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Old 04-08-2006, 11:57 PM   #1
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Cake Mix substitute

So many cake recipes start by using a cake mix.
Is there any tried and true way to sub this with a scratch formula? The cake mixes I have always used are the "add water only" kind. I thought about subbing with the dry ingredients of a "white cake" recipe....but I don't think that would work because of whatever "additional" things they add to a cake mix to make it rise. I'd appreciate any thoughts on this!

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Old 04-09-2006, 01:47 AM   #2
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I would think there is a way to do what you are asking, but I've never used a cake mix that was adding water only.
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Old 04-09-2006, 01:59 AM   #3
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I hope this isn't just a "restaurant" thing. Ours come in 5 pound bags..and all we add is 5 cups water. Thank you for the comment! Maybe someone else who "gets" (hehehe) to shop at grocers will know. My food truck is what I'm used to.
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Old 04-09-2006, 08:05 AM   #4
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Just look up a recipe for yellow cake, chocolate cake and make it from scratch.
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Old 04-09-2006, 11:19 AM   #5
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perhaps this will be helpful--it comes from a book on making yuour own mixes

Basic Cake Mix

8 cups cake flour
6 cups sugar
1/4 cup baking powder
1 1/2 tsp. salt
2 1/2 C vegetable shortening

In a large bowl sift the dry ingredients together. Mix well. Cut in shortening until evenly distributed. Store in an airtight container for 10-12 weeks. Makes about 16 cups. Looking at the recipes in the book that use this mix 3 1/3 cups is equal to a box of cake mix. The recipe for chocolate cake calls for 9 TBL cocoa. Hope this helps.
ETA: most of the recipes call for 2 eggs
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Old 04-09-2006, 11:47 AM   #6
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If you ever get a chance to look at the cookbook, King Arthur Flours 200th Anniversary cookbook, they give many recipes for cakes from scratch.

There really is no reason to make a cake from a mix, it is so easy, quick, and you control the ingredients, not to mention the cost. But I do not think the King Arthur book deals in quantity cooking. For larger cakes, FOOD FOR FIFTY is the cookbook to get.
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Old 04-09-2006, 12:13 PM   #7
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I'm sorry...but I haven't been making myself clear. The recipes I'm talking use the cake mix in a "dry" state. I'm wondering what makes the "dry" mix when it is an "add water only" cake mix. I have read the "ingredients" on the
package...but there are so many "unknown" things to me...I don't know how to duplicate. It even states there is egg in it....but I don't know how much of what. Any other ideas? I'm needing to duplicate a "dry mix" that you only add water to. Thanks!
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Old 04-09-2006, 12:19 PM   #8
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Another forum mentioned there is "dried egg whites" and "dried vanilla". (Shame on me...I didn't even know that.) So...I'm getting closer. Now all I have to do is figure out the "shortening" part. Any help friends? Thanks in advance!
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Old 04-09-2006, 02:04 PM   #9
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It sounds like the above posted recipe for basic cake mix would work. Just add 2 dried eggs and cut in the shortening.
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Old 04-09-2006, 10:09 PM   #10
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Well - just for grins ... the first cake mixes like Betty Crocker back in about 1950 were "just add water" - and they didn't sell very well because housewives didn't trust them (they were too simple). So, they left out the powdered eggs and made the instructions "add an egg and water" and sales went up!

Sure - it is possible to create your own dry mix. You'll just have to work out the formula based on a standard recipe and on the ingredients you have access to - substituting dry for normally wet ingredients (like vanilla, eggs and milk) and then adjusting the water. It's just a matter of a little "reverse engineering". But, there might be one big hitch to the "just add water" formula ... the fat.

Even without you posting the name of the mix you are using, or the ingredients, I'm going to guess one listed is "partially hydrogenated soybean and/or cotton seed oil". And, that is going to be your problem - finding powdered freeze dried oil. I've looked and couldn't find it - well I might have but the smallest quantity listed was a train tanker car - and it wasn't from a company in the US.

Find a recipe you like - sub in available dry "wet" ingredients (vanilla, eggs, milk), work out the formulas and add the oil and water.

Of course - you also need to figure out if mixing your own is really cheaper than the "just add water" mix.
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