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Old 05-16-2012, 11:06 AM   #1
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Cake ingredients substitutions

If vinegar is called for in a cake does the type of vinegar (if it's only a teaspoon or tablespoon) matter. For example balsamic or apple cider vinegar for white (I'm thinking you can Not swap out right?) I feel like I should know this but if I did, I forgot. I have subbed out vegetable oil with a blend of olive oil & butter with excellent results before. I can't remember about the vinegar though.

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Old 05-16-2012, 11:07 AM   #2
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I might try cider vin but certainly not balsamic. The flavor is to strong.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:22 AM   #3
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I personally only use white vinegar in baking.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:40 AM   #4
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Yeah, I think I had better stick with white vinegar. Oh well. Guess I will be getting dressed today after all.
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Old 05-20-2012, 04:34 AM   #5
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Balsamic is beautiful in Chocolate cakes!
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:28 AM   #6
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I use either apple cider or regular white vinegar in baking, both work well. Usually the amount is small enough that the extra flavor of cider doesn't make a difference.

Those are really the only two that I use interchangeably in baking, although I used pickle juice in a chocolate cake out of desperation, lol!
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:15 AM   #7
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I only use white vinegar for cleaning. The alcohol that the vinegar is made from can be a petroleum product. I always use cider vinegar and have never had a problem. If I were out of cider vinegar, I would sub white wine vinegar or even rice vinegar. If it's for something chocolate, I wouldn't hesitate to use red wine vinegar and may try balsamic some time.

It's for the chemical reaction. I would check the percentage of vinegar to make sure it is a similar strength to white vinegar, which is usually 5% acetic acid.
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I only use white vinegar for cleaning. The alcohol that the vinegar is made from can be a petroleum product. I always use cider vinegar and have never had a problem. If I were out of cider vinegar, I would sub white wine vinegar or even rice vinegar. If it's for something chocolate, I wouldn't hesitate to use red wine vinegar and may try balsamic some time.

It's for the chemical reaction. I would check the percentage of vinegar to make sure it is a similar strength to white vinegar, which is usually 5% acetic acid.

There are no petroleum products used to make white vinegar. White vinegar is a distillation of other vinegar such as malt vinegar. Vinegars are created from the fermentation of food products - malt, wine, cider, etc.. White or distilled vinegar is made by distilling one of these food based vinegars.

No petroleum products are involved in the process.
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
There are no petroleum products used to make white vinegar. White vinegar is a distillation of other vinegar such as malt vinegar. Vinegars are created from the fermentation of food products - malt, wine, cider, etc.. White or distilled vinegar is made by distilling one of these food based vinegars.

No petroleum products are involved in the process.
This is what Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Division, Internal Revenue Service has to say about it:

"Presently, we authorize the manufacture of vinegar from ethyl alcohol synthesized from natural gas or petroleum derivatives. It is our opinion that most of the distilled spirits used in the production of vinegar are derived from natural gas and petroleum. When such alcohol is used in the production of vinegar, we would consider any reference to 'grain alcohol' or 'neutral grain spirits' would be misleading for the alcohol and also the name 'grain vinegar' would be misleading, except for connoting strength, e.g., 40-grains."

From the FDA web page at: CPG Sec. 555.100 Alcohol; Use of Synthetic Alcohol in Foods

I don't just make up this stuff.
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:47 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
This is what Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Division, Internal Revenue Service has to say about it:

"Presently, we authorize the manufacture of vinegar from ethyl alcohol synthesized from natural gas or petroleum derivatives. It is our opinion that most of the distilled spirits used in the production of vinegar are derived from natural gas and petroleum. When such alcohol is used in the production of vinegar, we would consider any reference to 'grain alcohol' or 'neutral grain spirits' would be misleading for the alcohol and also the name 'grain vinegar' would be misleading, except for connoting strength, e.g., 40-grains."

From the FDA web page at: CPG Sec. 555.100 Alcohol; Use of Synthetic Alcohol in Foods

I don't just make up this stuff.
I guess I live in an idealistic world.

I did see this in your linked article: Practically and scientifically, pure ethyl alcohol synthesized from natural gas or petroleum products does not differ from that obtained by fermentation with subsequent distillation. Furthermore, foods in which one is used cannot be distinguished objectively from those in which the other is used.
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