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Old 09-05-2006, 01:45 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
I think jen might be onto something...
Do reinvent just yet, Go with TNT recipies, that will give you a basic understanding of the components and outcome, then double the recipie if you want the towering cake of goodness. Once you feel comfortable, then experiment.
There's wisdom in what you say. I believe that you must first master what your teacher brings to you, and only then go beyond it. I'm preparing to help in a fund-raiser with mah Drunken Cheesecakes. I need them to be better than they've ever known. Not just the usual but something they will point to and say, "this is the best cheesecake I've ever had". Is this too much to hope for ?
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Old 09-05-2006, 02:21 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by vagriller
Does anyone know where to find 8" toothpicks?
83/4in wooden skewers
wooden toothpicks & skewers
wooden skewers2
wooden skewers3
bamboo skewers
bamboo skewers2
bamboo skewers3
more
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Old 09-05-2006, 02:33 PM   #23
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I need them to be better than they've ever known. Not just the usual but something they will point to and say, "this is the best cheesecake I've ever had". Is this too much to hope for ?
I don't think it's too much to hope for, but I don't think a cheesecake gets better by increasing in height. It certainly is unique though! I would get the taste and texture down perfect first. Also I have found that it's a gradual progression to get a perfect cheesecake. For instance, four years ago I thought it was perfect, but my current cheesecake blows that one away.
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Old 09-05-2006, 02:35 PM   #24
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Evolution is also a part of creation. There is nothing wrong with aspiring to have the best, I often say good enough is not good enough. Just start off 1 step at a time, Rome wasn't built in a day.
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Old 09-05-2006, 03:06 PM   #25
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Just start off 1 step at a time, Rome wasn't built in a day.
Word to ya motha...
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Old 09-05-2006, 03:12 PM   #26
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Eureka! I've got it! You need to make two cheesecakes and stack 'em. Let me explain. I tried and experiment last year that produced a wonderful cheesecake filling but was altogether a flop. I made my usual cheesecaked filling in my 10-inch sprinform pan. But it was crustless. I did it by lining the pan, both bottom and sides, with lightly greased parchment paper. As the custard cooked, do to the protiens in the batter, it shrunk inward just slightly. I had pre-baked a graham cracker crust in the same pan and gently removed it before hand. When I removed the custard, it fit perfectly into the pre-made crust. What ruined my recipe is that I half filled the crust with a ganache and chilled it. I then placed the custard on top. I expected it to be perfect. The problem was that when the cheesecake was cut into, the ganache was properly liquified and ran all over the place. But the technique is still sound. Build you crust first and pre-bake it. Then bake the two cheesecakes in your two different sized, parchment-paper-lined pans. Then, when the filling is cooked through and cooled completely, stack them into the crust. You will have your enormously tall cheesecake. It should be spectacular. But make sure the recipe you use provides sufficient body for you to handle the crustless filling. If you want, I can post my recipe.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North (And the Goodweed has nothing to do with illegal substances. I was the kid that never grew like a bad weed, hence my pseaudonym).
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Old 09-05-2006, 03:20 PM   #27
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Old 09-05-2006, 04:22 PM   #28
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there's a weed in California that smells like sage and kerosene. Mom n Dad would take us to a beautiful river to salmon fish using salmon eggs which also smelled delicious. But that weed is truly the good weed.

The process you explained Goodweed is of itself something that should be patented. I'm afraid tho, it's commercial use would be hard to imagine due to the added number of steps. Beyond this, I would think the top of the bottom layer would have to be cut off to make a flat platform representing a sizable lose of product. I also like the continuum of texture from top to bottom. The actual purpose for tall cheesecakes is its superior presentation. Three inch tall cakes just doesn't cut it for me. The taller the cake the larger the eyes.
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Old 09-05-2006, 04:32 PM   #29
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yet evolution should never replace creation. Some things can only be achieved by a leap of faith. I have tinkered with experimenting using small 6 inch pans and even cupcake pans. But I find that the the results that I wish to achieve are not scalable. For instance, mass is something that greatly influences crackage(call Webster, new word division). Also, the smaller the batch, the more problimatic the measurements not to mention temp and time changes. Nah, I'm afraid the most straight forward approach to advance the cause is to work to scale.
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Old 09-05-2006, 04:45 PM   #30
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OK where to start Oh ya *smack* leave the freakin baking soda out of your cheesecake or im gonna break your knees :)

Secondly use cocoa powder your new to the chocolate scene take it from someone that has won lindt chocoalte comps.. I use cocoa for the cheesecake its makes a great cheesecake

if you insist on fresh chocolate.... use this recipe

7 ounces bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
Three 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened
3/4 cup sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

no flour in this recipe or corn flour cause of the chocolate...
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