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Old 12-17-2009, 04:26 PM   #1
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Thin, crispy edges on choco. chip cookies

This is going to be hard to put into words but... here goes.

My mother used to make chocolate chip cookies that, for lack of a better description... melted down onto the sheet in a way that the edges were crispy and brittle... and also very thin so that it was basically sharp on the edges. The middle would still be soft and the edges thin, sharp and browner than the middle.

I don't know what she used (and unfortunately she's gone now), so I've just been trying the various "standard" chocolate chip cookie recipes found online. What I get are fine, typical round "rounded" edge chocolate chip cookies. However, the edges are just sort of loafy and rounded, and if I bake extra time they just dry out.

Anyone know what the hell I'm talking about? I must sound like a maniac. If anyone had had similar cookies with a "crunch" (not just just dried out) I'd love to hear techniques.

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Old 12-17-2009, 05:05 PM   #2
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Yes, I do know what you are talking about and no, you are NOT a maniac.

This would be a dough which uses straight butter and little or now baking soda or baking powder so they are not cakey. Also bake them at 375 - 400 degrees Fahrenheit. The high heat and butter would promote fast "melting" of the dough so it spreads out instead of rising. I find the old Hershey's recipe using more butter would give me this affect when I wanted it. But make sure you bake them for a shorter time and keep an eye on them.
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Old 12-18-2009, 07:47 AM   #3
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These are excellent - crispy edges and chewy centers:
Chewy Delicious Chocolate Chip Cookies - 17113 - Recipezaar
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Old 12-18-2009, 10:09 AM   #4
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It's called "spread"

LPBier is right. Butter, higher heat and no baking powder will get you flatter, crispier cookies.

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Old 12-18-2009, 01:32 PM   #5
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I'm confused... are you guys saying use more butter, or less of something else and replace it with butter? More butter less flour?
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Old 12-18-2009, 03:12 PM   #6
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No, don't substitute butter for flour - they have two different functions in a cookie.

If your recipe calls for 1/2 cup butter and no other fat products (margerine, shortening, etc.) then use, say 3/4 cup of butter and everything else the same.

If your recipe calls for just margerine, shortening or oil, replace this with the same amount of butter.

If the recipe calls for both butter and shortening, margerine or oil, then just add butter, to the amount called for for both.

I might have the old Hershey's recipe somewhere. If I do find it I will PM it to you.
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Old 12-20-2009, 10:34 AM   #7
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OK I tried it with all butter and no baking soda. They did run like crazy but were also very tasty. I had to bake them longer to get them to solidify.
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Old 12-20-2009, 12:13 PM   #8
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Maybe do it again with all butter, and use half the amount of baking soda.
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Old 01-09-2010, 01:12 AM   #9
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I kinda want to do the opposite...make my cookies more puffy...so abit more baking power/soda? and all shortening?
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:00 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshatdot View Post
I kinda want to do the opposite...make my cookies more puffy...so abit more baking power/soda? and all shortening?
Joshatdot, don't try both at once. Check that link that jennyema provided and read that thread its a good one. Then with your recipe, use more shortening, less butter to start with and see how it goes. The other thing you can do is chill your dough a bit before baking. It will keep the cookie together better when baking and you can still keep the yummy butter flavor.

tzakiel, have you tried them again recently to get what you wanted? I wanted to add that you might try a higher temp for a shorter time to get those crispy edges.
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