"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cakes & Cupcakes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-04-2011, 05:10 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia, Brisbane
Posts: 10
How to tell if cupcake is going to be dry

Hello all,

I have took up baking to fill up my spare time a few days ago and today has been my 3rd time baking. I have noticed that my batch of cup cakes today was dry compared to other days. I have read that there could be a few factors relating to the problem such as; leaving it in the oven for too long (BTW I use a convection oven as my normal one isn't working). I am wondering if there is a way of telling if the batch is going to be dry from just looking at the mixture and how to rectify it.

Thanks

Toan

__________________

__________________
bass_toan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 08:22 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
If you are using a mix, add two extra tablespoons of cooking oil to the recipe. That will make the cupcakes more moist and tender.

If using a - from-scratch - recipe, again, add an extra tablespoon or two of cooking oil.

The water in the batter can steam out of the cake, leaving you with a dry cupcake that resembles sawdust. Adding the extra oil allows the fat and water to emulsify together due to the egg yolk in the batter. This holds the moisture better, giving you the texture you desire.

Also, abke the cupcakes for a shorter period of time in a convection oven thatn the recipe suggests as the oven transfers heat into the food more efficiently than a regular oven. When the cupcake aroma begins to fill the house, it's probably done. Insert a toothpick into the largest cupcake to tell. When you pull it out, if it comes out without batter on it, you know that your cupcakes have completed cooking.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 09:04 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
If it is a scratch recipe, are you measuring the flour properly?

Make sure to fluff the flour, then spoon it into the measuring cup to overflowing and then use the back of a knife or your finger to level it off.

Just scooping from the bag or container can often compact the flour causing you to use too much. Scratch cakes are very sensitive to measurements.
__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 11:46 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia, Brisbane
Posts: 10
Thanks for the reply! I use scratch recipe and I'll take both of your advices into consideration for my next bake.

Chief Long wood: I prefer to use butter in my baking rather than oil is there a way without oil to hold the moisture?

Toan
__________________
bass_toan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 11:52 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
Oil will produce a more moist cake. A cake made with butter is best eaten at room temperature, since when chilled it will become stiff. Cakes made with oil remain soft even when chilled.

This cake uses a different style of mixing called the "paste" method. It comes out nice and moist and uses butter. I only use this method now for mixing vanilla/yellow cakes.
Tender White Cake: King Arthur Flour
__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 11:55 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by bass_toan View Post
Thanks for the reply! I use scratch recipe and I'll take both of your advices into consideration for my next bake.

Chief Long wood: I prefer to use butter in my baking rather than oil is there a way without oil to hold the moisture?

Toan
Don't give him a big head.
(referring to his name)
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 12:01 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia, Brisbane
Posts: 10
pacanis: :D

BakeChef: I guess converting to oil is the way to go...is there a amount of butter to oil rule I should follow? (I'm trying to keep to the recipes in a book I got from my friend) And im guessing normal olive oil for cooking and not some special baking oil?.......Sorry I'm very new.
__________________
bass_toan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 12:07 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,341
You should use a neutral flavored oil such as corn, canola or vegetable oils.

Butter is 80% fat so you should reduce the butter measurement by 80% and add that much oil. However, I've seen recipes work with a one to one substitution.

While the oil sub info is correct, over baking is also a possible reason for dryness. As little as one or two minutes of over baking can dry out your cupcakes. Since you said that this recipe is sometimes OK but was dry this time, I'd guess the issue is over baking rather than using butter.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 12:08 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
You can do a straight substitute with oil for butter, equal amounts. You can do this in a cake, but not in a cookie.

Olive oil could work, but you will want to use a very light one. I suggest a vegetable oil such as canola, safflower, corn or something else with no flavor, you may end up tasting the olive oil in a delicately flavored cake. Olive oil will perform the same but may taste different.
__________________

__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.