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Old 07-19-2005, 06:48 AM   #21
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Tx, Michael - unfortunately I dont' have the time or money to do a lot of experimenting; they want their cheesecakes NOW, lol!


Read one of Nick Malgiere's treatises on cheesecake, and he's very adamant about not beating it too much; gives pretty specific '30 second' times for each step.
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Old 07-25-2005, 11:34 PM   #22
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I will try to find Nick's thoughts online ... I can't afford to buy everyone's cookbooks!

I know I've seen him on a show with Sara Molton, Gail Gand, or Martha "M-Diddy" Stewart. I probably only remember him because you mentioned his "30-second" mixing. I remember when I saw it I kind of blew it off like I did Alton Brown's cheesecake recipe - kind of hard to change techniques when you have a recipe that comes out the way you want it.

But - I will revisit his views ... and may come up with a recipe I like even better.
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Old 08-02-2005, 09:15 PM   #23
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Update!

Well, I baked the cheesecakes at 325 instead of 350, in a water bath, and used a recipe w/out the sour cream - and - drum roll - they look gorgeous! Sorry to say, I don't know what it was that did the trick, but it worked!

Now I have to throw together some toppings for them!

Thanks for everyone's help!
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Old 01-13-2007, 09:58 PM   #24
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I found this thread from the old files.

There is some good disscussion on here, So I am going to keep it going.

There is alot of talk about water baths.

Does anyone cook their cheesecake with a pan of water on the rack below it? (instead of directly in it)
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Old 01-15-2007, 03:11 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine
It's all about the texture
Eating cheesecake is a very sensual experience; texture is everything. Some recipes contain a small amount of starch, such as flour or cornstarch. These recipes will result in a cheesecake whose texture is slightly more firm and cakelike. These flour-containing cheesecakes can be baked directly on the oven rack at moderate temperatures. Cheesecake recipes that do not contain flour are intended to be delightfully smooth and silky. To achieve the proper texture, these cheesecakes must be baked in a water bath at a lower temperature.
My question is.... Can I simply add some flour to a recipe that does not already include it (to achive that "firmer texture")?
Or do I also need to alter other ingredients?

Thanks.....To any of you that take the time to help me with this issue
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Old 01-15-2007, 03:19 PM   #26
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Usually the adition of flour is made because you are trying to prevent cracks in the cheesecake...now I have actually added some flour to my cheesecakes before to achieve texture so I know what you are talking about. I would say "Yes" you can just add flour to your cheesecake recipe as is. just don't add a ton...

And still bake it in a water bath when you bake it...the flour will be minimal and you are basically baking a custard so bake it in a water bath...you will be glad you did...

Have a good one,
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Old 01-15-2007, 03:49 PM   #27
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Thank you Robert.

I am thinking, about 2 tbls. (on a recipe with about 3-4 packs cream cheese)
Sound about right?
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Old 01-15-2007, 03:59 PM   #28
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Hey Robert,
I just signed up on your site (I am waiting for activation)

Hope ya wont mind me asking cheesecake questions on your forum also...LOL
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Old 01-15-2007, 05:13 PM   #29
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[quote=Andy M.]Michael:

Your recipe is similar to mine. I use larger quantities to fill a 10" springform to the top. Also, the higher temp I use gives me a browned top without resorting to the broiler...quote]

And you rrecipe is exactly the same as mine except that I use 3 tbs. cornstarch instead of the flour, and I use 4 extra large eggs.

Start at 425 for 15 minutes, turn down to 200, and bake for 45 mintuers more. Then test by jiggling the pan. IF it looks like jello rather than batter, then I turn off the heat, crack the oven door, and let it cool with the oven. The finished product is very creamy and smooth. If I let it cook until firm in the oven, then I get a very dense and firm cheescake, but not so creamy. I like it both ways and will use one or the other depending on the topping to be placed on it.

If I'm putting something like a fruit pie filling, then I make it more firm. If I'm going to top it with sweetened sour cream, or whipped cream, or a mousse, then I make it more creamy.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-15-2007, 05:33 PM   #30
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I use cornstarch and flour in my recipe...I'm glad goodweed mentioned that...you can try either but both do the same thing...corn starch just builds the texture more with less.

I use probably 3-4 tables spoons total...half flour half corn starch...You are on the right track...start messing around with it and see how you like it...

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