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Old 07-31-2004, 09:30 PM   #1
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ISO Sugar Cookies

I'm looking for a really good sugar cookie recipe, but one that I can drop, because I'm perfectly awful at rolling (too much flour and too much sticky dough = yuck).

I'd prefer ones with margarine or vegetable oil, but butter and shortening are all right too. Thanks!

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Old 09-02-2004, 06:44 PM   #2
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This is actually a snickerdoodle recipe, but i dip the tops of the cookies in colored sugar instead of rolling in cinnamon and sugar. the are soft and chewy and absolutely delicious. I use a medium sized cookie scoop to shape and drop the cookies and they come out perfectly round and uniformed in size. I know this uses butter, but it's such a great recipe, I couldn't not share it with you.

Enjoy!

Laurie

p.s. They uncooked dough freezes extremely well. After the cookies are shaped and dipped in sugar, put them on a parchment lined cookie sheet until they are frozen.....then store in a zip top bag. Bake at the same temperature adding about 2 min to the baking time.

Sugar Cookies

1/2 cup butter (1 stick), softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

Topping

2 Tablespoons Granulated Sugar

1 teaspoon cinnamon


1. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugars with an electric mixer on high speed. Add the egg and vanilla and beat until smooth.

2. In another bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking soda, and cream of tartar.

3. Pour the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and mix well.

4. Preheat oven to 300 degrees while you let the dough rest for 30 to 60 minutes in the refrigerator.

5. In a small bowl, combine the sugar with the cinnamon for the topping.

6. Take about 2 1/2 tablespoons of the dough and roll it into a ball. Roll this dough in the cinnamon/sugar mixture and press it onto an ungreased cookie sheet. Repeat for the remaining cookies.

7. Bake the cookies for 12 to 14 minutes and no more. The cookies may seem undercooked, but will continue to develop after they are removed from the oven. When the cookies have cooled they should be soft and chewy in the middle. (http://www.topsecretrecipes.com)

Makes 16 to 18 cookies.
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Old 09-02-2004, 10:04 PM   #3
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I love when my mom makes snickerdoodles at Christmas time. I've never made them. I noticed they always call for cream of tartar, and
no other recipes do. I hate to buy it just for that. What do you think
would happen if the cream of tartar was omitted?
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Old 09-02-2004, 10:40 PM   #4
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I'm not sure what exactly the cream of tartar does, but they are so yummy as is, it's worth the investment. I think the cream of tartar is a stablizer of sorts. I'm sure someone else here can speak to what purpose it serves better than I can. I don't know how long cream of tartar lasts once it is opened. does it loose it's effectiveness like baking powder and baking soda?

i think you can usually buy fairly small containers. it doesn't matter anyway.......once you make these, you'll make 'em often and you'll use up the cream of tartar!!!!!

laur
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Old 09-03-2004, 01:33 AM   #5
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Ask Rainee.....she'll know.....heheheh.....well she will
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Old 09-03-2004, 09:40 AM   #6
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Rainee Will know. I have and eggless one (because of my cousin) just ask if you want me to post because I have to find the book.
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Old 09-03-2004, 09:56 AM   #7
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General Description
Cream of Tartar is a natural, pure ingredient left behind after grape juice has fermented to wine.

CREAM OF TARTAR

Tartaric acid is a brownish-red acid powder (potassium bitartrate) that is precipitated onto the walls of casks used to age wine. When refined into a white acid powder, ‘cream of tartar’, it is used in baking.

Cream of tartar is an acid powder. Combined with baking SODA it makes baking POWDER.

Cream of tartar is also used to give a creamier texture to sugary things like candy and frosting and to stabilize and increase the volume of beaten egg whites.

Cream of tartar can be used to clean brass and copper cookware.
The answer is, there is not a good substitution. If cream of tartar is used along with baking soda in a cake or cookie recipe, omit both and use baking powder instead. If it calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

Normally, when cream of tartar is used in a cookie, it is used together with baking soda. The two of them combined work like double-acting baking powder. When substituting for cream of tartar, you must also substitute for the baking soda. If your recipe calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

One teaspoon baking powder is equivalent to 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar. If there is additional baking soda that does not fit into the equation, simply add it to the batter.

Remember when making substitutions in baking, you may end up with a somewhat different product. The taste, moisture content, texture and weight of a product can be affected by changing ingredients.
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Old 09-03-2004, 11:24 AM   #8
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how do you say......TOLD YA SO.....nicely???? lmao......thanks Rainee!
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Old 09-03-2004, 09:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainee
General Description
Cream of Tartar is a natural, pure ingredient left behind after grape juice has fermented to wine.

CREAM OF TARTAR

Tartaric acid is a brownish-red acid powder (potassium bitartrate) that is precipitated onto the walls of casks used to age wine. When refined into a white acid powder, ‘cream of tartar’, it is used in baking.

Cream of tartar is an acid powder. Combined with baking SODA it makes baking POWDER.

Cream of tartar is also used to give a creamier texture to sugary things like candy and frosting and to stabilize and increase the volume of beaten egg whites.

Cream of tartar can be used to clean brass and copper cookware.
The answer is, there is not a good substitution. If cream of tartar is used along with baking soda in a cake or cookie recipe, omit both and use baking powder instead. If it calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

Normally, when cream of tartar is used in a cookie, it is used together with baking soda. The two of them combined work like double-acting baking powder. When substituting for cream of tartar, you must also substitute for the baking soda. If your recipe calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

One teaspoon baking powder is equivalent to 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar. If there is additional baking soda that does not fit into the equation, simply add it to the batter.

Remember when making substitutions in baking, you may end up with a somewhat different product. The taste, moisture content, texture and weight of a product can be affected by changing ingredients.

Thanks, that's more information about cream of tartar than anyone could ever imagine. I only know how to use it when beating egg whites.
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