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Old 07-20-2012, 09:08 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by s_mack View Post
Thought I'd ask before trying.

Cake recipe calls for 1 cup whole milk. A lot of the comments complain its too dry. Several suggest adding "extra milk" and 1/4 cup sour cream.
How about just trying a recipe without such negative comment? I'm sure there are plenty of cake recipes to choose from...
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:08 PM   #12
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sure, why not?
The severe stomach ache, for one :)
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:20 PM   #13
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The severe stomach ache, for one :)
Well...I should know better about assuming...but since this is a cooking forum and not a Formula-1 forum...I was thinking a vegetable oil of some sort...maybe coco-NUT!
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:29 PM   #14
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The severe stomach ache, for one :)
I think you should read "Ratio" not "Radio" and perhaps should not use 5W40 for cooking.

So let's get serious. Did you try the recipe or did you decide to change it?

I recall that more cooking oil is sometimes used to make breads and cakes more moist. But not 5w40.
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:56 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by s_mack View Post
FYI - I did the math (just in case anyone else every needs a cup of whole milk and only had 18% an 1% lol)

2 tablespoons of 18% cream and 14 tablespoons of 1% milk is very close to 1c of 3.25% "whole" milk

If you have 2% milk... its 4 tablespoons of cream and 44 teaspoons of 2%

But that's being pretty exact :) I doubt anyone wants to count out 44 teaspoons! lol. So probably just take a cup of 2% and minus 1.5tbs, then add in 1.5tbs of cream and that's going to be close enough ;)
The 2% and 18% is easy. Put 2 tablespoons of 18% cream in a cup measure and then fill it to 1 cup. Don't bother measuring out the 14 tablespoons. 1 cup = 16 tablespoons ( 2 tblsps + 14 tblsps = 16 tblsps, 1 cup).
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:56 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
How about just trying a recipe without such negative comment? I'm sure there are plenty of cake recipes to choose from...
Literally millions, I'm sure :) But I wanted to try that one. And it gets absolutely glowing reviews on flavor... just a lot of comments that its "too dry". Adding liquid is the answer, I was just looking for suggestions on what to do. I got some, thanks.

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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
So let's get serious. Did you try the recipe or did you decide to change it?
I changed it. I haven't baked it yet though. I'm waiting for the "milk" to come down to room temp.

By "milk"... I ended up using:
  • 1/2c less 1 Tbsp of 1% milk
  • 1 Tbsp of 18% cream
  • 1/2c 14% sour cream (what the heck)
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:59 PM   #17
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I was thinking a vegetable oil of some sort...maybe coco-NUT!
:) Probably a great way to go. And if making it creamier doesn't do the trick, I'll try oil next time. I try to avoid oils and shortening if I can - My wife generally don't like the taste. I admit I've never tried coconut oil in baking though. I'll pick some up next time I see some.

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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
The 2% and 18% is easy. Put 2 tablespoons of 18% cream in a cup measure and then fill it to 1 cup. Don't bother measuring out the 14 tablespoons. 1 cup = 16 tablespoons ( 2 tblsps + 14 tblsps = 16 tblsps, 1 cup).
Brilliant! I tend to over-think things. You're spot on, of course. I just didn't see it that way!
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:12 PM   #18
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Literally millions, I'm sure :) But I wanted to try that one. And it gets absolutely glowing reviews on flavor... just a lot of comments that its "too dry". Adding liquid is the answer, I was just looking for suggestions on what to do. I got some, thanks.


I changed it. I haven't baked it yet though. I'm waiting for the "milk" to come down to room temp.

By "milk"... I ended up using:
  • 1/2c less 1 Tbsp of 1% milk
  • 1 Tbsp of 18% cream
  • 1/2c 14% sour cream (what the heck)
I want you to have a good cooking experience or I wouldn't have posted in your topic. Please post your good results including your final formula you utilized, particularly if your recipe exceeded your expectations.

Nothing better than a good recipe!
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Old 07-20-2012, 11:29 PM   #19
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I'll be sure to post the results... good or bad :)

I was going to make it tomorrow (the party is tomorrow night), but I'm going to make it in a few hours just in case it doesn't work out so I have time to try again. If its a disaster, I'll try it with some simple canola oil and if that doesn't work... attempt #3 will be exactly as per recipe, and we'll just see how dry is "dry" :)

Last ditch: head to Wal-mart to pick up some Duncan Heinz mix.
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:45 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by s_mack View Post
Well... first off, 100% would be... well, lard I guess?

I think you misunderstand fat content.

"whole" milk is 3.25% milk fat by volume. What I have is 1% and 18%. The sour cream is actually a relatively high fat content at 14% ("light", by comparison, is typically around 5%). Yogurt wasn't mentioned.

So with the science of it, I could do the math and combine appropriate amounts of 18% and 1% to get pretty close to a 3.25% yield... but that wasn't really the question.

As I mentioned, comments were that the recipe was too dry. As I'm sure YOU know :)... baking is just as much an art as it is a science. The classic time-tested 1-2-3-4 cake recipe has endured for (hundreds of?) years... are we really to believe that it actually happens that this radio is scientifically derived? No, its more a matter of round numbers, convenience, and easy to remember. Every recipe can be tweaked. This one, according to others, is too dry so people add "more milk" (which is vague) and 1/4 cup fo sour cream (no mention of fat content). So my question, really, was for opinions and feelings on what I might try with the 18%/1% mixture as 1) a substitute for 3.25% and b) to accomodate the "dry" aspect.

I have to run to the store now anyway... not enough butter... but I'm still hesitant to buy whole milk for this unless there's a good reason :)

Baking to me is not a science, but an art born of knowing how the ingredients work together to make whatever it is that I want to make. I regularly throw together batters for this or that, and sometimes make substitutions if I don't have the ingredients I want.

If the complaint is "dry cake", then adding more fat will definitely solve the problem. For instance, a boxed cake mix recipe that states the addition of 1/3 cup of cooking oil, is much more moist, and satisfying with the addition of 2 extra tbs. of cooking oil. So in your recipe, using cream to increase the fat content would work. And junlike cooking oil, I don't think you will ruin your cake if you add a bit more cream than you actually need.

I once obtained a carrot cake recipe that called for a lot of cooking oil. Looking at the recipe, I thought that the amount may have been a misprint. But after speaking with the person who gave it to me, I tried it. The cake tasted like it was supposed to, and the crumb was good, but it was so heavy with cooking oil that I could press down on my slice, and oil would ooze out, like from a sponge. I reduced the oil amount by half and the cake was then very good.

Fat is what gives a cake, or most quickbreads that moist texture we all love. So in response to your question, I would substitue 1/2 of the whole milk with your cream. So take your skim milk, and add enough cream to approximate whole milk, and add half the amount the recipe calls for of that mixture to the cake batter. Add the rest as straight cream.

Another way to increase the moisture of your cake is to poke holes into the baked cake with a fork. Then mix up either a complimentary gelatine flavor (cherry with chocolate, or butterscotch with a yellow cake, etc), or an instant pudding mix that compliments the cake. Then pour the gelatine, or pudding over the cake, then place in the fridge for two hours before serving. This is an excellent technique for making your cake extra moist and flavorfull.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the NOrth
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