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Old 10-16-2009, 07:58 AM   #11
Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Novutopia, Germany
Posts: 56
Amazing,
thank you,
there will be still a lot of work on this cookingbook,
thank you everybody, really great support!
I will sent a PM to Dillbert,
i was already adviced by the Forum AdMins that this is a forum
about only cooking and nothing else, and i am very happy to answer him
about his questions.
I took all the advices and now the recipe looks like this:

Blueberry cream cheesecake
fresh and fruity
Dough:
  • 250 g flour
  • 125 g butter
  • 80 g sugar
  • 1 egg
Cheese cream:
  • 80 g sugar
  • 80 g vanilla pudding mix
  • 1 organic lemon
  • 3 eggs
  • kg quark cheese
    (if not available mix 450 g ricotta with 50 g sour cream)
  • l sweet cream
Topping:
  • l sweet cream
  • kg frozen or fresh blueberries



Dough:
Cut the butter into small pieces, mix the ingredients and quickly knead them to a dough. Wrap it into a plastic foil and leave it for minimum 2 hours in the fridge.
Roll the dough and cover a cake tin bottom and edge with it, bake it at 190 for about ten minutes and let the cake cool down.
Filling:
Grate the peel of the lemon and squeeze the juice out.
Divide the eggs and put the egg whites separate. Whip the yolks with the sugar until creamy, then add the cheese, the pudding powder and the lemon peel and -juice.
Whip the egg whites until they are stiff and do the same with the sweet cream.
Carefully fold the egg whites and whipped cream with the cheese-mixture so that it becomes a fluffy cream. Spread it over the cooled cake and bake it in the oven at the same temperature for about 60 minutes. Let it cool down (actually it tastes best if you do the steps up to here already one day before so that the cheesecake can really settle).
Topping:
Whip the cream very stiff and carefully mix in the blueberries. Decorate according to your taste.
Variations:
Try only the cheesecake without topping and add to the filling either rum raisins or tangerine pieces (out of a can or fresh).
Vary the topping as you like, also cherries taste very good or gooseberries, be inventive!
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Old 10-16-2009, 10:33 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 280
Some other suggestions...

"Plastic foil" should probably be "plastic wrap", if you mean the clear plastic kind. Foil refers to a silver wrap made from aluminum.

I would want to know how thin to roll the dough for the crust. And/or, I'd want to know how far up the sides of the cake pan the crust should go.

I'd also change the word "cake" to "crust" in the "filling" part of the directions. Pies, tarts, cheesecakes, etc usually have crusts - thin unrisen shells with topping or filling. Cakes are leavened, have structure, and are usually the main event themselves. Cakes are usually frosted. "Cake tin" is OK as that is the name of the pan. You could alternately call it a round baking pan, and give the diameter. In the US we'd call it a round 8" baking pan or a round 9" baking pan.

Lastly, this line here is a little awkward: "(actually it tastes best if you do the steps up to here already one day before so that the cheesecake can really settle)." This kind of direction is often put in a short description or comment given at the very beginning of a recipe, before the ingredient list. It would say something like, "This cheesecake can be baked, cooled, and refrigerated up to X days in advance. For best flavor make the day before you serve it. Wait until just before serving to make the topping and add it to the cheesecake."

HTH!
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Old 10-17-2009, 10:58 AM   #13
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Novutopia, Germany
Posts: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by apple*tart View Post
Some other suggestions...

"Plastic foil" should probably be "plastic wrap", if you mean the clear plastic kind. Foil refers to a silver wrap made from aluminum.

I would want to know how thin to roll the dough for the crust. And/or, I'd want to know how far up the sides of the cake pan the crust should go.

I'd also change the word "cake" to "crust" in the "filling" part of the directions. Pies, tarts, cheesecakes, etc usually have crusts - thin unrisen shells with topping or filling. Cakes are leavened, have structure, and are usually the main event themselves. Cakes are usually frosted. "Cake tin" is OK as that is the name of the pan. You could alternately call it a round baking pan, and give the diameter. In the US we'd call it a round 8" baking pan or a round 9" baking pan.

Lastly, this line here is a little awkward: "(actually it tastes best if you do the steps up to here already one day before so that the cheesecake can really settle)." This kind of direction is often put in a short description or comment given at the very beginning of a recipe, before the ingredient list. It would say something like, "This cheesecake can be baked, cooled, and refrigerated up to X days in advance. For best flavor make the day before you serve it. Wait until just before serving to make the topping and add it to the cheesecake."

HTH!
Apple!
thank you, this i also will put in, now i check all the expressions with the
creator of the recipe,
great, thank you again
ciao
eiasu
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Old 10-18-2009, 07:56 AM   #14
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Novutopia, Germany
Posts: 56
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by apple*tart View Post
Some other suggestions...

"Plastic foil" should probably be "plastic wrap", if you mean the clear plastic kind. Foil refers to a silver wrap made from aluminum.

I would want to know how thin to roll the dough for the crust. And/or, I'd want to know how far up the sides of the cake pan the crust should go.

I'd also change the word "cake" to "crust" in the "filling" part of the directions. Pies, tarts, cheesecakes, etc usually have crusts - thin unrisen shells with topping or filling. Cakes are leavened, have structure, and are usually the main event themselves. Cakes are usually frosted. "Cake tin" is OK as that is the name of the pan. You could alternately call it a round baking pan, and give the diameter. In the US we'd call it a round 8" baking pan or a round 9" baking pan.

Lastly, this line here is a little awkward: "(actually it tastes best if you do the steps up to here already one day before so that the cheesecake can really settle)." This kind of direction is often put in a short description or comment given at the very beginning of a recipe, before the ingredient list. It would say something like, "This cheesecake can be baked, cooled, and refrigerated up to X days in advance. For best flavor make the day before you serve it. Wait until just before serving to make the topping and add it to the cheesecake."

HTH!
hallo,
few more questions apperared:
if i use wrap it become:
Wrap it into a plastic wrap ,
which other verb could i use? instead of wrap ... wrap

and i cannot use a round cake pan since the picture refers to a rectangular cake!

Another question about the crust,
it is a sort of "fine adjustment" or you feel really necessary to change it?

I ask this just because if i am going to "fine-adjust" all the book i will grow old and still the book will be not finished! ;)

thank you very much
ciao
eiasu
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Old 10-18-2009, 10:31 AM   #15
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Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,300
Cake and crust really do bring to mind two different images for Americans.
When someone says to "wrap in plastic" we understand it to mean plastic wrap.
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Old 10-18-2009, 11:49 AM   #16
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Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Novutopia, Germany
Posts: 56
Thank you wyogal,
here another questions,
how could i better write this sentence?

Put the olive oil in a pan enough to just cover all the bottom with a fine layer of it and put it on a small fire
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