"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cakes & Cupcakes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-17-2009, 12:14 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
I agree that packaged cake mixes are a good way to learn the basics of baking before moving on to "from scratch" recipes.
__________________

__________________
Doug Collins
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 12:58 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: California
Posts: 111
It looks good, very good job Chile!!
__________________

__________________
Thaicooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 01:03 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chile Chef View Post
Thank you LPB, I will give your recipe a go when I make my next cake, By the way I forgot grease the bottom and the sides of the glass dish and it broke into pieces when I tired to pull it out of the dish.
You will need to first grease, then flour the inside surface of the cake pan to prevent the cake from sticking.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 01:10 PM   #14
Sous Chef
 
Chile Chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winter Park Fl, Or Bust!
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thaicooking View Post
It looks good, very good job Chile!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
You will need to first grease, then flour the inside surface of the cake pan to prevent the cake from sticking.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Thanks guys.

Hey Goodweed, Thanks for the tips I'll remember that for the next cake.
__________________
Chile Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 01:13 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chile Chef View Post
I should warn you though it's a cake mix you can buy from the store.

Soon I will attempt the whole thing and use gonosh as my chocolate frosting.
Good for you, Derek. We all have to start somewhere. and now you've started!

You'll have better luck finding the recipe for frosting you want though, if you spell it GANACHE.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 04:22 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
You will need to first grease, then flour the inside surface of the cake pan to prevent the cake from sticking.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
As an alternative, Crisco and others make a baking spray that includes canola oil and flour. It works very well.

__________________
Doug Collins
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 05:41 PM   #17
Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Oak Harbor, WA
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LPBeier View Post
Your cake looks great!

Here is my personal recipe for Chocolate frosting. I have adapted it from some of my other recipes and it works the best. You can use 1/2 butter, 1/2 crisco but I find for chocolate it is better to use straight butter. Make sure the chocolate is cooled a bit before you add it to the softened butter.

Chocolate Buttercream
1 cup butter not margarine, softened
3 oz unsweetened or bittersweet chocolate, melted
1 tsp. vanilla extract
4 cups icing sugar
3 tablespoons milk


Cream butter and melted chocolate with electric mixer. Add vanilla, then gradually add sugar, one cup at a time, scraping bowl often. Add the milk, 1 tablespoon at a time until frosting is smooth and fluffy.








Mmmmmmm, cut and pasted, thanks!
I'll get lots of use out of that one! It will save me tons of time making the real thing. YAY!
__________________
navywife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 05:54 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Chile Chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winter Park Fl, Or Bust!
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
As an alternative, Crisco and others make a baking spray that includes canola oil and flour. It works very well.

I have something like that, that I use and like I said I'll use it even on my class ware as well.


By the way guys since the cake is the same size and I have a twin bowl like in the photograph above, How long do I cook both cakes for and how do I have to adjust the temps?
__________________
Chile Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:21 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
Cake made in glass cake pans may take a bit longer to cook than in metal. Generally, to adapt a recipe from a metal dish to a glass dish, you should lower the baking temperature by 25 degrees and allow a bit of extra time in the oven.

Your cake looks to me as if the temperature may have been a bit high -- the heavy browning on the edges and the top make me think that. Too much heat also may account for the uneven top (it's much higher in the middle than on the edges). Check your oven temperature with a good oven thermometer and adjust the setting accordingly.

Time is only approximate when you bake something. Always check it a few minutes before the recipe says. With cakes, I rely first on touch -- poke it gently in the middle with your finger (quickly so you don't get burned) and if it bounces back, it's probably nearly done. Second, look at it -- generally a cake is done when it just begins to pull away from the sides of the pan. Third, use a toothpick -- stick it straight down in the middle of the cake and pull it straight out; if it comes out clean, the cake is done; if it has a few crumbs on it, the cake is probably done; if it has wet batter on it, the cake needs more time. Add only 5 minutes, then check it again.
__________________
Doug Collins
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 06:23 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Chile Chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winter Park Fl, Or Bust!
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
Cake made in glass cake pans may take a bit longer to cook than in metal. Generally, to adapt a recipe from a metal dish to a glass dish, you should lower the baking temperature by 25 degrees and allow a bit of extra time in the oven.

Your cake looks to me as if the temperature may have been a bit high do to the heavy browning on the edges. That also may account for the uneven top (it's much higher in the middle than on the edges).

Time is only approximate when you bake something. Always check it a few minutes before the recipe says. With cakes, I rely first on touch -- poke it gently in the middle and if it bounces back, it's probably nearly done. Second, look at it -- generally a cake is done when it just begins to pull away from the sides of the pan. Third, use a toothpick -- stick it straight down in the middle of the cake and pull it straight out; if it comes out clean, the cake is done; if it has a few crumbs on it, the cake is probably done; if it has wet batter on it, the cake needs more time. Add only 5 minutes, then check it again.
Thank you Scotch, I've followed the recipe to a t both bake time for each ban was 29-34 minutes and I've cooked it for 30 minutes, The toothpick came out very clean.
__________________

__________________
Chile Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.