe. What memories!! Thank you.

Barb
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Old 12-20-2008, 07:19 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homecook View Post
Susan, that recipe is very similar to the potica my grandmother and I used to make for years. I haven't made it since she went into the assisted living 2 years ago and since she passed I just don't have the "gumption" to make it this year. We also used to make nut roll which was the same basic recipe. What memories!! Thank you.

Barb
They can also be made with a lekvar filling. But I enjoy the nut filling the most.
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Old 12-20-2008, 09:49 AM   #6
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There is also a chocolate version called kakosh--instead of makosh.
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Old 12-20-2008, 04:16 PM   #7
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I found a little gumption--I bought a pound of fresh poppyseeds today at Penzy's. Heinen's were already ground and had become rancid--once ground they must be used right away or they go bad.

So, now all I have to do is find my poppyseed grinder, put it together, grind the seeds and make the filling.

I am one step closer to doing something. Yes, it is a babystep but I will take it!
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:03 PM   #8
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You all would appreciate this. Our local grocery stores no longer have dedicated poppyseed grinders like they did when I was little. And, once ground the little seeds become rancid very quickly.

A couple years ago, I was at Sur La Table and just for the heck of it, I looked at the sale stuff in the back. I found a Schulte poppy seed mill marked down to $6.99 from $59.95 and I knew that I had to buy it.

It is the mill that I am about to use. So, see I found some gumption after all!
Susan
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Old 12-21-2008, 01:32 PM   #9
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By the way, as I just made the filling, may I add:
If you use the sugar and water version, on medium low heat with constant stirring, it will probably take closer to half an hour. You want a paste consistency like the solo brand. The reason why I like to make this version is because it is less cloyingly sweet.

My Hungarian neighbor (may she rest in peace) even said this version was better than her sister-in-laws. I had that version and it was excellent and addictive but I thought too sweet.

Penzy's really has wonderful poppy seeds. A pound there was really not that different in cost to Heinens' but much fresher--although I did grind my own (and boy, did my arms get a workout!!!)
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Old 12-22-2008, 11:29 AM   #10
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Well, I am waiting for the first rise. I guess I found some gumption. I took a while but as I said once one gets started that is half the battle.
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