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Old 02-28-2008, 09:39 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by swish2 View Post
You may try adding more milk chocolate. Try 2 or 3 oz. more milk choc. When using milk chocolate instead of semi sweet you need to reduce the cream or add more milk choc.
ok will do. I had to freeze them for an hour before the party because left at room temprature they are really soft. They really liked em. Said it was the best truffles they have ever had. The cheese cake was a hit to. any way im gonna try it again and liek you said, im going to add less cream and more chocolate. maybe 6 oz cream rather than 7
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Old 06-09-2008, 08:12 PM   #12
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I realize this is rather late but I think I can help. I am a candymaker so I make truffles a lot. Ganache is pretty simple but there are some things most people don't know. With a couple of small pieces of advice I think you will be on your way to even better truffles.

First of all, when making ganache for truffles, there is a ratio of liquid to chocolate. I say liquid and not cream because you must add the weight of any liquid flavoring (raspberry puree, liquor, etc. (butter does not get calculated as a liquid)) to the weight of the cream to get a total weight of liquid. The weight of the chocolate should be about 2 times the liquid amount for dark chocolate (semisweet, bittersweet, etc.) and 2.5 times the liquid amount for milk and white chocolate.

A second thing most people don't know is that even though it has cream in it, ganache does not need to be refrigerated. It can be stored at room temperature with no ill effects. In fact, refrigerating ganache usually makes it softer when you try to roll it at room temperature.

If you get pretty close to the ratios I gave you, and don't refrigerate or freeze the ganache, you should be able to roll the ganache into balls at room temperature without much mess even bare handed. You also should dip them at room temperature, there isn't a need to refrigerate or freeze them before dipping.

I hope this helps.
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Old 06-10-2008, 09:48 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by LT72884 View Post
It has been in the fridge for over 8 hours and it has not hardened. its in the stage of almost hardened but soft enough to scoop out with my finger. its almost like the filling in trifles not truffles.
I worked with a girl years ago who brought the office each o jar of home made hot fudge sauce. But it wasn't her intent. She'd tried to make truffles the night before mixing a batch of ganache, it never hardened either, but was thickish and sort of runny so she jarred it and called it hot fudge sauce. Some times chocolate is an odd duck to figure out.
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Old 06-10-2008, 12:50 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Ephrem View Post
I realize this is rather late but I think I can help. I am a candymaker so I make truffles a lot. Ganache is pretty simple but there are some things most people don't know. With a couple of small pieces of advice I think you will be on your way to even better truffles.

First of all, when making ganache for truffles, there is a ratio of liquid to chocolate. I say liquid and not cream because you must add the weight of any liquid flavoring (raspberry puree, liquor, etc. (butter does not get calculated as a liquid)) to the weight of the cream to get a total weight of liquid. The weight of the chocolate should be about 2 times the liquid amount for dark chocolate (semisweet, bittersweet, etc.) and 2.5 times the liquid amount for milk and white chocolate.

A second thing most people don't know is that even though it has cream in it, ganache does not need to be refrigerated. It can be stored at room temperature with no ill effects. In fact, refrigerating ganache usually makes it softer when you try to roll it at room temperature.

If you get pretty close to the ratios I gave you, and don't refrigerate or freeze the ganache, you should be able to roll the ganache into balls at room temperature without much mess even bare handed. You also should dip them at room temperature, there isn't a need to refrigerate or freeze them before dipping.

I hope this helps.
i think it had something to do with the chocolate this time.. the first time i made this stuff, it worked out because i used 55% cocoa baking chocolate rather than half semisweet chips and half milk chocolate chips. im thinking the milk in the chips added more liquid.
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Old 06-10-2008, 04:56 PM   #15
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Ephrem, thanks so much for the valuable info on making ganache. I live in a warm and humid (tropical) environment. This time of year, cream does not whip well, so I was thinking about making a ganache frosting for a special cake I want to make. Any special issues with humidity/heat? Do you think it is possible? Thanks - we told you we'd put you to work here!
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Old 06-10-2008, 09:30 PM   #16
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I will reply first to LT2884's comment before Karen's.
The milk in the milk chocolate is not liquid milk like whole milk or 2%. Chocolate has a long shelf life, about 1 year for milk chocolate and 2 years for dark. The milk that is in the chocolate is a dehydrated powder of some kind usually. Chocolate on its own contains almost no moisture whatsoever. The problem with half semisweet, half milk chocolate is the ratio I mentioned. The first time probably worked because you had close to the right ratio of dark chocolate to cream (liquid). This time if you made it half milk and half semisweet but did not change the amount of cream it will make the ganache softer. Perhaps an example will help:

I said in my earlier post that dark chocolate should be two times the amount of liquid. I also said that milk chocolate should be 2.5 times the amount of liquid.

