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Old 09-05-2006, 04:56 PM   #31
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I am preparing for another attempt. The following are some ideas I'm considering from all of your suggestions.

Still using stacked 10"springforms
  • 7 cream cheese bars
  • 3/4 cup flour (eliminate cornstarch)
  • 2 single ounce semisweet chocolates (swirled in)
  • 2 cups sugar
  • vanilla
  • 4 eggs + 3 yolks ???
  • 2 hour total baking time, first 15 mins @ 350, remainder @ 250
  • water tray
The eggs are the big enigma for me. For that last cake I eliminated 3 whites, representing a large amount of lost moisture. It was my impression that whites also creams the final baked texture, something I try to avoid. Yolks, I believe increases the breading of the final texture which I want. In any event, I'm at a loss to figuring out which if not both are aiding to the cracking of the top. It just might be, the best cheesecakes must crack !



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Old 09-05-2006, 05:02 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcast
I am preparing for another attempt. The following are some ideas I'm considering from all of your suggestions.

Still using stacked 10"springforms
  • 7 cream cheese bars
  • 3/4 cup flour (eliminate cornstarch)
  • 2 single ounce semisweet chocolates (swirled in)
  • 2 cups sugar
  • vanilla
  • 4 eggs + 3 yolks ???
  • 2 hour total baking time, first 15 mins @ 350, remainder @ 250
  • water tray
The eggs are the big enigma for me. For that last cake I eliminated 3 whites, representing a large amount of lost moisture. It was my impression that whites also creams the final baked texture, something I try to avoid. Yolks, I believe increases the breading of the final texture which I want. In any event, I'm at a loss to figuring out which if not both are aiding to the cracking of the top. It just might be, the best cheesecakes must crack !



The stacked pans just blows me away! You must take a picture of this cake this time. Also you mentioned that you wanted to avoid the creamy texture. I very much prefer a dense creamy cheesecake. To each his own though. You probably have a better pulse on what your intended audience prefers than me. Where are you located? Good luck!
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:02 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Chef_Jen
NEver fear JEN is here lol

OK where to start Oh ya *smack* leave the freakin baking soda out of your cheesecake or im gonna break your knees :)
ohhhh, I like this but please, not the knees
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:04 PM   #34
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The egg-yolks make the cheesecake more creamy while the egg whites contain the protien that help cause cracking. Let me explain. As protien is heated, it contracts. The egg is "glued" to the crust which prevents the custard filling from shrinking. But it wants to shrink. As the protiens pull in all different directions, the force causes the surface to crack.

This can be best avoided by turning off the oven and letting the cheesecake cool with the oven door partially propped open. The cheesecake must cool very gradually to create a perfect top. But usually, a perfect top isn't so important as most people put some type of topping on it which hides any cracks.

Both flour and corstarch act as thickening agents in the custard. But flour contains protien which just might make it harder to prevent the top from cracking. Cornstarch contains only starch, which thickens but retains it's original size as it cools.

If you need the custard to be more dense, add more cornstarch and delete the flour. The result will be a smoother end product.

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Old 09-05-2006, 05:11 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by vagriller
you mentioned that you wanted to avoid the creamy texture. I very much prefer a dense creamy cheesecake. To each his own though. You probably have a better pulse on what your intended audience prefers than me. Where are you located? Good luck!
yes, I live on Long Island, NY and it is much in the vein of the New York Cheesecake. The texture will cause a bite to break away without having to bite clean through it. The more creamy and dense version will not break away but rather pull through like ice cream would. This creamier product is what I've known to be called "cheese smear" apposed to cheesecake. I want my cheesecakes to have a texture more in keeping with other cakes.
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:20 PM   #36
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Thanx Jen for the cocoa idea. I was wondered about that every time I saw it in the store. But what is the relationship between flours and chocolate ???
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:24 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
The egg-yolks make the cheesecake more creamy while the egg whites contain the protien that help cause cracking.
I don't want the cracks and I want it to be less creamy and have a more break away texture. What if I do away with eggs altogether ???
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:25 PM   #38
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I think you'll have a mess, rd.
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:26 PM   #39
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ok to get the swirl pour 90% of your batter in the pan.. take the 10% mix with cocoa powder and swirl the 10% in with the 90% you can use this ratio for swirling any flavour of compounds..

I would add a touch of cornstarch as it does help with the cracking.
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:32 PM   #40
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I would add a touch of cornstarch as it does help with the cracking.
Thanx for solving the issue of how to get the swirl in cause I'm sure I would have gotten to that point and rubbed mah head

Can I do away with the flour and just use cornstarch and should I increase it to 1/2cup of cornstarch for 56 ounces of cream cheese ?
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