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Old 12-02-2005, 01:54 AM   #1
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Tiramisu Sponge Cake Technique

I know someone gave me the website on all tiramisu recipes, and i have pretty much got that down. However my main concern is how to create that super soft, light fluffy texture in the sponge. How long are you suppose to leave it in the oven? How long in the fridge? How much of the espresso coffee am i suppose to add to the sponge so that the sponge is not overly wet with that stuff?

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Old 12-02-2005, 10:24 AM   #2
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For traditional Tiramisu, savoiardi, or lady finger type biscuits are used, not the sponge cake. Its softness/moistness comes from dipping each biscuits in coffee (this is done by just quickly coating the entire surface, not waiting until the whole thing gets soggy), and after everything is laid down, by soaking up the moisture from the mascarpone cream. If you want to use the sponge cake though, just soak the bottom with diluted espresso, spread just to cover the bottom...
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Old 12-02-2005, 10:30 AM   #3
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yep, the savoiardi urmaniac referred to are a little on the crunchy side. not as hard as most biscotti, because they are much lighter, but they are definitely not soft like spongecake.
the whole trick to getting a tirsamisu right is how log you dip the savoiardi in espresso. just a second or two in the bowl of espresso, flip, a second or two more, then out.
if you are going to use spongecake, you'll have to be very careful to control the amount of moisture from dipping, and from the moscarpone whip, or it will be very soggy, especially on the bottom. err on the side of a little too dry, and it should work out.
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Old 12-02-2005, 10:46 AM   #4
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Unless you are going for an extra super strong coffee flavour or suffering caffeine deprivation, make sure to dilute the espresso with about the same amount of water or more for dipping the biscuits... Some people add marsala wine or some other liqueur here, although we usually add the marsala into mascarpone mixture instead. I think it is just a matter of preference, works fine either way...
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:11 AM   #5
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I like kahlua in my tiramisu. You can't go wrong with that. :)
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:58 AM   #6
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I have made tiramisu before with a spongecake. I know its not traditional but it can work. The key is technique and not to get it so overly moist that it falls apart.

I bake the cake per instructions. Not more not less. I normally bake mine in a sheetpan if I use it for Tiramisu. Next I let it cool completely. I then cut it into long finger like peices.

I use strong coffee for my tiramisu not espresso. I don't use marsala either because we are not into alcohol exception is extracts which are in a miniscule amount. So I add 2 tsps of almond and vanilla extract to the cream. I also skip the eggs.

I layer the spongecake fingers in a pan and then drizzle the strong coffee over it using a small tsp. I then pat the cake with a pastry brush to ensure even distribution of the cofee. Next goes the cream then cake again and the same technique finishing with the cream and then shaved chocolate along with unsweetened cocoa powder. Leave it in the refrigerator for atleast 12 hours. I find it really brings the flavor together.

The tiramisu may be a bit softer but not much. If by accident it does get soft no big problem, serve it in a martini glass with one of those hazelnut wafer cookies and viola no one will know :-).

I personally find the ladyfingers easier to use but I am open to other ingredients if I don't have them handy.
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Old 12-02-2005, 08:48 PM   #7
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Cool thanks for your help guys. I saw a betty crocker sponge cake tiramisu technique, and i will look into it. I know the traditional method uses lady fingers, but i want to experiment a little with sponge cake. I am also trying to make this desert a little bit more nutritious, light and healthy.

For example, instead of using sugar, i am going to use splenda for baking (1/2 sugar, 1/2 splenda)
Next, for the sponge cake, i am going to add my latte/capaccuino flavored whey protien powder
and i am going to try to find light mascarpone cheese.
ill keep u guys updated. thanks!
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Old 12-03-2005, 08:40 AM   #8
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i like your changes to the recipe buff. i'm always looking for healthier ways to make the foods i love. does they whey powder taste ok on it's own, or is it better used as a flavoring agent in other dishes?

now if they would only make calorie and fat free moscarpone that tasted good...
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Old 12-03-2005, 02:58 PM   #9
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well there are several whey protien powders that have that flavor, but use a lot of artificial ingrediants and flavors (as a downpoint) but the good point is that it has no sugar, almost no fat, and almost no cholesterol.
i emailed the company to give me a sample of the latte flavor whey protien to make sure it suits me tastes before i purchase it.

if you go to this website: www.si03.com (its a zero and 3 at the end)
click on store, and look for nectar latte whey protien flavor, thats what i will be purchasing if i like the taste.

also, on a side note, can you make sponge cake using whole wheat flour instead of all purpose flour? Whole wheat flour is a bit more fiber. Has anyone tried making any cake using whole wheat flour?
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