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Old 09-11-2006, 03:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Jen
she needs the flour in there.. and IMO shes using alright amounts of eggs
Thanks Jen, I agree.
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Old 09-11-2006, 04:07 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
From Cook's Thesaurus A leaven is anything that produces bubbles in dough or batter, causing baked goods to rise. Most breads rise because of yeast, which works by fermenting sugar, which in turn produces carbon dioxide. Baking soda and baking powder are used to leaven quick breads, cookies, and muffins. Baking soda is alkaline and reacts with acid to create carbon dioxide bubbles that become trapped within the batter. It's sometimes used in batters that contain acidic ingredients, like buttermilk or molasses. If there's not enough acid in the batter, the recipe will instead call for baking powder, which combines baking soda with one or more acidic salts. When the baking powder becomes wet or sufficiently hot, the soda reacts with the salts and releases bubbles. Air bubbles can also be trapped in beaten egg whites, a technique used to leaven angel food or sponge cakes.

I do not believe flour and cornstarch qualify as leavening agents.

"From my very first cheesecake to the present, I've struggled against the inevitable collapse most cheesecakes succumb to, if not during baking certainly as it cools. Trying to develop a light and airy texture that approaches a dense pound cake has proven problematic. The two most common methods used to lighten a cheesecake, I believe would be, (1) introduce air through beating the ingredients and (2) add or increase leavening components"

I know of few cheesecake recipes that call for leavening other than beating the ingredients.
My cheesecakes don't exactly "fall" as much as have the top collapse onto the cake.
"light and airy texture that approaches a dense pound cake" seems VERY much to me to be an oxymoron.

I guess I have only one question for you on this quest--have you tried actual recipes to achieve the results you desire?
This is most informative.
So you agree with my observation that egg white is a good stable medium for emulsifying air. Your belief that flour and cornstarch are not leavening agents could mean that my experiments for both of them rose only due to the fact both contain 1 egg each. So now I must surmise that the flour and cornstarch served only to preserve the leavening provided by the single egg. A most useful quality. Two other experiments, one with yolk and the other with egg white, both without flour or cornstarch, rose the same as the ones with flour and another with cornstarch except the egg alone collapsed far greater and shortly after they rose. Whereas the flour and cornstarch maintained most of its rise, even through cooling.

As I've said before, I'm not looking for recipes but the best understanding of the topic I can gain. Keep in mind that I said, "approaches a dense pound cake", approaches being the key word and no, I've never had the quality of texture I'm seeking. But I've come very close with the help of Jen and some of the others whom I will mention later.

I am very grateful for your involvement and wont forget it.

P.S. WOW, Gretchen !!! That was your 888th post, I'm most religious if that means anything to you.
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Old 09-11-2006, 04:14 PM   #13
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Like I said above, you emulsify liquids, not air.

Flour and cornstarch are thickeners and the gluten in flour provides structure to baked goods.

HOW BAKING WORKS is a good start to understanding the topic.

There are also loads of other technical resources on the science of baking.
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Old 09-11-2006, 04:56 PM   #14
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I'll do my best to be more clear in the future jennyema, Thank you !

All the best,
Robert
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Old 09-11-2006, 05:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Flour and cornstarch are thickeners and the gluten in flour provides structure to baked goods.
I use Gold Medal All-Purpose flour. Would there be a better brand and what would be the effect if I sift ?

As for other resources, there's also culinary school but I'm enjoying learning this way, trial and error, with the heartfelt advice from friends.
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Old 09-11-2006, 08:50 PM   #16
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What do you think ???

Prepare a spring form pan with your favorite coating and bottom crust.
Ingredients
  1. 4 cream cheese bars
  2. 1 cup sour cream
  3. 4 egg whites
  4. 1/2 cup flour
  5. 2 tbsp powdered buttermilk
  6. 1 tbsp vanilla
  7. 2 cups sugar
Bake at 375 for 30 minutes then reduce to 300 for 1 hour.

You know what I'm aiming for. Can you analyze my reasoning ???
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Old 09-12-2006, 07:45 AM   #17
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Have you tried using a bicycle pump, or one of those hydrogen tanks clowns use to make their voices high?
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Old 09-12-2006, 07:56 AM   #18
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HAHA That was funny Jason !
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Old 09-12-2006, 10:43 AM   #19
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"Trying to develop a light and airy texture that approaches a dense pound cake has proven problematic"

The above was in your original post - I'm confused as to what you are trying to achieve here. A light airy cheesecake that resembles a dense pound cake????

There are so many 'tried and true' pound cake recipes, I'm not even sure what it is you're trying to 'perfect'. I think you're working too hard at reinventing the wheel!
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Old 09-12-2006, 10:50 AM   #20
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..........using a bundt pan i think you will be disappointed
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