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Old 08-29-2006, 08:45 PM   #1
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Cool Baking Soda or Powder in my Cheesecake?

I'm curious about baking powder and what the heck is baking soda ?

Baking powder = Any of various powdered mixtures used in baking as a substitute for yeast

Baking soda = A white soluble compound (NaHCO3) used in effervescent drinks and in baking powders and as an antacid

What effects can I expect by adding these two ingredients to my cheesecakes ???

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Old 08-29-2006, 09:52 PM   #2
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Both are leavening agents in baking. The soda is about four times as strong as the powder.

I don't use either in cheesecake, the beating of the cream cheese butter, sugar and eggs provides the lift.

Adding chemical leaveners would cause the cheese cake to rise even more. I'm not sure if the rise would hold or collapse upon cooling.

Are you thinking of adding leaveners because you're having a problem?
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Old 08-29-2006, 10:09 PM   #3
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It would depend upon what the ingredients of the cheese cake. Baking soda must be combined with some acidic ingredient in order to activate it into creating the bubbles which make the recipe rise. The acid can be buttermilk, cream of tartar, lemon juice, milk or some other acid. Baking soda begins to react or bubble as soon as the liquid ingredients are added.

Baking powder is actually baking soda with an acid (in powdered form) and usually some sort of filler already mixed together. Baking powder can be labeled "Single Acting" or "Double Acting". Single acting baking powder, like baking soda and acidic liquid will begin to react as soon as liquid is added. Double acting baking powder has two reactions. The first occurs when the liquid is added to the recipe and the second reaction starts when the mixture is heated.

Does your recipe for cheese cake have an acidic ingredient already? Baking soda is much more reactive than baking powder and so you do not add as much baking soda as baking powder.
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Old 08-29-2006, 10:26 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Are you thinking of adding leaveners because you're having a problem?
No, actually I'm having a great deal of success but would chance the effect if it meant a lighter product. The notion that it could aggravate the falling phenomenon is something to consider, thanks
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Old 08-29-2006, 10:28 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurora
Does your recipe for cheese cake have an acidic ingredient already? Baking soda is much more reactive than baking powder and so you do not add as much baking soda as baking powder.
I use a 1/4 cup of lemon juice. Does baking powder need the acid as well and which tastes better ?
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Old 08-29-2006, 10:31 PM   #6
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As aurora said, powder provides its own acid, so you don't any from the recipe to help it.
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:33 PM   #7
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I sure wouldn't add baking powder or soda to a recipe where it isn't called for, with just a few exceptions, this not being one.
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:41 PM   #8
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Are you not happy with your cheesecake recipe, or just interested in experimenting? I can't imagine any logical reason FOR adding either baking soda or baking powder to cheesecake.
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:42 PM   #9
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oh, well it's my recipe and I arrived at it by tinkering around and asking questions before formulating my own opinion and finally testing it. I'm adding 1 Tsp of baking soda to the cheesecake I'm mixing right now. I'll post its outcome. "Nothing ventured, nothing gained" unless someone can categorically and authoritatively say it will have a negative impact(which no one has so far) then on we go !!!!!!!!

Wish me luck
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Old 08-30-2006, 04:24 PM   #10
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I don't think I've seen a recipe for cheesecake with a chemical leavener in it. For a reason, I am sure.
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