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Old 08-01-2006, 02:33 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Jen
Glad you enjoyed my cake and my recipe :)
LMBO, the conversion of your grams(for heaven's sake) was more than I bargained for, tho' I muddled through it. It was more your advice taken in total that won the prize.

You should see how it slices. OMG, it is brilliant and sooo bootylicious. I did add the vanilla and juice from two lemons and the zest from one.

Some things I'm thinking of changing like incorporating the whites by wooden spoon and adding the sugar at the first with the cheese. The sugar which is dry in appearance melts to add fluidity while beating the cream cheese.

Should it matter at what point to introduce the corn starch? It was my very last ingredient.
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:41 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by rdcast
You should see how it slices. OMG, it is brilliant and sooo bootylicious. I did add the vanilla and juice from two lemons and the zest from one.
Did you take any pics? I will have to remember to take pics of the next cake I make. I might make one for company this weekend!

Have you tried lime juice in the cake? It is very good too, and most people are not expecting it.
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:44 PM   #13
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I like lime juice i also like blood orange juice..

meh doesnt really matter when you put in the cornstarch i guess
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:46 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkath
....but where's the exact recipe? Jen, do you have it nearby to post?
Jen's exact recipe stands on its own merits and will produce an outstanding product no doubt. I did give up in trying to convert grams into standard when considering the difference between volume and weight. Jen did an excellent job in explaining it to me but, duh. Besides I add flour and the extra yolks to achieve the add breadyness I insist on.

Her tutorial on binding properties, detailed explanations on cause and effect along with technically advanced procedures was even more valuable.

Thanks again Jen,
Robert
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:47 PM   #15
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I don't know how you got all that into a 10" pan!

Here's my recipe:

Cheesecake

For the Crust:


2 1/3 C Graham Cracker Crumbs
1/2 C Unsalted Butter, melted
1/4 C Sugar


For the Filling:


2 Lb Cream Cheese, room temp.
1 1/2 C Sugar
1/4 C Flour
5 Eggs
16 Oz Sour Cream
1/4 C Milk
1 T Vanilla Extract


Make the Crust:
Position the oven rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 375 F.


Wrap the outside of a 10-inch-diameter springform pan with heavy-duty foil.

Combine all the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse just until the crumbs are moist.

Press the crumb mixture firmly onto the bottom and 2 inches up the sides of the prepared pan. Use a flat bottomed glass or measuring cup to press the crumbs into place.

Bake until the crust begins to brown, about 8 minutes. Transfer the pan to a cooling rack. Maintain oven temperature.

Make the Filling:
Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese and sugar in a large bowl until will blended then beat in the flour.


Add the eggs 1 at a time, beating just until combined. Beat in the sour cream, milk and vanilla. Pour the filling into the crust.

Place the springform pan in large roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into the roasting pan to come half way up the sides of pan.

Bake the cheesecake until just set in center and top is slightly puffed and golden brown, about 1 hour.

Turn off oven and keep the door closed. Leave the cake in the oven for 1 hour.

Remove springform pan from roasting pan and remove the foil. Cool it on a cooling rack for a couple of hours. Refrigerate at least 6 hours. Cover and refrigerate overnight before removing from the pan.
To remove the cake from the pan, first run a thin bladed knife around the inside of the pan to separate the cake from the side of the pan. Remove the springform sides.

Place the cheesecake with the pan bottom on a burner and heat it for about 10 seconds. This will soften the butter in the crust so you can slide the cake off the pan bottom onto a serving plate. Use a long frosting spatula or knife blade to ease the transfer.
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:54 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
Did you take any pics? I will have to remember to take pics of the next cake I make. I might make one for company this weekend!

Have you tried lime juice in the cake? It is very good too, and most people are not expecting it.
Yes, I also like lime juice but I hate the appearance of the green zest so I use lemon zest anyway. My favorite is orange zest and Jen's suggestion of blood orange sounds great. But I'm getting tired of having to tell her thanks, hahaha, jk. You know how much I appreciate your generosity Jen.
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:55 PM   #17
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When pressing the crust up the sides of the pan, it helps to wrap you fingers in saran wrap. That way the butter stays in the crust, not on your hands.

Andy,
That recipe looks similiar to mine.
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:04 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
When pressing the crust up the sides of the pan, it helps to wrap you fingers in saran wrap. That way the butter stays in the crust, not on your hands.

Andy,
That recipe looks similiar to mine.
You mean Jen stole it from you? Oh my!!!I bet she hits hard, just funnin with ya Jen.

Thanks for that Andy and I started out with her use of plastic wrap to line the pan, but had trouble making it stay. That's something I really want to learn to save on the use of foil.

P.S. no pix yet, presentation needs improving but wait till you see! lol, *going for another slice*
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:08 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
When pressing the crust up the sides of the pan, it helps to wrap you fingers in saran wrap. That way the butter stays in the crust, not on your hands...

I use a flat-bottomed and straight-sided measuring cup to pack down the crumbs on the bottom and sides.
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:10 PM   #20
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Also, I read that overbeating the batter is the primary cause of cracking. I've always felt it was caused by the cooking and cooling process.
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