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Old 11-05-2008, 11:17 PM   #11
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Well, I'm no chocolatier. Nor have I ever attempted to temper chocolate, much less make it from scratch (cocoa beans). Queen-Guinevere, if you say that chocolate cannot be remelted and retempered a multitude of times, I bow to your experience.

tonymac, I'm truly sorry, but I've never heard of anyone purchasing the ingredients to make solid, tempered, chocolate, other than by buying and processing cocoa beans into it's constituent forms and combining those products into what we know of as "chocolate". Every time I've seen a chocolatier doing their business, they always melt some store-bought chocolate, with the exception of Chef Torres.

I remember as a kid, we had an urban legend that chocolate bars contained wax. I think I have actually seen "parafin wax" as an ingredient in chocolate bars. This would act as a stabilizer, as does the soy lecithin. However, I always understood that the key ingredient was the cocoa butter, is it will actually crystallize when mixed properly with the other ingredients.

Have you thought about possibly apprenticing under a chocolatier and learning how they practice their craft and trade?
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Old 11-06-2008, 11:46 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
Well, I'm no chocolatier. Nor have I ever attempted to temper chocolate, much less make it from scratch (cocoa beans). Queen-Guinevere, if you say that chocolate cannot be remelted and retempered a multitude of times, I bow to your experience.

tonymac, I'm truly sorry, but I've never heard of anyone purchasing the ingredients to make solid, tempered, chocolate, other than by buying and processing cocoa beans into it's constituent forms and combining those products into what we know of as "chocolate". Every time I've seen a chocolatier doing their business, they always melt some store-bought chocolate, with the exception of Chef Torres.

I remember as a kid, we had an urban legend that chocolate bars contained wax. I think I have actually seen "parafin wax" as an ingredient in chocolate bars. This would act as a stabilizer, as does the soy lecithin. However, I always understood that the key ingredient was the cocoa butter, is it will actually crystallize when mixed properly with the other ingredients.

Have you thought about possibly apprenticing under a chocolatier and learning how they practice their craft and trade?

Well that kinda explains something similar I read as to the fact it will soldify with cocoa butter - which is actually realitely expensive!

As fun as it was learning, I have succumb to the prices of Tesco Milk Cooking Chocolate lol. Well, the first time I attempted to make some chocolate I added some milk to make it milkier. I also want to make it creamier at some stage. However, this meant it didn't solidify so well - in fact I made a mousse so it appeared :) - now how can I add different flavourings and stuff to my mix without messing it up? My initial thought was some cocoa powder but then I think I should be adding cocoa butter instead...

Any ideas?
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:34 AM   #13
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One thing to remember about chocolate, is that chocolate is fat-based, not water-based. Melting dark chocolate, then adding milk, will cause it to sieze (turn grainy and nasty). If you want to add flavors, you need food-grade essential oils. Spearmint and/or peppermint oil mixed with chocolate is a classic. If you can find any hazelnut/filbert oil, that would be another good combo.
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Old 11-28-2008, 05:07 PM   #14
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Wow, this sounds really complicated. My mother gave me and advent calendar for Christmas and I would like to remove the chocolate, wash the mold, and make milk-free chocolate for my son to replace it with. I just wanted to whip up a mixture and let it harden in the mold. Do I have to do any of that tempering stuff? I just want something fast and easy? How would I do it?
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Old 11-28-2008, 06:52 PM   #15
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B'sgirl, what you want to do is as simply as what you wrote. What tonymac is attempting to do is way complicated, more for an experienced baker/chocoletier.

You can purchase carob discs or other "chocolate" discs which contain parafin or other ingredients other than the milk you are trying to stay away from. Gently heat them, or if it comes in bars or chunks, chop them into evenly sized pieces, and gently and slowly heat them either over a double boiler, slowly in the micro while stirring between zaps, or if you are brave, over direct heat with a close eye. You'll want to stir this often and once evenly melted, drop by the spoonful into your molds. Tap the mold gently several times on the countertop so that any air bubbles will rise to the top and pop. Let set until firm. Don't put it in the frig to "rush" it or think you are going to "speed set" the chocolate, as that will cause it to discolor, have dark and shiney spots, get grainy, and other undesirable results. Just let it firm up at room temp, away from heat or drafts, and you'll have success.

If you need more help, let me know.
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Old 11-29-2008, 11:49 AM   #16
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Awesome! Thanks!
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Old 12-05-2008, 08:01 PM   #17
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Hello,

I am in the UK and having trouble finding a simple article helping me with this.

I want to make my own chocolate and use my moulds so create my own chocolate bars. I want to make something nice for a partner - and possibly sell customised chocoalte in the local area.

I cant find the ingrediants anywhere - I don't want to grind my own cocoa beans and want to make in home.

I received this reply on Yahoo:

So for clarity, if I buy this cocoa powder (gojiking . co . uk /shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=27&products _id=121) then is this suitable?

It says 'powdered sugar', is this a special type of sugar or can I go to tesco and buy some slow calorie granulated sugar - i'm thinking not so where do I get this from?

'healthy balance butter spread' - what the heck is this? Can I just use normal butter or is it a type of cocoa butter? As somewhere else I read it requires cocoa butter...??..
Like the website I was looking at sells this: gojiking . co . uk /shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=160

I want to make a couple of 200gram bars but no website gives the quantities in measurements and I do not want any going to waste as cocoa powder is not cheap...
Maybe if someone has a recipe and what quantity it produces I can break it down to smaller portions......


ALSO, as you know I will put it in my moulds and the chocolate I want to produce I want to place in my moulds and I assume they harden up when they cool to be like normal chocolate.......

What if I produce too much,store it in the fridge, re-heat and mould at a later date, is this acceptable with regards to quality ect...

I would really appreciate your feedback and guidance as I am a little lost......


Thanks
Hi Tonymac,

"I want to make my own chocolate and use my moulds so create my own chocolate bars. I want to make something nice for a partner - and possibly sell customised chocoalte in the local area."

Making your own chocolate and making chocolates to sell are two very different processes, IMHO.

I would advise you to concentrate on selling chocolates (added value) and not making chocolate, unless you have a few hundred thousand pounds to invest in machinery, as used by chocolate makers in the UK and Europe - and you are not going to get this at the moment, in the credit crunch era in which we now live!

All the best,
Archiduc
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