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Old 02-06-2005, 05:23 PM   #1
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Paraffin?

i was watching an episode of Paula Deans Cooking and i saw that see put parrafin in to chocolate. would the parrafin chocolate mixture work well for a coating of Truffles?

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Old 02-06-2005, 07:53 PM   #2
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In most of the rest of the world ourtside the Americas the word "parrafin" is used to describe a product that is burnt for heat, removing rust, and in a slightly purified form, for powering jet engines.

It is highly inflamable, and quite toxic for human consumption.

While I understand what you mean, many may not outside the above borders.

This is a prime example of "same" English words having totally different meanings in different localities.

And if you DO put it in your truffles, make sure you do not "pass gas" as is said in the States, near an open flame.
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Old 02-06-2005, 10:24 PM   #3
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yeah, wow, thanks darkstream. i was wondering why someone was trying to make a waxy chocolate. btw, i've heard that aussie's think paraffin is why fishes don't swim in circles... :D

umm, what was mochabean referring to, in american terms?
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Old 02-06-2005, 11:18 PM   #4
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Pariffin Wax, Parawax, Baker's Wax, or Cooking Wax - they are all basically the same thing, the food grade versions are more refined and are edible.

As an additive to chocolate it basically has three functions. One is to add a sheen to the dried chocolate (also why producers spray some fruits and vegetables like apples and cucumbers with a wax coating). Second it is sometimes added to make the chocolate harder - especially for things that are dipped with a very thin coating. Third, it is used to increase the melting point of the finished product.

When I was a child there was a cookie, think it was called a Pinwheel, that was a chocolate cookie base with a marshmallow cream on top that was dipped in chocolate. They were only available in the South (USA) during the winter because of the problems with the chocolate coating melting during shipping and storage. To combat that and make them available year round they began to add paraffin to the chocloate ... but people quit buying them because it changed the texture of the chocolate and gave it a funny taste.

My grandma used to use wax in some of her chocolate candies at Christmas - which is where I learned about this.
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Old 02-06-2005, 11:52 PM   #5
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thank you for the information. Paula Dean used it and i assumed it was edible. lol so it is safe to use in cooking? i wanted to make sure before i made a batch for our valentines day party at work. hehe thanks again

melissa
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Old 02-07-2005, 12:04 AM   #6
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I would assume if it's in a recipe then as long as you buy the right parafin everything will be fine!!
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Old 02-07-2005, 01:35 PM   #7
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In American, parafin wax is something similar to candle wax. My parents use to use it to seal jam jars from the air.

So if it is a waxy saubstance, it is PROBABLY safe for food purposes.

If is is liquid, has a pungent fuel like KEROSENE type smell and explodes when you put an open flame near it, then it is the other kind of parafin. Make sure what language it is being sold under.

Hope this is helpful.
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Old 02-07-2005, 05:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
yeah, wow, thanks darkstream. i was wondering why someone was trying to make a waxy chocolate. btw, i've heard that aussie's think paraffin is why fishes don't swim in circles... :D

umm, what was mochabean referring to, in american terms?
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Old 02-07-2005, 05:27 PM   #9
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Some chocolatiers do use a waxy substance here in this country for their chocolate bars, which is why I do not like them. They are not pure like the Belguim, Canadian, French, Norwegian, or basically most of the European bars.
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Old 12-19-2007, 08:49 PM   #10
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I think, I might try using this item when coating stuff in chocolate. (we'll see how it comes out...)
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