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Old 03-05-2016, 11:15 AM   #1
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Cocoa powder, which to use?

I am trying to find out what kind of coca to use for cookies. The recipe I have in the recipe book calls for 1/3 a cup of hershey cocoa. Now I am confused on which one to get as Hershey has natural unsweetened and special dark cocoa.

I have also found nestle cocoa a little cheaper than the hershey brand. Is there a big difference between the 2 brands?

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Old 03-05-2016, 11:23 AM   #2
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Make sure you get cocoa powder. Here is what the containers look like.

http://www.hersheys.com/pure-product...s.aspx?id=4809

Nestle Toll House Cocoa Powder, 8 oz - Walmart.com

Much of what Nestles sells is for a hot cocoa beverage so be sure to avoid that.
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Old 03-05-2016, 01:11 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giacona View Post
I am trying to find out what kind of coca to use for cookies. The recipe I have in the recipe book calls for 1/3 a cup of hershey cocoa. Now I am confused on which one to get as Hershey has natural unsweetened and special dark cocoa.

I have also found nestle cocoa a little cheaper than the hershey brand. Is there a big difference between the 2 brands?
I suspect that since your recipe specifies "Hershey's" cocoa, the recipe was developed by that company or came from one of their package labels. Whatever the case, it doesn't matter if you use that brand or not, what's most important is that you use unsweetened cocoa. The "special dark" variety is unsweetened but is a deeper, more intense chocolate flavor. I always have some of that on hand in the event I want to gear up the chocolate flavor of a recipe that calls for cocoa.

Any brand of unsweetened cocoa can be used in your recipe but, as Andy has pointed out, steer away from the sweetened varieties that are used to make flavored milk or instant hot chocolate.
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Old 03-05-2016, 04:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giacona View Post
I am trying to find out what kind of coca to use for cookies. The recipe I have in the recipe book calls for 1/3 a cup of hershey cocoa. Now I am confused on which one to get as Hershey has natural unsweetened and special dark cocoa.

I have also found nestle cocoa a little cheaper than the hershey brand. Is there a big difference between the 2 brands?
Go to the Hershy's site and see if there is a recipe for the dark chocolate cookies. Sometimes it is the same recipe as the regular and sometimes not. When I compared the Chocolatety Chocolate Cake for the regular recipe to the one for the dark chocolate, one recipe called for vegetable oil and the other didn't. The recipes seemed to vary between the two even though they are the same product.
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Old 03-06-2016, 08:21 AM   #5
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Thanks everyone. I am actually using a hershey's bake shoppe cookbook. I did check online and the recipe is the same and does not mention natural unsweetened or special dark. It just calls for 1/3 cup of hersheys cocoa.

I will make sure I do get the cocoa powder for baking, and not the other one.

Appreciate the help of everyone here
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Old 03-06-2016, 08:37 AM   #6
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If they just called out cocoa, they are referring to natural unsweetened, not special dark.

Special dark is a blend of regular natural and Dutch process, therefore the acidity level is different. When you change the acidity you have to adjust the other ingredients in order for the leaveners to achieve the best rise. The difference won't be huge, but it will be less than perfect if you don't balance e the other ingredients.
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Old 03-06-2016, 09:05 AM   #7
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Hershey usually will show which can of cocoa with the recipe. The original chocolate cake shows a picture of the "the original Hershey" cocoa. The second recipe that calls for no vegetable oil shows the Extra Dark Cocoa. The same goes for all their recipes.
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Old 03-06-2016, 11:46 AM   #8
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In the actual cookbooks, which the OP says she's using, there isn't a picture of a cocoa can for each recipe.

Natural unsweetened cocoa is acidic. It is usually paired with baking soda, which is alkaline. The dutching process neutralizes the acidity, making Dutch cocoa neutral pH. It usually gets paired with baking powder, which has an acid added to the baking soda.

Special Dark, which is not exactly the same as extra dark, is a mixture of natural and dutched cocoa powders. This makes it darker than natural, but leaves the acidity somewhere between. If you are baking and using baking soda or powder as a leavener, you need to adjust the acid level accordingly. Since special dark is a mixture, not one or the other, I can't tell you how much to adjust.

The acid level can be adjusted either by changing the ratio of baking powder to baking soda, or by adding an acidic ingredient like buttermilk or lemon juice, or cream of tartar.

By the way, Dutch process cocoa, while darker than natural,is also milder in flavor, not stronger.

In a recipe, if Dutch process is not specified, the default is ALWAYS natural unsweetened.

All of this only matters if you are baking. If you are making candy, ice cream, sauces, etc, use anything you want.
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Old 03-06-2016, 12:45 PM   #9
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Hershey usually will show which can of cocoa with the recipe. The original chocolate cake shows a picture of the "the original Hershey" cocoa. The second recipe that calls for no vegetable oil shows the Extra Dark Cocoa. The same goes for all their recipes.
If there was a picture, I don't think the OP would be here asking which to use
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Old 03-06-2016, 03:18 PM   #10
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Use a unsweetened alkalized cocoa powder. This is what I use....

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