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Old 04-30-2012, 04:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I'm breaking out the snowball throwing machine right now. I've reconfigured it to launch water balloons.

I'll make it easy for you. I'll only use brightly colored virtual balloons.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
All right! A game of catch!
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:22 PM   #12
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"Also, have you ever had milk dry onto a surface? Notice that it forms a hard film, like varnish. Adding milk to your egg instead of water, to make the egg wash, might help"...

[QUOTE]I'm breaking out the snowball throwing machine right now. I've reconfigured it to launch water balloons.

I'll make it easy for you. I'll only use brightly colored virtual balloons.
All right! A game of catch!

Now we're supposed to Varnish our Pastry Crusts too.

This thread just flipped to a new page and I thought I knew what the topic was about ? I had to look back to make sure

All I wanted to do is let Sprout know I copied and pasted the recipe and am going to try it out for an occasion soon. Now, I suppose I need to make it with a Graham Cracker Crust. A Pre- Made Store Bought One At that, to ensure it is Impervious To Moisture and is Rock Solid Cement Hard!! And that will change the recipe's profile.

Now see what you guys did---

PS For further reading, here is A Brief History of Milkpaint. I don't think it's used in cooking, or in this context. I think I'll go back and just stick to the dessert now. Bye.

A brief history of milk paint
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:14 PM   #13
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Mousse of Montrachet, Lime Zest & Strawberries

Sprout,

I had prepared the Phyllo early this morning that I had in freezer. I made a Ricotta type texture mousse with strawberries minced and added Lime Zest. I put a drop of sugar in the Montrachet Goat Cheese --- to sweeten the profile a tiny bit ... ( the strawberries were put into a sieve too as well as the cheese )

Then, egg washed the sheets of the Phyllo with a brush ... and Baked !

since this flavor profile is lovely, not too sweet --- they came out lovely. I followed the rest of your recipe ---

Maybe the zest is a good choice as the juice is a possible reason, for all the wetness besides the incorrect egg wash brushing.

*** I am not expert at baking, however, I can handle a good recipe after cooking and baking all these years.


Kind regards,
Margi.
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:52 AM   #14
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This sounds fabulous
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citrus, goat cheese, pie, recipe, strawberries

Strawberry Citrus Pie I was thinking about my favorite salad at work. We call it the Cassatt. It is baby spinach with strawberries, apples, goat cheese, and candied pecans. It is served with a champagne vinaigrette, but I'm not a huge fan, so I dress it with a mix of orange, lemon, and lime juice. Then I read Andy's Key Lime Pie recipe and inspiration struck. I give you Strawberry Citrus pie with Goat Cheese Whipped Cream and Candied Pecans: Pie 1 roll phyllo dough oil or melted butter (a couple tablespoons) 2 egg whites splash lime juice powdered sugar lemon juice Juice of 2 limes juice of 3 oranges (smallish) zest of 2 oranges (smallish) 6 egg yolks 2 14oz cans sweetened condensed milk 1 lb strawberries, washed, hulled, and chopped Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix 2 egg whites with a generous splash of water and 2 teaspoons powdered sugar. Follow directions on phyllo dough package to use oil/butter to make 2 pie crusts or 24 mini shells in muffin tins. (I did one pie and 12 minis.) For last 2 layers substitute egg wash for oil. Blind bake until just golden. Can substitute ready-made shells. While shells are baking, mix orange and lime juice and add enough lemon juice to total 1 cup. (exact amounts aren't necessary). If lime and orange juice total a cup already, add a couple splashes of lemon juice and only use 1 cup of mixture. Mix 1 cup juice mixture with zest, yolks, and condensed milk. Once shells are done, divide berries between shells. You should have a nearly solid layer across the bottom of each shell. Pour the citrus-milk mixture into shells over strawberries. Bake at 350 degrees until set. Let cool to room temp, then chill in refrigerator. Goat cheese whipped cream: 1/2 pint heavy cream divided 2 oz goat cheese Powdered sugar In a small bowl, add a tablespoon of cream to goat cheese and mix until smooth. Sweeten with powdered sugar to taste. The pie is quite sweet, so sweeten conservatively. In a separate bowl, whip cream until soft peaks form, sweetening to taste with powdered sugar as you go. Again, sweeten conservatively. (Don't taste while mixer is running if you're using one, of course. Turn the power off and wait until it stops moving before you stick your finger in. Just thought I'd add to cover my butt.) When soft peaks form, add goat cheese mixture and whisk until thoroughly mixed. When pie is chilled, top with goat cheese whipped cream and candied pecans. I tried one of the minis at room temperature with the toppings and I'm in love! Now they're chilling and I can't wait to try them! My only concern is that the strawberries may ooze more liquid and mess up the consistency while it chills. It was fine at room temp, but I don't know what will happen in the fridge. I'll try to post tomorrow with an update. The recipe can be halved, of course. You would just have to eat half of 1 orange and figure out what to do with the leftover phyllo dough. :chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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