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Old 08-09-2014, 11:58 AM   #1
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Large Fruit Scones

Hello All,

I am trying to make big fruit scones. I am a reasonably experienced baker and have baked lots of sweet cakes and pastries successfully in the past. I am trying to make scones - I have made fruit scones before but mine never seem to rise very much and always end up small and crumbly. Whenever I go to a cafe or hotel and order a scone they are always massive and I can never get mine that size. I have tried many different recipes and used baking powder. I even spoke to the chef at a luxury hotel near me who gave me his fruit scone recipe and I still can't seem to be able to make them very big. Please could you give me some advice/suggestions?

Many Thanks!

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Old 08-09-2014, 12:20 PM   #2
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Commercial kitchens have much larger pans and put more batter in them. So it is basically the same recipe that you use. But when you make them, you are making a smaller batch of batter, so your scones are not as high or as big as a commercial kitchen. You could try to put more batter in the pan and baking it for just a few more minutes.

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Old 08-09-2014, 12:53 PM   #3
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Hi, and welcome to DC

Can you provide the recipe you use that doesn't work? That would help us figure out what might be wrong with the ingredients or technique.
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:42 PM   #4
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Hi ows! Glad you found us.

Like GotGarlic stated, a recipe would be very helpful. I do make scones a lot. Generally speaking, I have found most recipes deliver a dry batter. I usually add a bit more liquid than called for after making a recipe for the first time. Once you try a recipe, you can play with it to make it work best for you.

Also, I find my Nordic Ware scone pan to be invaluable. I never have luck with scones made on a baking sheet, whether made drop-style or in one large, scored circle. These pans are a bit pricey but worth it if you make scones frequently. I have four, two 8-count and 2 16-count mini scones. You can find better prices than those listed at Nordic Ware (such as Amazon) but their catalog is just plain fun.
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:44 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ows View Post
Hello All,

I am trying to make big fruit scones. I am a reasonably experienced baker and have baked lots of sweet cakes and pastries successfully in the past. I am trying to make scones - I have made fruit scones before but mine never seem to rise very much and always end up small and crumbly. Whenever I go to a cafe or hotel and order a scone they are always massive and I can never get mine that size. I have tried many different recipes and used baking powder. I even spoke to the chef at a luxury hotel near me who gave me his fruit scone recipe and I still can't seem to be able to make them very big. Please could you give me some advice/suggestions?

Many Thanks!
I use the recipe from the Good Housekeeping cookery book (below). It never fails me but other recipes have been varying degrees of disaster.

I make them in the following quantities as I've found they aren't as successful if I double the recipe's quantities.

SconesThis is the basic mix for sweet scones. Add dried fruit, cranberries, nuts, etc as you wish - 2oz (50g) of "additives" go in with the dry ingredients before adding the yoghourt. You can make savoury scones by leaving out the sugar and adding 2-3oz of finely grated cheese and dried herbs of your choice with the dry ingredients.

8oz (250g)self-raising flour
1/2 level teasp salt
1 level teasp baking powder
2 oz (50g) butter (you can use hard marge eg Stork, if you like but butter tastes better)
1/4 pint (150ml) plain yoghourt
and a little milk or egg wash to glaze (optional)

Pre-heat a baking sheet in the oven - top shelf - 230C/450F/gas mark 8.

Sift the dry ingredients together. Rub in the butter until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs (this seems to be where American recipes and ours part company). Make a well in the middle and stir in enough yoghourt to give a fairly soft dough

Turn onto a floured surface, knead very lightly if necessary to remove any cracks. roll out to about 3/4 inch thick(I make mine a bit thicker than this) or pat out with your hand. Cut into rounds using a 2 inch cutter dipped in flour or cut into triangles with a sharp knife.

Take the baking sheet out of the oven(be careful, it's hot!)brush with the milk or egg wash and bake immediately at the top of the oven for 8-10 minutes (mind they don't burn but don't keep opening the door to look!) When cooked transfer to a wire cooling tray and allow to cool before buttering and eating, ideally the same day.

I find set yoghourt is best but I don't know why and if you can't find it just use any natural yoghourt full fat or low fat as you prefer. The recipe says milk but that doesn't work for me. I expect that you could use cultured buttermilk but natural yoghourt is usually easier to find. Sour milk used to be used in the days of raw milk but pasteurised milk goes bad, not sour, and shouldn't be used

This has never let me down in over 30 years but before I found it my scones would have made very good ice hockey pucks!

Good luck (you won't need it)
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:55 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Hi ows! Glad you found us.

Like GotGarlic stated, a recipe would be very helpful. I do make scones a lot. Generally speaking, I have found most recipes deliver a dry batter. I usually add a bit more liquid than called for after making a recipe for the first time. Once you try a recipe, you can play with it to make it work best for you.

Also, I find my Nordic Ware scone pan to be invaluable. I never have luck with scones made on a baking sheet, whether made drop-style or in one large, scored circle. These pans are a bit pricey but worth it if you make scones frequently. I have four, two 8-count and 2 16-count mini scones. You can find better prices than those listed at Nordic Ware (such as Amazon) but their catalog is just plain fun.
I find the same. Even with my never fail recipe quoted in my reply to the OP, I don't find a scored round works. No idea why.
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Old 08-11-2014, 05:15 PM   #7
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Off topic. What is the difference between scone and muffin batter?
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Old 08-11-2014, 06:17 PM   #8
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Off topic. What is the difference between scone and muffin batter?
You can't roll out muffin batter. Have a look at my scone recipe and compare it with your favourite muffin recipe.

I believe that what you call biscuits are more or less the same as our scones. Where as muffins are more cake-like.
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Old 08-11-2014, 06:23 PM   #9
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Are trying to say that scones batter more dry?


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Old 08-11-2014, 06:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
You can't roll out muffin batter. Have a look at my scone recipe and compare it with your favourite muffin recipe.

I believe that what you call biscuits are more or less the same as our scones. Where as muffins are more cake-like.
Not quite. Here's a good description of American and British names of baked goods: http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.bl...ked-goods.html
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