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Old 04-16-2013, 10:16 AM   #1
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Ricotta vs Sour Cream

I am into Cheese cake now. I have been using a recipe that calls for 4 packs cream cheese, 4 eggs, and 1 cup sour cream. Just found a new one from Bon Appetit that calls for Ricotta, cream cheese and no sour cream. Anyone have any experience with the two difference recipes? What would be the difference?

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Old 04-16-2013, 10:38 AM   #2
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The sour cream will provide a 'tang' you won't get with the ricotta. I'd go with the sour cream.

Also, I don't like ricotta.
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:07 AM   #3
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For me, it's really all about the acidity and texture.

Italians will probably disagree, but I find American style cheesecake (with cream cheese and sour cream) to have a nice creaminess and tangy flavor from the acidity of the sour cream.

I've had ricotta cheesecake. Full disclosure, I'm not a big fan of ricotta cheese to begin with. I find it has little flavor and kind of a "mealy" texture. I don't care for ricotta cheesecake for the same reason. While it has a lighter mouthfeel than American or NY style cheesecake, I have a hard time getting past the "cold cream of wheat" texture.
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:12 AM   #4
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I never met a cheesecake I didn't like, but am partial to cream cheese - smooth, creamy, and dense.

Cheesecakes made with cream cheese are 'New York' or 'Jewish' Cheesecakes, and ones made with ricotta are 'Italian' Cheesecakes, with both types having their roots in immigrant New York City neighborhoods.

Lindy's was one of my favorites.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Lindys-Cheesecake
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:33 AM   #5
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I have fooled around a lot with developing a ricotta cheesecake recipe. The taste was my biggest challenge. I ended up using 1 T. vanilla, 1 t. almond extract and 1/8th t. lemon oil, to get a satisfactory flavor. And I used a sour cream topping.
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Old 04-16-2013, 02:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GA Home Cook View Post
I am into Cheese cake now. I have been using a recipe that calls for 4 packs cream cheese, 4 eggs, and 1 cup sour cream. Just found a new one from Bon Appetit that calls for Ricotta, cream cheese and no sour cream. Anyone have any experience with the two difference recipes? What would be the difference?
Ricotta is made from the whey left over from Mozzarella cheese. No flavor. Sort of like cottage cheese. Or if there is it tends to be on the sweet side. As most know whey is the liquid left over from making cheese. It could be made from cow, goat or any milking female animal. Go for the sour cream. More tang and better flavor.
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Old 04-16-2013, 02:30 PM   #7
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I think you mean ricotta vs cream cheese. You will find many different combos, i.e. mascarpone instead of sour cream, etc. Try them all. ;-) & see what you like best.
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Old 04-16-2013, 03:21 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
Cheesecakes made with cream cheese are 'New York' or 'Jewish' Cheesecakes, and ones made with ricotta are 'Italian' Cheesecakes, with both types having their roots in immigrant New York City neighborhoods.
Now Cerise, I realize New Yorkers like to think they invented a lot of things, but the roots of cheesecake go back much further than New York City has been around. The Greeks were serving up the stuff at weddings at least 4,000 years ago. They made theirs from feta and honey, which really doesn't sound all that good when you think about it.

And while NY cheesecake is certainly delicious, other parts of the country also have their own variations that are equally good. I'm not absolutely certain, but I've always been under the impression that New York style cheesecake is defined by the addition of more yolks, as well as heavy (not sour) cream. At least most of the recipes I've seen seem to follow this methodology.

Growing up in the Midwest, we were usually treated to Chicago style cheesecake, which almost always has sour cream in the mix, along with cream cheese. Eli's is considered the gold standard.
http://www.elicheesecake.com/

Where I grew up, we called it "American style cheesecake". Probably because I didn't grow up in Chicago. I don't know. Maybe we used the term to differentiate it from the New York style. Anyway, this recipe is pretty close to what I grew to love.
chicago cheesecake recipe - the zen kitchenthe zen kitchen

By the way, the Lindy's recipe sounds delicious. Thanks for sharing! I'll have to try it.
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Old 04-16-2013, 03:33 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Now Cerise, I realize New Yorkers like to think they invented a lot of things, but the roots of cheesecake go back much further than New York City has been around. The Greeks were serving up the stuff at weddings at least 4,000 years ago. They made theirs from feta and honey, which really doesn't sound all that good when you think about it.

And while NY cheesecake is certainly delicious, other parts of the country also have their own variations that are equally good. I'm not absolutely certain, but I've always been under the impression that New York style cheesecake is defined by the addition of more yolks, as well as heavy (not sour) cream. At least most of the recipes I've seen seem to follow this methodology.

Growing up in the Midwest, we were usually treated to Chicago style cheesecake, which almost always has sour cream in the mix, along with cream cheese. Eli's is considered the gold standard.
- Eli's Cheesecake

Where I grew up, we called it "American style cheesecake". Probably because I didn't grow up in Chicago. I don't know. Maybe we used the term to differentiate it from the New York style. Anyway, this recipe is pretty close to what I grew to love.
chicago cheesecake recipe - the zen kitchenthe zen kitchen

By the way, the Lindy's recipe sounds delicious. Thanks for sharing! I'll have to try it.
Now, Mr. Kroll (LOL), I didn't claim to invent it, etc., it came from The Dictionary of American Food & Drink.

Perhaps I should have added that "Americans have come to know cheesecakes made with cream cheese as 'New York' or 'Jewish' Cheesecakes, and ones made with ricotta as 'Italian' Cheesecakes, with both types having their roots in immigrant New York City neighborhoods. "

Read more: NY Cheese Cake Recipe & Video - Joyofbaking.com *Video Recipe*

The point is, it can be ricotta or cream cheese, with any variations in between.

Enjoy Lindy's. (I didn't invent that on either. LOL)
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Old 04-16-2013, 03:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
Now, Mr. Kroll (LOL), I didn't claim to invent it, etc., it came from The Dictionary of American Food & Drink.

Perhaps I should have added that "Americans have come to know cheesecakes made with cream cheese as 'New York' or 'Jewish' Cheesecakes, and ones made with ricotta as 'Italian' Cheesecakes, with both types having their roots in immigrant New York City neighborhoods. "

Read more: NY Cheese Cake Recipe & Video - Joyofbaking.com *Video Recipe*

The point is, it can be ricotta or cream cheese, with any variations in between.

Enjoy Lindy's. (I didn't invent that on either. LOL)
Where does the sour cream variety fit in?
I thought the OP was looking to substitute ricotta for sour cream and both of their recipes contained cream cheese
Disclaimer: I am cheese cake challenged. I can count the number of times I've eaten cheese cake on three fingers, so I've never even looked at a cheese cake recipe.
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