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Old 03-02-2015, 08:08 AM   #1
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What is your favourite French pastry?

Hello!
When I look at the recipes described in this website, I see a lot of French Recipe.
But for me (I'm french), it's hard to know what kind of dessert you consider as emblematic of french pastry.

So, what kind of recipes is considerated by british people like french pastry?
What ingredients are "frenchies" according to you? (rapsberry? caramel? meringue?)

Merci beaucoup !

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Old 03-02-2015, 09:00 AM   #2
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Bonjour Arnaud, ca va?
The Brits that I know here think of the exquisite little gateaux,fruit tarts and macaroons that one sees in the patisseries all over France. Also, the delicacies of each region are respected as well. For instance, here in the Bearn we have 'Russe' and 'Gateau Basque' In the north there is the wonderful apple tart with layers and layers of filo pastry. So, a wide selection I think. What do you consider typical 'British' Desserts?
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Old 03-02-2015, 09:08 AM   #3
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Fruit filled croissant.
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Old 03-02-2015, 11:40 AM   #4
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Welcome to DC Arnaud b. This is a fun place to come to. Lots of laughs and information.

We have members from all over the globe. So a lot of the recipes you see reflect what folks eat the world over.

For me, I have no idea what consists of "French" foods. We have a television show here starring Jacques Pepin. He comes from France and will often take a standard French recipe and adapt it for Americans to make. He does show French technique and it is not as hard as one would think.
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Old 03-02-2015, 12:16 PM   #5
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For me, it would be things made with pate' Choux, or beignes, especially filled. I think of croquembouche, or profiteroles, also petite fours.

Their are so many wonderful French deserts, and pastries are just a small, but delicious part.

Welcome. Sorry if anything is misspelled.

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Old 03-02-2015, 12:24 PM   #6
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For me (an American), when you say "French pastry" I usually think of fruit tarts, profiteroles, or éclairs au chocolat. I love macarons, too, although I think they are considered more of a confection than a pastry.
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Old 03-02-2015, 12:57 PM   #7
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When I think of "French Pastry" I think of little works of art served with great ceremony and or luxurious packaging.

When I was a young child my Aunt and Grandmother took me on a trip to Quebec and we stayed in the Chateau Frontenac Hotel. After we had finished dinner in a grand dining room a handsome young man came to our table pushing a silver pastry cart loaded with all sorts of elaborate little individual french pastries. My Grandmother had trouble deciding which pastry to have and the young man flirted with her and cajoled her into selecting three small pastries from the cart. My Grandmother spent the rest of the time in the restaurant extolling the virtues of the young man and then the bill came, she was incensed to think that he had charged her for three desserts that cost more than her dinner!

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Old 03-02-2015, 02:59 PM   #8
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éclairs, meringue, croissants, fruit or cream filled tarts.
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Old 03-02-2015, 03:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnaud b View Post
Hello!
When I look at the recipes described in this website, I see a lot of French Recipe.
But for me (I'm french), it's hard to know what kind of dessert you consider as emblematic of french pastry.

So, what kind of recipes is considerated by british people like french pastry?
What ingredients are "frenchies" according to you? (rapsberry? caramel? meringue?)

Merci beaucoup !
Tarte aux pommes or a really good crème caramel for me or any of those delicious little pastries for special occasions that you see in Fauchon in Paris or even the little patisseries in tiny villages in France.


Bon appetite!
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Old 03-02-2015, 06:53 PM   #10
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My first thought is croissants and baguettes. Neither are desserts per se.

Good French cheeses such as camembert, brie or Roquefort.

Yes, to eclairs, tart tatin, and crepes.

I recently learned how to make Sabayon, or in this instance, I made its Italian equivalent zabaglione. After the first time, when I nearly made scrambled eggs with the custard, I subsequently made it two times more. It is really easy once you learn the few steps and don't over cook it. Very tasty.
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