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Old 02-12-2012, 12:59 PM   #11
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Good point about the liquids. Of course liquids are easiest to measure by volume because most liquid ingredients tend to be uniform, unlike flour which can change its volume depending on handling.

I wish the US could switch to metric units and then we wouldn't have any conversion problems, other than updating old recipes. But I guess updating old recipes would take forever.
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:35 AM   #12
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I've been wanting to switch all my recipes over to weight, because it is soooooo easy to add ingredients to the bowl sitting on the scale, and not have to dirty 4 measuring cups, or try to scrape honey or peanut butter out of the cup. Because of the varying answers I've found for volume to weight conversions, I'm a little afraid to rely too much on this handy converter I found. I would really appreciate it if someone with more experience in this area would take a look at some of the conversions and tell me whether they seem accurate. It would really give me peace of mind. Here is the site:

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:28 AM   #13
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I would recommend you do your own conversions as you use the recipes. When you make a recipe, measure by volume as always then weight the results and record them.

Doing them one at a time makes it not a big project so easier to do. Also, everyone measures differently so you would be incorporating your measuring approach into your recipes.
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:38 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I would recommend you do your own conversions as you use the recipes. When you make a recipe, measure by volume as always then weight the results and record them.

Doing them one at a time makes it not a big project so easier to do. Also, everyone measures differently so you would be incorporating your measuring approach into your recipes.
Excellent idea Andy. I've done that with some of my recipes. Why didn't I think to write that?
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Old 05-05-2012, 12:31 PM   #15
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That sounds like a lot of work lol. I suppose that is what I will have to do though. I'm in the middle of typing up all my recipes, and I plan to print them on card stock, cut them up to index sized recipe cards, and laminate them. I can have volume and weight measurements on there, which will be nice. I had a few hand written laminated ones, and it it so nice not having to worry about getting them wet or dirty. You just wipe it with a damp cloth before it goes back in the recipe box. Unfortunately I wrote them out with this new fangled erasable pen, which uses the heat caused by the friction when erasing to make the ink disappear, so when I moved, and the recipe box what's sitting in my hot car... Well, I've never seen so much hard work literally disappear lol
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Old 05-05-2012, 12:34 PM   #16
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That sounds like a lot of work lol. I suppose that is what I will have to do though. I'm in the middle of typing up all my recipes, and I plan to print them on card stock, cut them up to index sized recipe cards, and laminate them. I can have volume and weight measurements on there, which will be nice. I had a few hand written laminated ones, and it it so nice not having to worry about getting them wet or dirty. You just wipe it with a damp cloth before it goes back in the recipe box. Unfortunately I wrote them out with this new fangled erasable pen, which uses the heat caused by the friction when erasing to make the ink disappear, so when I moved, and the recipe box what's sitting in my hot car... Well, I've never seen so much hard work literally disappear lol
Any way you look at it, it will be a fair amount of work. But, doing it one recipe at a time spreads it out, so it doesn't seem to be as much. You will get better results by converting the way Andy describes, so in the long run, it will be less work.
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Old 05-05-2012, 01:27 PM   #17
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...I plan to print them on card stock, cut them up to index sized recipe cards, and laminate them....

THIS sounds like a lot of work and expense.

I print all recipes on 8.5x11 sheets of paper and put them in a three-ring binder. If I need to make a change, or if a recipe gets soiled, I just make the changes and reprint. The cost of paper and ink is less than the cost and effort to cut up and laminate cards. That said, you already have an investment in cards so forget I said anything.

BTW, you can buy card stock in many sizes and set up your printer to print directly onto that size card. Saves some time and revisions are easier.
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:06 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.

THIS sounds like a lot of work and expense.

I print all recipes on 8.5x11 sheets of paper and put them in a three-ring binder. If I need to make a change, or if a recipe gets soiled, I just make the changes and reprint. The cost of paper and ink is less than the cost and effort to cut up and laminate cards. That said, you already have an investment in cards so forget I said anything.

BTW, you can buy card stock in many sizes and set up your printer to print directly onto that size card. Saves some time and revisions are easier.
It's easier to get consistent results on a full size sheet, in my opinion, and laminating doesn't take long at all. Also, card stock isn't that expensive, so it's not that much of an investment. I like the convenience of having the single card rather than a whole three ring binder, otherwise I would probably like that idea just as well. To each their own :)

Actually I think typing them up in the first place is the most labor intensive part
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:19 PM   #19
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I typed all my recipes into my computer, and then I backup that data frequently (on different media). When I want to work from a recipe I can either bring it up on the computer and look at the screen, or print out the recipe and work from the copy. I sometimes make revisional notes on the printout, then take that back and update it on the computer. This also makes it easy to share recipes with friends and family. You either print out a copy and hand it to them, or you can email it to them.
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:54 PM   #20
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It's easier to get consistent results on a full size sheet, in my opinion, and laminating doesn't take long at all. Also, card stock isn't that expensive, so it's not that much of an investment. I like the convenience of having the single card rather than a whole three ring binder, otherwise I would probably like that idea just as well. To each their own :)

Actually I think typing them up in the first place is the most labor intensive part

Typing is the most effort for me. I wish I had learned to touch type years ago. Who knew I'd be spending so much time in front of a keyboard.

When I'm making a recipe from my cookbook, I often take it out of the binder. Sometimes I just have it on the counter and other times I'll hang it by the stove so it's handy there.

As long as there is a process for recipe storage and preservation, you're in good shape. You like yours, I like mine. At least we have one. My sister has a hodge podge of recipes, some here, some there, some only in her head.
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Recipe Conversion - Help! I am making cookies, but the recipe is from the UK, can you make sure these conversions are correct, as I want to get it right the first time! Here is the recipe by the way: [url]http://i.imgur.com/TMSva.jpg[/url] 220g plain flour = 1.75 cups 120g butter = .5 cup 260g unrefined caster sugar=1.25 cups Thanks 3 stars 1 reviews
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