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Old 06-18-2006, 11:50 AM   #11
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Sounds like a good idea if you've not had that much experience. Why don't you try first to
-make a 'traditional cheesecake'
-make a quiche with cheddar cheese so you can see how cheddar melts and reacts to baking
-make a savory, appetizer cheesecake, to get an idea of some savory flavors that can be used.
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Old 06-18-2006, 12:23 PM   #12
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Personally, I love anything with cheese in it, and for the best flavor, I use the best cheese, Tillamook. Sorry Goodweed of the North, but there just isn't a better cheese. All kidding aside, I'm hoping Banana Brain goes ahead with the plan. I'd love to hear how it turns out, and how it tastes. Is Velvetta even a cheese?

For a cheesey treat, try the Pillsbury Cheddar Grands, and gosh, made with real Tillamook Cheddar Cheese.
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Old 06-18-2006, 10:54 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Bankston
Personally, I love anything with cheese in it, and for the best flavor, I use the best cheese, Tillamook. Sorry Goodweed of the North, but there just isn't a better cheese. All kidding aside, I'm hoping Banana Brain goes ahead with the plan. I'd love to hear how it turns out, and how it tastes. Is Velvetta even a cheese?

For a cheesey treat, try the Pillsbury Cheddar Grands, and gosh, made with real Tillamook Cheddar Cheese.
If you ever get the chance to try Balderson Heritage Cheddar, aged 5 years, you will understand what I mean. Now I'm not saying that Tillamook is bad cheese, because it's pretty good stuff. But for my tastebuds, Balderson, and the aged cheddar from a small cheesemaker in Wisconsin, are the best I've personally tasted. (Balderson has taken number 1 in Canada for several years as the finest cheddar made in Canada. And I'm not one who is territorial. I've had good Vermont cheese, and I'm sure there are extraordinary cheddars with unique flavors (heard of one where the cheddar is covered in sweet hay to pick up some of the hay flavor as it ages, supposedly raising it above the competition), but my experience is limited by the selection available to me where I live. I can get both Balderson and Tillamook here, and can make the comparison. And largely, the best, is relative to the personal tastes of the taster.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-19-2006, 01:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Sounds like a good idea if you've not had that much experience. Why don't you try first to
-make a 'traditional cheesecake'
-make a quiche with cheddar cheese so you can see how cheddar melts and reacts to baking
-make a savory, appetizer cheesecake, to get an idea of some savory flavors that can be used.
Good idea. I HAVE made quiches with cheddar cheese before. I agree I need to make a traditional cheesecake (I think I'm going to try making a New York as soon as I get back from vacation) and a savory cheesecake. I wonder what a savory cheesecake tastes like.
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Old 06-19-2006, 05:26 AM   #15
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I started a topic in 'Dairy' for you, and listed one of my savory cheesecakes:

Savory Cheesecakes
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Old 06-19-2006, 12:17 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Banana Brain
So I was watching The Secret Life of Cheesecake today, as I amb addicted to the Food Network, and I was watching all about the different types of cheesecake from all around the world. Outside of the US, every country pretty much has its own kind of cheesecake besides cream cheese. The French use their Neufchâtel, the Romans like Ricotta, the Greeks use Mascarpone, etceterra. And I had to wonder: why doesn't anyone use the best cheese in the world, sharp cheddar cheese? Or white cheddar? So I'm going to create a dessert cheesecake made of fine Tillamook cheddar or white cheddar cheeses. Or maybe something cheaper, because I havn't actually ever made a cheesecake and might screw it up. I'm determined to do this, and I'll try and keep you posted. Wish me luch and that it doesn't end up tasting like I spilled my candy and soda in my nacho cheese at the movies.
Give it a try BB.

Did a little research and found, YES you can use cheddar for a dessert cheesecake - not just as a savory appetizer. If you were seeking an appy (savory) cheesecake, my choice is a smoked salmon cheesecake. I've also made a ricottta/souffle like cheesecake with strawberries and Amaretto. But, back to the cheddar dessert cheesecake... here are a few I found & one includes Tillamook, that might give you some ideas to create your own.

http://www.tillamookcheese.com/Recip...heesecake.aspx

If you do a search on Cheddar Cheesecake, there are lots of ideas for inspiration. Let us know what you come up with.
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Old 06-22-2006, 04:26 PM   #17
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Here's an idea for a great tart. I haven't tried it but think it would be very good.

Combine 4 pkgs. cream cheese with 1/4 lb. of real of fake shredded crab. Mix in 1/4 cup clam juice and 3 eggs. Beat until creamy. blend in 1/2 cup heavy cream to the mixture.

Press Phylo dough into greased muffin tins and fill with the cheese/crab mixture. Bake for about 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

This is just off the top of my head so you might need to adjust the timing and/or temperature.

You could also substitute salmon or trout meat for the crab.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-30-2006, 10:23 AM   #18
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I have been reading this thread with interest...and from where I am sitting at my family's home in the West Country I can see the Cheddar Gorge!

They are very snooty about cheddar cheese here, and feel like Champagne it should have protected name status. We have literally hundreds of variations of the stuff, let alone the ones when you add stuff to the cheese. Sometimes at local dinner parties the cheese plate consists just of different types of cheddar, which is a bit much for me, especially when there are loads of other good local cheeses. I'll keep my ear to the ground for some cheddar cheese cake recipes, but if I do find any, I doubt I'll be doing test run for you...! LOL
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Old 06-30-2006, 12:01 PM   #19
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Savory "cheesecake"--quiche? I make a smoked salmon cheesecake that has some Swiss cheese in it--not a lot.
Apple pie and cheddar cheese--very old classic "go together".
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Old 07-15-2006, 09:18 PM   #20
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Ive heard of using cheddar and always wanted to do one myself and the thought of using white cheddar is a nice touch. How would you get it soft tho'? Just me being dumb again. I know! how about cheddar CHEEZ WHIZ, haha
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