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Old 02-09-2012, 08:56 PM   #1
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Recipe Conversion - Help!

I am making cookies, but the recipe is from the UK, can you make sure these conversions are correct, as I want to get it right the first time! Here is the recipe by the way: http://i.imgur.com/TMSva.jpg

220g plain flour = 1.75 cups
120g butter = .5 cup
260g unrefined caster sugar=1.25 cups

Thanks

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Old 02-09-2012, 09:43 PM   #2
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That's pretty right. The conversion for flour holds only for flour measured by gently spooning the flour into the measuring cup and will be off if dipped from the bin using the measuring cup.

The sugar is right. The butter is within a half tbsp.
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Old 02-09-2012, 09:44 PM   #3
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Try this link. It might be some help. Recipe Calculator Converter - Weight and Measure Conversions for Recipes
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Old 02-09-2012, 10:10 PM   #4
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Just noting the perhaps obvious, these are all weight to volume (or volume to weight) conversions, and each will have to be vetted depending on the specific ingredient. Each relies on the density of the ingredient (how much weight per volume), and ingredients subject to sifting rely on how much they are refined or sifted. There is no single weight/volume or volume/weight conversion. You have to consider every ingredient or ingredient class before making the conversion.

Is this common that Americans rely on volume units while Europeans rely on weight units? It seems to me that the weight units would be far more reliable. Volume relies on packing density. Weight just is.

I'd rather switch to weight units.
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Old 02-10-2012, 02:57 AM   #5
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I am having a problem with conversions as I bake bread a lot. It seems 3 cups of flour can be anywhere from 380g to over 400g. I recently started using weight instead of volume, as it's more accurate but the recipes may only give volume, so you don't know which 3 cups of flour they mean, 384, 400 or ????? Try converting 3 cups of flour to grams, 3 different searches, 3 different answers. They say to take an average after weighing it out because of the weather. To much confusion when baking, which is more of a science than cooking!!! Oh well.
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:55 AM   #6
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Google it! Just type in the quantity listed in the recipe, followed by in <U.S. measurement>.

For example "225 grams of flour in ounces" or 225 grams of flour in cups" to get either an estimate or an exact conversion
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Old 02-10-2012, 12:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
I am having a problem with conversions as I bake bread a lot. It seems 3 cups of flour can be anywhere from 380g to over 400g. I recently started using weight instead of volume, as it's more accurate but the recipes may only give volume, so you don't know which 3 cups of flour they mean, 384, 400 or ????? Try converting 3 cups of flour to grams, 3 different searches, 3 different answers. They say to take an average after weighing it out because of the weather. To much confusion when baking, which is more of a science than cooking!!! Oh well.
I use KA flour for my bread. They list 30g as a 1/4c on the bag. Makes a cup 120g.

Different manufacturers have different weights, but that isn't difficult to find if you know who made the flour.
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Old 02-10-2012, 12:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I use KA flour for my bread. They list 30g as a 1/4c on the bag. Makes a cup 120g.

Different manufacturers have different weights, but that isn't difficult to find if you know who made the flour.

Exactly!

Just look at the nutrition label. It tells you what you need to know to convert volume to weight.
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:27 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Alix View Post
I used this: Flour volume vs weight conversions | Grams | Ounces | Cups | Pounds | Kilograms | Quarts for flour and sugar, just wanted to be sure.

Heh, and someone changed the title of this thread! It was "a few conversions", and changed to "Recipe Conversion - Help!" Haha, it wasn't that urgent, very odd!

BTW, the cookies turned out well with the original conversions. Next time I may try mashed banana instead of chips.
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Just noting the perhaps obvious, these are all weight to volume (or volume to weight) conversions, and each will have to be vetted depending on the specific ingredient. Each relies on the density of the ingredient (how much weight per volume), and ingredients subject to sifting rely on how much they are refined or sifted. There is no single weight/volume or volume/weight conversion. You have to consider every ingredient or ingredient class before making the conversion.

Is this common that Americans rely on volume units while Europeans rely on weight units? It seems to me that the weight units would be far more reliable. Volume relies on packing density. Weight just is.

I'd rather switch to weight units.
European recipes are mostly weight based. Liquids tend to measured by volume, not weight

Generally, if a Danish recipe calls for "a cup" or "a tablespoon", they mean the exact amount isn't all that important. They mean to use a cup out of your cupboard or a tablespoon you would use to eat with.
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Recipe Conversion - Help! I am making cookies, but the recipe is from the UK, can you make sure these conversions are correct, as I want to get it right the first time! Here is the recipe by the way: [url]http://i.imgur.com/TMSva.jpg[/url] 220g plain flour = 1.75 cups 120g butter = .5 cup 260g unrefined caster sugar=1.25 cups Thanks 3 stars 1 reviews
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