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Old 12-15-2006, 03:20 AM   #11
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I don't think there is enough butter in this recipe to come close to making anything like a pound cake and that's a lot of milk. You need to find a new recipe. If you're trying to make a pound cake for sure, look for a million dollar pound cake recipe. It takes a little longer to bake but is worth every minute.
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Old 12-15-2006, 06:18 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lsutiger
Well, I was able to obtain the type of denseness I was looking for with this recipe. After sitting out for awhile it tasted a bit dry; I was wondering if anyone wanted to take a look at that recipe and maybe give me some advice or point me in the direction of a cake of similar denseness that might retain some more moisture. Again, thanks for all the help, this site is so awesome.
This is pretty close (in ratios of ingredients) to several pound cake recipes I have from many years. If it is dry, it is perhaps a bit overbaked. Try a little less time in the oven. That is the most common "problem" with pound cakes, in my opinion.
If you double this recipe it will bake nicely in a bundt cake pan--that is what my recipes use (and why this recipe is similar, if doubled). If I want loaves, I bake in two loaf pans. Watch and test for doneness though. There should be a bit of crumb sticking to your tester--not "clean". And the edges should just be pulling back from the edge of the pan. The center of the cake (if there is a "break") may look a little "wet/moist".
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Old 12-15-2006, 09:10 AM   #13
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i don't have my pound cake recipe at hand, but i don't think i need it.

1 lb butter
1 lb sugar
1 lb eggs
1 lb flour
a hefty pinch of salt
a good glug of vanilla

you can go about putting this together a number of different ways, but essentially they all involve beating as much air into the eggs as possible, as there is no other leavening involved. the salt and the vanilla can actually go into the recipe at various point and places.

one method: combine the eggs and sugar in a large copper or stainless steel bowl. place over gently boiling water and, keeping the eggs moving so they don't turn into scrambled eggs, beat until the color turns to a creamy light yellow, the volume has increased 3- or 4-fold, and if you take a wooden spoon or rubber spatula out of it, it comes off not like water from the tap, but in sheets or ribbons. take it off the heat and beat another minute or so, so it won't continue to cook from the heat of the bowl. let cool enough so that it won't melt the butter when added.
beat the butter until it's as fluffy as it's going to get and add the vanilla.
sift the flour with the salt 2 or 3 times.
gently fold in about 1/3 of the egg mixture into the butter, then sift in about 1/3 of the flour. continue alternating folding in 1/3rds.

another method: cream the butter and sugar well, with the vanilla. add only the yolks, 1 at a time while beating, until it's as fluffy as possible. beat the whites to a soft peak. then fold in 1/3 of the meringue, then 1/3 of the sifted flour, etc. as above.

fold the ingredients to make the batter, but don't beat the batter itself, if you follow me you can also fold in dried fruits,as much or as little as you like, for a fruit cake.

this cake is rich, has a good crumb, and makes a great fruit cake. you'd have a lot of trouble making this one come out dry. it will make 2 loaves, and should probably be baked at about 350 f for around an hour, but as i said, i don't have my recipe at hand. use your eyes and do the toothpick test.
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Old 03-07-2007, 05:32 PM   #14
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I too have encountered the problem in which my cake had the texture of cornbread. It was as if it had risen but was still quite compact. I did not use cake flour only all purpose. Additionally, I was actually making cupcakes and in order to reduce the servings by half I simply cut all ingredients by 1/2. This left me one problem...how to divide 3 eggs by two. I came very near to literally using one and one half eggs but went with 2 instead.

Does anyone suspect the absence of cake flour or the addition of 1/2 egg to be a problem. I just want the scratch recipe to look and taste like a box of cake mix would look after being baked (density, moistness, etc.)

Also...pound cake isn't quite the same as regular cake is it???

Please help.
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Old 03-13-2007, 09:20 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oversteve
I too have encountered the problem in which my cake had the texture of cornbread. It was as if it had risen but was still quite compact. I did not use cake flour only all purpose. Additionally, I was actually making cupcakes and in order to reduce the servings by half I simply cut all ingredients by 1/2. This left me one problem...how to divide 3 eggs by two. I came very near to literally using one and one half eggs but went with 2 instead.

Does anyone suspect the absence of cake flour or the addition of 1/2 egg to be a problem. I just want the scratch recipe to look and taste like a box of cake mix would look after being baked (density, moistness, etc.)

Also...pound cake isn't quite the same as regular cake is it???

Please help.
especially for pound cake, you should be fine using ap flour. you can get away with using ap flour for just about any cake, though the crumb won't be as fine as with cake flour. you can also substitute a small amount of corn starch for part of the regular flour. however, unless you're making a nice sponge cake or chiffon cake, etc., i wouldn't worry about the flour at all.

a little more or a little less egg? less will make the cake more crumbly and perhaps a little more dry (you could add another tablespoon of butter to make it more moist). a little more egg will make the cake hold together better, add some moisture, and make it chewier.

and yes, pound cake is different from "regular" cake, though it depends on what kind of "regular" cake you're talking about. it would take at least a page or so to cover that though, so unless you're really interested, i'll pass on that topic for now.
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