Suppose you have a dark chocolate ganache that is 8 oz. cream and 16 oz. semisweet chips. If you decide to make it half milk chips and half semisweet the ratios must be calculated for each type.
The new ganache would be 8 oz. cream, 8 oz. semisweet chips, and 10 oz. milk chocolate. This is because your 8 oz. of semisweet chips would be 2 times 4 oz. of the cream (50%). The 10 oz. of milk chocolate chips would be 2.5 times 4 oz. of the cream (the other 50%).

If you wanted the semisweet and milk chocolate to each be half of the chocolate amount you would have to adjust the amount of cream. If you had 8 oz. of semisweet and 8 oz. of milk chocolate the cream would have to be reduced to 7.2 oz.

It is difficult to explain with out being able to talk to you in person but I hope this helps.
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Old 06-10-2008, 09:43 PM   #17
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Karen,

Humidity and heat are both enemies of chocolate and, by extension, ganache. In a perfect world the temperature should be below 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celsius). The humidity should be below 50%. Depending on your budget and the size of the room you work in, it would be worth considering the purchase of a window air conditioner and/or a dehumidifier. In my own work I work in a small room with both of these. I can hold the ideal temp and humidity very well even when it is over 100 degrees outside! Even without either of these, the closer you can get to the ideal, the better.

As far as a ganache frosting goes I would need more information. I don't know much about cake decorating so I hope you can excuse my ignorance. Is it a butter or a cream ganache? What are the steps involved in making the ganache frosting? Also what are the temperature and humidity in the room you are working in? Keep me posted.
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Old 06-10-2008, 09:58 PM   #18
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Oh Brother Ephrem, I think I'd better find an alternative. Our house is a Mexican style house, i.e., parts of it are open and there is no practical way to air condition it. I do have ocean and mountain breezes flowing through every day, and lots of ceiling fans, but the indoor temp this time of year is seldom below 80-85F and the humidity is the same, maybe even higher. The recipe I was looking at was a cream ganache, and was actually for cupcakes.

Here is the recipe:
8 ounces semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

3/4 cup heavy cream

optional flavoring:: coffee liqueur, framboise, rum...

FOR THE GANACHE, put the chocolate in a medium heatproof bowl. In a small saucepan, bring cream to a boil. Pour the cream over chocolate and shake the bowl gently so cream settles around the chocolate. Set mixture aside until chocolate is soft, about 5 minutes. Whisk gently until smooth, taking care not to incorporate too many air bubbles. Stir in one of the flavorings, if desired.



DIP the tops of the cooled cupcakes into the frosting. Let cakes stand on rack until frosting is completely set.

Do you think it would just never set? Probably I'd better stick with buttercream.

Thanks so much for helping!
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:11 AM   #19
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Even though the temperature and humidity are high, I think I would give it a shot anyway. It isn't a large amount of ingredients and you could always half it again with no ill effects. If you were working with just chocolate I would be more concerned about the humidity but I think the heat is more of an issue. Semisweet chocolate melts and tempers at around 85-90 degrees as does a ganache made with semisweet chocolate.
I would try to make the ganache at the coolest part of the day. It is also good to have a good airflow over the setting ganache, once it is on the cupcakes. Even if the ganache works initially, you must at least keep the cupcakes below 85 degrees. If the temperature climbs above 85 the ganache may melt and run.
If you decide to try it let me know how it went.

Good Luck!
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Old 06-11-2008, 09:45 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ephrem View Post
I will reply first to LT2884's comment before Karen's.
The milk in the milk chocolate is not liquid milk like whole milk or 2%. Chocolate has a long shelf life, about 1 year for milk chocolate and 2 years for dark. The milk that is in the chocolate is a dehydrated powder of some kind usually. Chocolate on its own contains almost no moisture whatsoever. The problem with half semisweet, half milk chocolate is the ratio I mentioned. The first time probably worked because you had close to the right ratio of dark chocolate to cream (liquid). This time if you made it half milk and half semisweet but did not change the amount of cream it will make the ganache softer. Perhaps an example will help:

I said in my earlier post that dark chocolate should be two times the amount of liquid. I also said that milk chocolate should be 2.5 times the amount of liquid.

Suppose you have a dark chocolate ganache that is 8 oz. cream and 16 oz. semisweet chips. If you decide to make it half milk chips and half semisweet the ratios must be calculated for each type.
The new ganache would be 8 oz. cream, 8 oz. semisweet chips, and 10 oz. milk chocolate. This is because your 8 oz. of semisweet chips would be 2 times 4 oz. of the cream (50%). The 10 oz. of milk chocolate chips would be 2.5 times 4 oz. of the cream (the other 50%).

If you wanted the semisweet and milk chocolate to each be half of the chocolate amount you would have to adjust the amount of cream. If you had 8 oz. of semisweet and 8 oz. of milk chocolate the cream would have to be reduced to 7.2 oz.

It is difficult to explain with out being able to talk to you in person but I hope this helps.
thanx...

I appreciate the huge amount of info that i never new exsisted for making this stuff. LOL. glad you could share this. I am going to have to read this a few times to grasp the concept.
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