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Old 05-31-2016, 12:03 PM   #21
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Evil thread... I love pie! Cherry is about my favorite)

I make a cherry tart occasionally. It's sour cherries, sweet dark cherries, dried cherries and toasted hazel nuts. it also has a little kirsch added and definitely has a linzer torte vibe.
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Old 06-30-2016, 09:33 PM   #22
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Proper Aspic Jelly for Grosvenor Pie

Okay, Colonials: enough with this fruit pie nonsense! Us Brits invented the pie-idea and firmly believe that any pie that doesn't feature something that once went "oink" is not a pie: it's a tart, or a ... clafoutis, or a boysenberry or something.

There's perhaps only one thing better than a Melton Mowbray Pork Pie, and that is Grosvenor Pie (which I've seen on the site, but now can't find.) A long rectangular pie made with hot-water-crust pastry, veal and ham, a layer of hard-boiled eggs down the middle, and the whole thing filled with clarified aspic jelly. Here we go:



It's an all-weekend project, so might as well make two while you're at it: they would keep for about a month in the fridge, but will vanish long before that. A 1" slab of cold pie, some Coleman's mustard, a little salt, and a pint of bitter is a right-proper British pub lunch, perhaps only surpassed by two slabs, four pints, and an equally-deadbeat co-worker.

Here's a decent Grosvenor Pie recipe that's only missing three things: veal, aspic, and proper care. The aspic is key. I much prefer to cut the meat bigger so there are interstices the aspic can fill, and I also like to paint the crust interior with a couple of coats of warm aspic and allow it to set before filling the pie, rendering the crust hopefully waterproof.



If you make pastry, but have never made hot-water-crust pastry, it's basically everything you've learned never to do. Make a roux with the flour and lard, then add boiling water and knead with plastic gloves on? The result is dense, stodgy, and utterly essential to this pie.

How many people still make aspic from scratch? It's got a kinda ... Agatha Christie taint attached to it, dunnit? It's glorious, but almost extinct. Modern recipes call for ordinary stock set with gelatin: pah! The real thing uses chicken feet and pigs' trotters and smoked knuckles, and sets at room temperature without added gelatin. Here's a real recipe from Hungary that is better than mine (ears and snouts? Duh!) but would nonetheless improve with addition of some chopped chicken feet and a couple of chicken backs. Paint the assembled pie with a heavy cream/egg-yolk wash for a bright glaze, bake, and while still warm from the oven, remove from pie-tin, wrap tightly in plastic wrap in case of leaks, return to pie-tin, pour warmed aspic through the top-holes, giving the pie a shoogle and a shake from time to time to get the air-pockets out, until brim-full of aspic. Refrigerate overnight in the plastic wrap, and grab your Coleman's mustard.

A closing question: commercial versions of this pie use hard-boiled egg-tubes that have the same-width yolk running down the middle. They're made by breaking eggs into a cylindrical centrifuge and boiling until set. I've racked my brain for years to find a way to recreate that, because here I get glorious eggs from perhaps the happiest chickens in the world. Here's the standard solution, which lacks the asthetics:


.
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Old 06-30-2016, 10:20 PM   #23
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I'm not American so I make Russian cakes, which by American neither cake nor pie. But, I have to tell you Sam's club sells the absolute best apple pie ever. It's unbaked, frozen. Absolutely delicious


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Old 07-01-2016, 03:30 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
My favorite pies are savory, though. Cornish pasties are at the top of the list...



Steve, that pastie is a work of art. The ingredients shown in the cut pastie look spot-on, and cooked perfectly. Understand, I am no stranger to the pastie. My mother and uncle (her brother) once owned a bakery, and one of their specialties was pasties. In the U.P., we are famous for our pasties. So when I say that your pastie is a work of art, I know what I'm talking about. Nice job.

Oh, and another pasty tip my parents didn't know: You an take a bit of your pastry dough and form into a snake. Lay this piece of cough 2/3rds across your pre-folded pastie. Put your savory filling on one side of the snake, and desert filling on the other. When folded, the snake will create a wall between the desert and main course side. then end result is dinner and desert in one pastie. I have done this and it works beautifully.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-01-2016, 03:41 AM   #25
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Chief, that is the way the wives of miners would make theirs. They also put a handle on the end. The miner would eat everything but the handle.
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Old 07-01-2016, 09:53 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Steve, that pastie is a work of art. The ingredients shown in the cut pastie look spot-on, and cooked perfectly. Understand, I am no stranger to the pastie. My mother and uncle (her brother) once owned a bakery, and one of their specialties was pasties. In the U.P., we are famous for our pasties. So when I say that your pastie is a work of art, I know what I'm talking about. Nice job.
Thanks Chief!

Where I grew up in southwest Wisconsin, pasties are also very popular. Towns like Lead Mine and Mineral Point were centered around mining activities in the early 1800s, and most of those miners came from Cornwall originally. Of course they brought pasty recipes, too.

The recipe I use comes directly from the Cornish Pasty Association. Yes, there is such a thing. Their authentic recipe can be found here:
http://www.cornishpastyassociation.c...sty-recipe.pdf

It covers everything, right down to the proper crimping method for sealing the crust.

Unfortunately, due to dietary restrictions, I no longer eat wheat or potatoes. So it's been some time since I had a pasty myself. One of these days I'm going to have to sit down and remake my recipe to fit the new reality.
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Old 07-01-2016, 01:54 PM   #27
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Here's a pie question for you all.
We visited Minot, ND last week.

There was a pie offered at a restaurant, a "Perrette Pie", this pie had a chocolate layer on the bottom and a white layer on top of that. I have never heard of this Perrette Pie, ever.

Since returning home I googled it. There was ONE recipe for a pie made with a white cheese filling (like a cottage cheese filling). No history on this pie. No idea where it originated. Google has little to nothing on it and I've never heard of it before.

Anyone ever hear of it?
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Old 07-01-2016, 02:18 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Here's a pie question for you all.
We visited Minot, ND last week.

There was a pie offered at a restaurant, a "Perrette Pie", this pie had a chocolate layer on the bottom and a white layer on top of that. I have never heard of this Perrette Pie, ever.

Since returning home I googled it. There was ONE recipe for a pie made with a white cheese filling (like a cottage cheese filling). No history on this pie. No idea where it originated. Google has little to nothing on it and I've never heard of it before.

Anyone ever hear of it?
I looked up the Medieval History of Food. It appears that this pie is English in origin. During the days of Robin and Lady Marion. It is named after a visiting French Nobleman by the name of Perrette. He had two loves. Food and dancing.
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Old 07-01-2016, 02:21 PM   #29
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Very excellent work Addie! Any recipes for it out there?
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Old 07-01-2016, 04:10 PM   #30
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Very excellent work Addie! Any recipes for it out there?
Well, this is the only one I found. The white cheese is cottage cheese. You will have to translate the measurements. The recipe in the History Of Medieval Pies was in French and Italian. I did recognize the word ricotta though. Italian for a type of cheese similar to cottage cheese.

http://www.delicioza.com/recipe/Pie-Perrette
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