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Old 08-01-2006, 01:29 PM   #1
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Cool Thank you DiscussCooking and Jen

I would like to thank this forum and all its members for the outstanding advice I've received. To Jen, thank you for pouring out all that you know concerning my many questions.

From what I've learned has produced the finest cheesecake I've ever baked. I don't remember having eaten such a marvelous cake possessing all the qualities I was hoping for.

It would have taken me months of trial-n-error before I could have produced such a cake.

Thanks again to all
Robert

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Old 08-01-2006, 01:41 PM   #2
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Care to post the exact recipe you used? As if anyone follows the recipe to the letter, but anyway. Please?
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:45 PM   #3
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The type of cheesecake I prefer is one with a stand-up bready quality. This requires an extra yolk or two with some amount of flour. I believe there is nothing that can be done to avoid such a recipe to prevent severe cracking. My solution was to slice off the top and flip it upside down to provide a ruled appearance.

Early in it's baking a fair amount of rising occurred before it began to crack. Toward the end of baking and throughout its cooling, it lost most all of the rise. Is there anyway of preserving that beautiful rise?
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:49 PM   #4
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I make a NY style cheesecake that has the classic heavy texture. I have no problem with a cracking top.

Did you use a water bath? What was your cooling process.
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:51 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
Care to post the exact recipe you used? As if anyone follows the recipe to the letter, but anyway. Please?
I'd be honored to do just that. Bear with me as I refine that first go so I may relate it legibly.

All the best
Robert
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcast
Early in it's baking a fair amount of rising occurred before it began to crack. Toward the end of baking and throughout its cooling, it lost most all of the rise. Is there anyway of preserving that beautiful rise?
It cannot maintain that rise as it cools. And that is fine with me, as it usually rises above the top of the pan. I prefer to cover the pan while transporting it, so that rise would be an issue. Taste is most important anyway. There is something to be said for presentation, and I strive to achieve the finest looking cake possible, but it all comes down to taste in the end. My recipe calls for a thin sour cream topping, so any cracks are covered.
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:56 PM   #7
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Glad you enjoyed my cake and my recipe :)
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:14 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I make a NY style cheesecake that has the classic heavy texture. I have no problem with a cracking top.

Did you use a water bath? What was your cooling process.
Andy, I've never had a problem with cracking either but then I've never used as much flour(1/3cup) or corn starch(1Tbsp) or the amount of egg yolks(8). Keep in mind I used 3 lbs. of cream cheese with 1/3 cup sour cream and 2 full cups of g/s. This requires a minimum 10 in. pan.

I would never bake a cheesecake without humidifying the oven. I always reduce the temperature in three steps, From it's high of 450(15min) to 350(20min) to 200(40min), in general, as long as the center jiggle isn't lost. Then I leave it in till it can be removed with bare hands with no problem.

That amount of flour, corn starch and egg yolks is going to make it a **** of a project to prevent the cracking. What do you think?
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:16 PM   #9
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....but where's the exact recipe? Jen, do you have it nearby to post?
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Old 08-01-2006, 02:24 PM   #10
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but of course

Baked Cheesecake

Cream Cheese 850gr
Sugar 250gr
Cornstarch 20gr
Sour Cream 50gr
Lemon Juice 1
Eggs 6
Cream- heavy or coffee 280gr- warm

Graham Cracker Mix 100gr
Melted Butter 30gr
  • Bring Cheese to room temperature
  • Preheat Oven to 325F
  • Brush a spring form pan with butter and link with cracker mix
  • Cream the first 5 ingredients together
  • Add the Eggs one at a time scrape down the bowl every so often
  • Finally add the warm cream and mix well
  • Reserve about 10% of the mix for marbling
  • Flavour the remaining 90% with a compound (chocolate, strawberry etc)
  • Pour into a prepared spring form pan
  • Flavour the other 10% with chocolate or vanilla and marble the surface of the cake
  • Bake for approx 1 hour DO NOT OPEN OVEN for first half an hour. To prevent cracks allow to cook in oven with oven off and door slightly open
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