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Old 02-22-2012, 10:04 AM   #1
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Easy Chocolate Brownie Cheesecake

Our two favourite desserts are chocolate and / or cheesecake ... So, over the years, I have played about and have combined the two ...

Serves 10 to 12 ...

The Base:

250g unsalted butter chilled and diced
150g castor sugar
200g plain flour
50g cocoa powder

The Top:

100g good quality chocolate of choice ( I use Lindt )
100g good quality chocoate of choice different than the 1st one

400g Philadelphia cream cheese ( do not use fat free or low fat )
2 large eggs
40g castor sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
200 Ml. heavy cream
25g Pecans or Hazelnuts
25g Walnuts
Cocoa Powder for dusting

1) Preheat oven to 325 degrees farenheit or 170 centig degrees
29 First the base needs to be made; place the butter, sugar, flour and cocoa powder in a Food Processor and mix until the ingredients form a thick paste. Place this mixture in a greased 23cm spring clip tin and press onto the base to make a thick even layer. Chill in refrig. while creating the topping.

2) Crack the chocolate in pieces and put in a bowl ( heat proof ). Place the bowl over a pan of steaming water & gently melt. Stir frequently.

3) Remove the bowl and stir until smooth. Let cool 5 minutes. Put the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and eggs in Food Processor. Blend the ingredients.

4) Mix until thoroughly blended and scrape down sides of Food Processor from time to time.

5) With the machine running, add the cream cheese through the feed tube.

6) Then, the melted chocolate.

7) When completely mixed pour the mixture onto the base.

8) Spread the mixture evenly.

9) Finish by sprinkling the nut varieties ( garnish ).

10) place the tin on a baking tray in a preheated oven for 35 minutes and make sure the oven is turned off.

11) then remove the cake, let it cool by open window and chill overnight

12) Before removing from the tin; dust with cocoa.

*** serve with a cordial or semi sweet white wine or Port and Espresso.

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Old 02-22-2012, 10:17 AM   #2
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Sounds nice.

I will say, if you can get it (and you won't in Europe) that the Smithfield cream cheese (yes, from the same people that bring you bacon, ham and sausage) make cream cheese that truly rocks. I have switched to it for cheesecake.

I get it from the bagel guy in 3# blocks, but I have found it for sale in a couple of places in the standard 8oz package as well.
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Old 02-22-2012, 02:58 PM   #3
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Brands of Cream Cheese

I believe, Philadelphia is the only brand of cream cheese from the U.S.A. that I have seen in Madrid Capital ( and it always works for me )...

There are some Spanish brands, however, I trust Philadelphia when it comes to cheesecakes.

However, thanks alot for the info and feedback on the cream cheese that you recommend. I shall look at our Taste of America Supermarket -

Kind regards.
Margi.
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Old 02-22-2012, 04:08 PM   #4
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Philadelphia is not a bad brand, and is very popular for a reason.

That being said there are better, and with cheese cake using the best you can lay hands on is a good thing. Good luck finding Smithfield, though it appears it is hard to get here 200 miles from the source.
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Old 02-25-2012, 08:38 AM   #5
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Each region has its specialties

Ciao, Good Morning,

Smithfield is a brand which does not import to Spain or Italy at the moment ... so, we shall stick to Philadelphia. As previously stated, I trust it over Spanish varieties for cheesecakes.

In Italy, I combine a fresh Ricotta, Fresh Goat Cheese Spread and a local brand of cow creamed cheese ---

Have nice wkend,
MC.
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Old 02-25-2012, 01:39 PM   #6
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This sounds fantastic Margi! I have made something similar to this that called for a brownie mix on the bottom. It was great, but I can guess that your recipe will be even better! Thanks!
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Old 02-25-2012, 01:57 PM   #7
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@ Chopper: Chocolate Decadence

Thanks for ur lovely note. This is quite delicious and combines 2 fave desserts, a cheesecake and a brownie ...

M.C.
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:29 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
40g castor sugar
Just curious, why castor sugar? Castor oil is a very odd oil (the -OH radical mid-chain in the fatty acid) but I haven't found anything odd in the chemical structure of castor sugar.

Why not just plain sugar?
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:32 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Just curious, why castor sugar? Castor oil is a very odd oil (the -OH radical mid-chain in the fatty acid) but I haven't found anything odd in the chemical structure of castor sugar.

Why not just plain sugar?
Caster sugar is simply superfine cane sugar. Smaller grain size dissolves faster
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Old 02-25-2012, 09:42 PM   #10
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Okay I got it, confectioner's sugar, powdered sugar, super-fine sugar...
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