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Old 09-06-2006, 06:42 AM   #71
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sorry rdcast, i, like most people, like a nice dense cheesecake and have never tried to make a light, fluffy one. however, as an ex-chef of over 15 years experience, i can virtually assure you that if you aerate your cream cheese well and are careful not to overwhip the eggs, you should have no problems getting the light (for a cheesecake) results you want.

that said, the sour cream and ricotta will be detracting from the lightness. i also think you could ease up on the flour; most recipes do with just a few tablespoons. however, now we're talking about how i would like a cheesecake. also, we are talking about cheescake: it'll never approach the consistency of say, italian meringue. that said, i think you can safely go for it.

also, anyone who would try using baking powder in cheese is obviously open to experimentation, so...

entering the world of wild speculation, you might try coming at this from another approach. a creamcheese cake. start off with a geniose or sponge cake batter and then fold in well-beaten creamcheese that has been further aerified with some softly whipped egg whites folded in. you'd probably have to settle for a more shallow cake, but the results might be good. you'll never know unless you try!
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:03 AM   #72
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Your thoughts on sour cream and ricotta are interesting. I find any amount of aeration results in excessive collapse. Can you explain why the eggs shouldn't be whipped ?

All the best,
Robert
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Old 09-08-2006, 07:31 AM   #73
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the eggs should be whipped, but only to the soft-peak stage. if you beat them to the stiff-peak stage, the bubbles are at the limit of how much air they can hold. imagine a balloon blown up to the limit. the slightest bit more air and it will burst because the rubber can stretch no further. stiff whites are essentially similar. take those air bubbles and put them in the oven, and when the air within gets hot and expands... pop! beating your eggs to a soft peak will allow them to expand in the oven without popping.
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Old 09-08-2006, 06:19 PM   #74
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Now that's interesting tho cheesecake is unique in the weight of it's ingredients. This weight forces most bubbles to the top just under the developing dome created by airpressure. As it cools the bubbles are released from the cake allowing the dome to collapse into the characteristic crater. Unfortunately, air is air and will create this phenomena irregardless.
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